Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
11 "Pancreas"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Pediatric blunt pancreatic trauma at a single center in Korea: a retrospective review from 2007 to 2022
Joong Kee Youn, Hee-Beom Yang, Dayoung Ko, Hyun-Young Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):242-248.   Published online September 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0016
  • 621 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Blunt pancreatic trauma in pediatric patients is relatively rare, yet it is associated with high risks of morbidity and mortality This study aimed to review pediatric patients with blunt pancreatic trauma treated at a single center and provide treatment guidelines.
Methods
This study included patients under the age of 18 years who visited our center's pediatric emergency department and were diagnosed with pancreatic injury due to abdominal trauma via radiological examination between January 2007 and December 2022. Patients’ medical records were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed.
Results
Among 107 patients with abdominal trauma, 14 had pancreatic injury, with a median age of 8.2 years (interquartile range, 3.1–12.3 years). Eight patients were male and six were female. The most common mechanism of injury was falls from a height and bicycle handlebars (four cases each). Six patients had associated injuries. Two patients had American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grade I or II, eight had grade III, and four had grade IV or V injuries. Eight patients underwent surgical resection, and four were discharged with only an intervention for duct injuries.
Conclusions
Patients with blunt pancreatic trauma at our center have been successfully treated with surgical modalities, and more recently through nonsurgical approaches involving active endoscopic and radiologic interventions.
Summary
Case Reports
Blunt abdominal trauma resulting in pancreatic injury in a pediatric patient in Australia: a case report
Harmanjit Dev, Colin Kikiros
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):310-314.   Published online August 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0013
  • 560 View
  • 39 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic trauma from a blunt injury is fairly uncommon in the pediatric population. Furthermore, such trauma with associated disruption of the pancreatic duct (PD) is even less prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pancreatic injuries in the pediatric population are often missed and hence require a thorough workup in children presenting with any form of abdominal injury. This case report describes a young boy who presented with abdominal pain and did not initially inform medical staff about any injury. For this reason, his initial provisional diagnosis was appendicitis, but he was later found to have transection of the pancreas with injury to the PD on imaging. The management of such injuries in pediatric patients often poses a challenge due to a lack of pediatric physicians trained to perform interventions such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Furthermore, such interventions carry a higher risk when performed on children due to the smaller size of their pancreatic ducts. As a result, our patient had to be transferred to an adult center to undergo this procedure. Thus, maintaining a high degree of suspicion, along with a detailed history and examination, is crucial for the early diagnosis and management of pancreatic injuries.
Summary
Pancreaticoduodenectomy as an option for treating a hemodynamically unstable traumatic pancreatic head injury with a pelvic bone fracture in Korea: a case report
Sung Yub Jeong, Yoonhyun Lee, Hojun Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):261-264.   Published online December 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0059
  • 1,182 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic trauma occurs in 0.2% of patients with blunt trauma and 5% of severe abdominal injuries, which are associated with high mortality rates (up to 60%). Traumatic pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) has significant morbidity and appreciable mortality owing to complicating factors, associated injuries, and shock. The initial reconstruction in patients with severe pancreatic injuries aggravates their status by causing hypothermia, coagulopathy, and acidosis, which increase the risk for early mortality. A staging operation in which PD follows damage control surgery is a good option for hemodynamically unstable patients. We report the case of a patient who was treated by staging PD for an injured pancreatic head.
Summary
Original Article
Management of Traumatic Pancreatic Injuries: Evaluation of 7 Years of Experience at a Single Regional Trauma Center
Min A Lee, Seung Hwan Lee, Kang Kook Choi, Youngeun Park, Gil Jae Lee, Byungchul Yu
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):177-182.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0070
  • 2,604 View
  • 86 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Traumatic pancreatic injuries are rare, but their diagnosis and management are challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate and report our experiences with the management of pancreatic injuries.

