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10 "Laparotomy"
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Original Article
Emergency department laparotomy for patients with severe abdominal trauma: a retrospective study at a single regional trauma center in Korea
Yu Jin Lee, Soon Tak Jeong, Joongsuck Kim, Kwanghee Yeo, Ohsang Kwon, Kyounghwan Kim, Sung Jin Park, Jihun Gwak, Wu Seong Kang
Received October 1, 2023  Accepted November 7, 2023  Published online January 12, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0072    [Epub ahead of print]
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  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Severe abdominal injuries often require immediate clinical assessment and surgical intervention to prevent life-threatening complications. In Jeju Regional Trauma Center, we have instituted a protocol for emergency department (ED) laparotomy at the trauma bay. We investigated the mortality and time taken from admission to ED laparotomy.
Methods
We reviewed the data recorded in our center’s trauma database between January 2020 and December 2022 and identified patients who underwent laparotomy because of abdominal trauma. Laparotomies that were performed at the trauma bay or the ED were classified as ED laparotomy, whereas those performed in the operating room (OR) were referred to as OR laparotomy. In cases that required expeditious hemostasis, ED laparotomy was performed appropriately.
Results
From January 2020 to December 2022, 105 trauma patients admitted to our hospital underwent emergency laparotomy. Of these patients, six (5.7%) underwent ED laparotomy. ED laparotomy was associated with a mortality rate of 66.7% (four of six patients), which was significantly higher than that of OR laparotomy (17.1%, 18 of 99 patients, P=0.006). All the patients who received ED laparotomy also underwent damage control laparotomy. The time between admission to the first laparotomy was significantly shorter in the ED laparotomy group (28.5 minutes; interquartile range [IQR], 14–59 minutes) when compared with the OR laparotomy group (104 minutes; IQR, 88–151 minutes; P <0.001). The two patients who survived after ED laparotomy had massive mesenteric bleeding, which was successfully ligated. The other four patients, who had liver laceration, kidney rupture, spleen injury, and pancreas avulsion, succumbed to the injuries.
Conclusions
Although ED laparotomy was associated with a higher mortality rate, the time between admission and ED laparotomy was markedly shorter than for OR laparotomy. Notably, major mesenteric hemorrhages were effectively controlled through ED laparotomy.
Summary
Case Report
Pre-Hospital and In-Hospital Management of an Abdominal Impalement Injury Caused by a Tree Branch
So Ra Ahn, Joo Hyun Lee, Keun Young Kim, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):288-293.   Published online December 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0051
  • 4,516 View
  • 178 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

In South Korea, most patients who visit trauma centers with abdominal injuries have blunt trauma, and penetrating injuries are relatively rare. In extremely rare cases, some patients are admitted with a long object penetrating their abdomen, and these injuries are referred to as abdominal impalement injuries. Most cases of impalement injuries lead to fatal bleeding, and patients often die at the scene of the accident. However, patients who survive until reaching the hospital can have a good prognosis with optimal treatment. A 68-year-old female patient was admitted to the trauma center with a 4-cm-thick tree branch impaling her abdomen. The patient was transported by a medical helicopter and had stable vital signs at admission. The branch sticking out of the abdomen was quite long; thus, we carefully cut the branch with an electric saw to perform computed tomography (CT). CT revealed no signs of major blood vessel injury, but intestinal perforation was observed. During laparotomy, the tree branch was removed after confirming that there were no vascular injuries, and enterostomy was performed because of extensive intestinal injury. After treating other injuries, the patient was discharged without any complications except colostomy. Abdominal impalement injuries are treated using various approaches depending on the injury mechanism and injured region. However, the most important consideration is that the impaled object should not be removed during transportation and resuscitation. Instead, it should only be removed after checking for injuries to blood vessels during laparotomy in an environment where injury control is possible.

Summary
Original Articles
Indications for Laparotomy in Patients with Abdominal Penetrating Injuries Presenting with Ambiguous Computed Tomography Findings
Eun Ji Choi, Sanghee Choi, Byung Hee Kang
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):112-118.   Published online June 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0058
  • 2,632 View
  • 88 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Negative laparotomy in patients with abdominal penetrating injuries (APIs) is associated with deleterious outcomes and unnecessary expense; however, the indications for laparotomy in hemodynamically stable patients with ambiguous computed tomography (CT) findings remain unclear. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with negative laparotomy. findings

Methods

Data of patients who underwent laparotomy for APIs between 2011 and 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who presented with definite indications for laparotomy were excluded. The patients were dichotomized into negative and positive laparotomy groups, and the baseline characteristics, laboratory test results, and CT findings were compared between the groups.