Methods

We identified all adult patients (age >15) with pancreatic injuries from our trauma registry over a 7-year period. Data related to patients’ demographics, diagnoses, operative information, complications, and hospital course were abstracted from the registry and medical records.

Results

A total of 45 patients were evaluated. Most patients had blunt trauma (89%) and 21 patients (47%) had pancreatic injuries of grade 3 or higher. Twenty-eight patients (62%) underwent laparotomy and 17 (38%) received nonoperative management (NOM). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 24% (n=11), and only one patient died after NOM (due to a severe traumatic brain injury). Twenty-two patients (79%) underwent emergency laparotomy and six (21%) underwent delayed laparotomy. A drainage procedure was performed in 12 patients (43%), and pancreatectomy was performed in 16 patients (57%) (distal pancreatectomy [DP], n=8; DP with spleen preservation, n=5; pancreaticoduodenectomy, n=2; total pancreatectomy, n=1). Fourteen (31%) pancreas-specific complications occurred, and all complications were successfully managed without surgery. Solid organ injuries (n=14) were the most common type of associated abdominal injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥3).

Conclusions

For traumatic pancreatic injuries, an appropriate treatment method should be considered after evaluation of the accompanying injury and the patient’s hemodynamic status. NOM can be performed without mortality in appropriately selected cases.

Summary
Case Reports
The management of Pancreatic fistula Complicated by Gastric fistulation following Emergency Splenectomy
Tan Jih Huei, Henry Tan Chor Lip, Chow Sing Thou, Yuzaidi Mohamad, Rizal Imran Alwi
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):43-47.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.036
  • 5,819 View
  • 159 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Pancreatic and gastric fistulas are rare complications of emergency splenectomy, and it is extremely rare for a pancreatic fistula to be further complicated by a fistulation into the stomach. Here, we present a case of pancreatogastric fistula in a 60-year-old man who experienced polytrauma due to a blunt mechanism. He underwent emergency splenectomy for splenic injury and developed a pancreatic fistula as a complication. A percutaneous endoscopic procedure was performed to drain the fistula, after which he developed a pancreatogastric fistula as a further complication. A double-pigtail stent was inserted via gastroscopy into the fistula tract to allow internal drainage of the pancreatic collection into the stomach cavity. When a pancreatic fistula is complicated by gastric fistulation, endoscopic stenting of the pancreatogastric fistula tract for internal drainage is an effective treatment option.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Successful percutaneous transgastric diversion of a chronic post-operative combined pancreaticocutaneous and gastrocutaneous fistula using a snare-target technique: A case report
    Katherine J. Li, Ken Leslie, Derek W. Cool
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2021; 80: 105685.     CrossRef
Isolated Traumatic Injury of the Pancreatic Head: A Case Report
Dong Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):51-55.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.51
  • 2,085 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Isolated injury to the pancreas after abdominal trauma is uncommon, and a delay in diagnosis and treatment can increase the morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic decisions with respect to pancreatic trauma are usually made based on the site of injury and the status of the pancreatic ductal system. In this report, we describe the surgical management of pancreatic head transection as an isolated injury following blunt abdominal trauma. A 55-year-old man presented with epigastric pain that radiated to the back. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a hematoma in the pancreatic head and upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed complete disruption of and contrast leakage from the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head region with a nonenhanced upstream duct. Emergency pancreaticoduodenectomy was successfully performed, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 9 without any complications.
Summary
Original Articles
Management of Traumatic Pancreas Injury in Multiple Trauma: Single Center Experience
Hyuna Jang, Hong Jin Shim, Sung Whan Cha, Jae Gil Lee
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):111-117.
  • 1,175 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Pancreatic injury is rare in abdominal trauma patients (3%~12%). but it could result in significant morbidity and even mortality. Early and adequate decision making are very important in the management of patients with traumatic pancreatic injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinds of management and outcome through the review of our experience of pancreatic injury with multiple trauma.
METHODS
We reviewed 17 patients with traumatic pancreas injury via electronic medical records from Jan. 2002 and April. 2011. We collected demographic findings; the type, location and grade of pancreas injury, the treatment modality, and patient's outcomes, such as complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), and mortality.
RESULTS
Total 17 patients were reviewed, and man was 13 (88%). Traffic accident was the most common cause of injury. Pancreas neck was the most common injured site, and occured in 5 patients. Ductal injury was detected in 7 cases. Eleven patients were treated by surgical procedure, and in this group, 3 patients underwent the endoscopic retrograde pancreas drainage procedure coincidently. ERPD was tried in 8 patients, and failed in 2 patients. The major complications were post-traumatic fluid collection and abscess which accounted for 70% of all patients. The hospital stay was 35.9 days, and it was longer in patient with ductal injury (38.0+/-18.56 vs. 34.5+/-33.68 days). Only one patient was died due to septic shock associated with an uncontrolled retroperitoneal abscess.
CONCLUSION
Early diagnosis is the most important factor to apply the adequate treatment option and to manage the traumatic pancreas injury. Aggressive treatment should be considered in patients with a post-operative abscess.
Summary
Clinical Analysis of Traumatic Pancreatic Injury
Seon Mi Hwangbo, Young Bong Kwon, Kyung Jin Yun, Hyung Jun Kwon, Jae min Chun, Sang Geol Kim, Jin Young Park, Yun Jin Hwang, Young Gook Yun
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):68-74.
  • 991 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Althoughpancreas injury is rare in abdominal trauma,it posesa challengeto the surgeon because its clinicalfeaturesare not prominentand the presence of main duct injurycannot be easily identified by imaging studies. Furthermore, severe pancreas injuries require a distal pancreatectomy or a pancreaticoduodnectomy which are associated considerable morbidity and mortality. We reviewed the clinical features of and outcomes for patients with pancreas injury.
METHODS
For 10 years from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2010, thirty-four patients were diagnosedas having pancreas injury by using an explo-laparotomy. Patients successfully treated bynon-operative management were excluded. Patients were divided into early (n=18) and delayed surgery groups (n=11) based on an interval of 24hours between injury and surgery. The clinical features of and the outcomes for the patients in both groups were compared.
RESULTS