Results

Of 55 patients with ambiguous CT findings, 38 and 17 patients were assigned to the negative and positive laparotomy groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the baseline characteristics or the nature of the ambiguous CT findings. However, the laboratory test results showed that there was a difference in the percentage of neutrophils between the groups (negative: 55.6% [range 47.4–66.1%] vs. positive: 79.8% [range 77.6–88.2%], p<0.001), although the total white blood cell count was not significantly different. The mean duration of hospital stay for the negative laparotomy group was 13.1 days, and seven patients (18.4%) experienced complications.

Conclusions

Diagnostic factors definitively indicative of laparotomy were not identified, although the percentage of neutrophils might be helpful. However, routine laparotomy in patients with peritoneal injuries could result in instances of negative laparotomy.

Summary
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Laparoscopy for Abdominal Trauma: A Single Surgeon’s Experience at a Level I Trauma Center
Hancheol Jo, Dong Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):248-256.   Published online March 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0081
  • 3,114 View
  • 103 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Laparoscopy has various advantages over laparotomy in terms of postoperative recovery. The number of surgeons using laparoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in abdominal trauma patients is increasing, whereas open conversion is becoming less common. This report summarizes a single surgeon’s experience of laparoscopy at a level I trauma center and evaluates the feasibility of laparoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for abdominal trauma patients.

Methods

In total, 30 abdominal trauma patients underwent laparoscopy by a single surgeon from October 2014 to May 2020. The purpose of laparoscopy was categorized as diagnostic or therapeutic. Patients were classified into three groups by type of surgery: total laparoscopic surgery (TLS), laparoscopy-assisted surgery (LAS), or open conversion (OC). Univariate analysis was performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages.

Results

The mechanism of injury was blunt in 19 (63.3%) and penetrating in 11 patients (36.7%). Eleven (36.7%) and 19 patients (63.3%) underwent diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy, respectively. The hospital stay was shorter for patients who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy than for those who underwent therapeutic laparoscopy (5.0 days vs. 13.0 days), but no other surgical outcomes differed between the groups. TLS, LAS, and OC were performed in 12 (52.2%), eight (34.8%), and three patients (13.0%), respectively. There was no significant difference in morbidity and mortality among the three groups.

Conclusions

Laparoscopic surgery for selected cases of abdominal trauma may be feasible and safe as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in hemodynamically stable patients due to the low OC rate and the absence of fatal morbidity and mortality.

Summary
Feasibility of Early Definitive Internal Fixation of Pelvic Bone Fractures in Therapeutic Open Abdomen
Kyunghak Choi, Kwang-Hwan Jung, Min Ae Keum, Sungjeep Kim, Jihoon T Kim, Kyu-Hyouck Kyoung
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):18-22.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.044
  • 4,447 View
  • 99 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Damage control laparotomy has contributed to improved survival rates for severe abdominal injuries. A large part of severe abdominal injury occurs with a concomitant pelvic bone fracture. The safety and effectiveness of internal fixation of pelvic bone fracture(s) has not been established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate infection risk in the pelvic surgical site in patients who underwent emergent abdominal surgery.

Methods

This single-center retrospective observational study was based on data collected from a prospectively maintained registry between January 2015 and June 2019. Patients who underwent laparotomy and pelvic internal fixation were included. Individuals <18 and ≥80 years of age, those with no microbiological investigations, and those who underwent one-stage abdominal surgery were excluded. Comprehensive statistical comparative analysis was not performed due to the small number of enrolled patients.

Results

A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria, and the most common injury mechanism was anterior-posterior compression (67%). The average duration of open abdomen was 98 hours (range, 44–198), and the time interval between abdominal closure and pelvic surgery was 98 hours. One patient (16.7%) died due to multi-organ dysfunction syndrome. Micro-organisms were identified in the abdominal surgical site in five patients (83%), with no micro-organisms in pelvic surgical sites. There was no unplanned implant removal.

Conclusions

Internal fixation of pelvic bone fracture(s) could be performed in the state of open abdomen, and the advantages of early fixation may countervail the risks for cross contamination.

Summary
Case Report
Heterotopic Ossification in the Abdominal Wall after Exploratory Laparotomy
Hohyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(3):177-180.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.047
  • 3,928 View
  • 105 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Heterotopic bone formation in abdominal incisions is a recognized but uncommon sequela of abdominal surgery. On the other hand, the formation of ectopic bone is a well-recognized complication following arthroplasty of the hip. Heterotopic ossification of midline abdominal incision scars is a subtype of myositis ossificans traumatica. Ectopic bone formation of midline abdominal incisions may cause regional pain or discomfort in the patient after surgery. If symptomatic, treatment is complete excision with primary closure. Radiologically, it is important to distinguish this benign entity from postoperative complications. We report a 69-year-old male who underwent exploratory laparotomy for traumatic small bowel perforation. A segment of abnormal hard tissue was found in the abdominal wall. Heterotopic ossification may occur at various sites and is a recognized but infrequent sequela of exploratory laparotomy. This case high-lights clinical and etiological features of this finding.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Heterotopic Ossification in the Midline Scar in Xiphoid and Sub-xiphoid Region
    Vadivalagianambi Sivakumar, Venkatraman Indiran
    Indian Journal of Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unusual osseous metaplasia following hernia repair with Prolene mesh: a case report
    Awrad Nasralla, Bonnie Tsang
    Journal of Surgical Case Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Indications for an Immediate Laparotomy in Patients with Abdominal Stab Wounds
Hyeong Ju Kim, Seong Youn Hwang, Young Cheol Choi
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(2):106-114.
  • 1,962 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
There is little controversy that a classic indication such as hemodynamic instability or any sign of peritoneal irritation requires an immediate laparotomy in the management of abdominal stab wounds. However, omental herniation or bowel evisceration as an indication for an immediate laparotomy is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of these factors as indications for an immediate laparotomy.
METHODS
The medical records of 98 consecutive abdominal stab wounds patients admitted to the Emergency Center of Masan Samsung Hospital from January 2000 to December 2006 were carefully examined retrospectively. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, thirty-nine factors, including the classic indication and intraabdominal organ evisceration, were evaluated and were found to be associated with a need for a laparotomy. Also, the classic indication was compared with a new indication consisting of components of the classic indication and intra-abdominal organ evisceration by constructing a contingency table according to the need for a laparotomy.
RESULTS
Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed any sign of peritoneal irritation, base deficit, and age to be significant factors associated with the need for a laparotomy (p<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rates of the classic indication were 98.6%, 72.0%, and 91.8%, respectively, and those of the new indication were 93.2%, 84.0%, and 90.8%, respectively. The differences in those rates between the above two indications were not significant.
CONCLUSION
Intra-abdominal organ evisceration was not a significant factor for an immediate laparotomy. Moreover, the new indication including intra-abdominal organ evisceration was not superior to the classic indication. Therefore, in the management of abdominal stab wounds, the authors suggest that an immediate laparotomy should be performed on patients with hemodynamic instability or with any sign of peritoneal irritation.
Summary
Usefulness of FAST for Evaluation of Blunt Abdominal Trauma Patients
Yong Sik Chu, Ok Jun Kim, Sung Uk Choi, Jung Han Lee
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):135-142.
  • 1,066 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
We planned to determine the diagnostic capability of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) in cases of blunt abdominal injury (BAI).
METHODS
A retrospective analysis of FAST sheets was performed from April 2002 to December 2004. During the study period, 135 BAI patients were evaluated with FAST at the Emergency Department of Bundang CHA Hospital. Of this group, twenty-eight patients were excluded, leaving 107 patients for analysis. Abdomen CT (computerized tomography) or exploratory laparotomy confirmed the presence of hemoperitoneum. At the secondary survey, patients underwent a three-view FAST examination (LogicQ; General Electric, Waukesha, USA) by an emergency physician, followed within 2 hours by an abdomen CT or exploratory laparotomy. The FAST examination was considered positive if it demonstrated evidence of free intra-abdominal fluid.
RESULTS
There were 45 true-positive FAST examination, 57 true-negatives, 1 false-positive, and 4 false negatives (sensitivity 91.8%, specificity 98.3%, positive predictive value 97.8%, negative predictive value 93.4%). The area under the ROC curve was 0.951 for the FAST examination.
CONCLUSION
FAST is a highly reliable method for screening patients suspected of having BAI for the presence or absence of hemoperitoneum.
Summary
Case Report
Treatment of Ongoing Bleeding after a Damage Control Laparotomy for a Pelvic Bone Fracture: Arterial Embolization: A Case Report
Ki Hoon Kim, Kyu Hyouk Kyung, Jin Su Kim, Sung Jin Park, So Hyun Nam, Woon Won Kim, Yong Han Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):159-163.