Males were more commonly injured (82.4% vs.17.6%). The mean age was 37.2 years. The injury mechanisms included vehicle accidents (62.9%, 22/34), assaults (20%, 7/34), and falls (11.4%, 3/34)). The head and neck of the pancreas was most commonly injured, followed by the body and the tail (16, 12, and 6 cases). Of the 34 patients, 26 (76.5%) patients had accompanying injuries. Grade 1 and 2 occurred in 14 (5 and 9) patients, and grade 3, 4, and 5 occurred in 20 (16, 3, and 1) patients. The early and delayed surgery groups showed no difference in surgical outcomes. Two patients with grade 3 in the early surgery group died after surgery,one due tomassive hemorrhage and the other due to septic shock. Of the five patients initially managed non-operatively,three developed peripancreatic necrosis and two developed pseudocyst. All five patients were successfully cured by surgery.
CONCLUSION
All cases of pancreas injury in this study involved blunt injury, and accompanying injury to major vessels or the bowel was the major cause of mortality. Surgery delayed for longer than 24 hours after was not associated with adverseoutcomes.
Summary
Experience with Blunt Pancreatic Trauma at Eulji University Hospital
Seung Hyun Yang, Yun Su Mun, Oh Sang Kwon, Min Koo Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):261-266.
  • 1,183 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Traumatic pancreatic injury is not common in abdominal trauma injury. However, the morbidity and the mortality rates of patients with pancreatic injury, which are related with difficulties of initial assessment, establishment of diagnosis, and treatment are relatively high. The aim of this study is to review our institution's experience and suggest a diagnosis and therapeutic algorithm for use in cases involving traumatic pancreatic injury.
METHODS
Eighteen(18) patients with blunt pancreatic injury from January, 2004 to October 2012 were included in this study. We analyzed treatment and diagnosis method, other organ injury, treatment interval, hospital stay and complications retrospectively.
RESULTS
Nine patients were treated with conservative medication and another nine patients were treated surgically. Complications occurred in nine patients, and one patient died due to intraventricular hemorrhage and subdural hemorrhage with multiple organ failure. Delayed surgery was performed in three cases. The early and delayed surgery groups showed difference in hospital stay and intensive care unit stay. Delayed surgery was associated with a longer hospital stay (p=0.007) than immediate surgery.
CONCLUSION
In blunt pancreatic trauma, proper early diagnosis and prompt treatment are recommended necessity. Based on this review of our experience, we also suggest the adoption of our institution's algorithm for cases involving traumatic pancreatic injury.
Summary
Experiences with Pancreaticoduodenal Injuries at a Single Institute
Jin Beom Cho, Jun Hyun Lee, Do Sang Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):266-272.
  • 1,025 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Although the duodenum and the pancreas are protected by surrounding organs and have a low probability of injury during trauma, the mortality and the morbidity due to complications is high. This report includes the pancreaticoduodenal injuries we observed that were treated at a single institute.
METHODS
The medical records of patients admitted to our institute between 2001 and 2012 for pancreaticoduodenal injury were retrospectively reviewed.
RESULTS
In our hospital, between 2001 and 2012, 15 patients were admitted for a pancreaticoduodenal injury. All patients experienced blunt trauma, 6 of whom were involved in traffic accidents and 9 of whom received injuries from physical assault. Most of the patients were men(13 of 15 patients, 86%) with a mean age of 23 years (range, 5-39 years). All patients were admitted to the emergency center and managed by the surgeons on duty. The mean value of the injury severity score was 22. The mortality rate was 6%(1 of 15 patients). Seven of the fourteen surviving patients(50%) had duodenal injury, 6 patients(42%) had a pancreatic injury, and 1 patient(7%) had a combined pancreaticoduodenal injury. The surgical procedures were targeted at damage control.
CONCLUSION
In conclusion, we believe that damage control surgery is the optimal management for a pancreaticoduodenal injury.
Summary
Management of Traumatic Pancreas Injury in Korea: Literature Review
Seung Hwan Lee, Ji Young Jang, Hongjin Shim, Jae Gil Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):207-213.
  • 1,064 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Traumatic pancreas injuries are rare conditions that result in high morbidity and mortality. Thus, early diagnosis and intervention are very important to manage pancreatic injuries. The purpose of this study is to review the management and outcomes of the pancreatic injuries in the Korean population.
METHODS
Original articles published from January 2001 to December 2012 and addressing the Korean population were selected by using indices such as 'pancreas injury', 'traumatic pancreas injury', and 'pancreatic trauma' to search KoreaMed and PubMed. Nine reports were selected to review the management options for surgery or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. We assessed the injury mechanisms, injury severities, associated injuries, types of operation, and outcomes.
RESULTS
Two hundred fifty of the 332 patients included in the 9 selected reports were men, and the mean age of all patients was 36.4 years. The main injury mechanism was traffic accidents(65.6%). Most patients had grade II or III injuries(68.9%). The most common extra-pancreatic injury site was the liver, followed by the chest and spleen. Operative management, including distal pancreatectomies(129), drainage procedures(64), pancreaticoduodenectomies( 23), and others(60), was used for 276 patients. The reported mortality rate was 10.2%, and the morbidity rate ranged from 38% to 76.9%. The average length of hospital stay was 39.5 days. Risk factors for mortality were amount of transfusion, injury severity, base deficit, age, and presence of shock.
CONCLUSION
In this study, we found neither significant data nor a consensus. If national guidelines are to be developed and established, a national data bank or registry, and nationwide data collection are required.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury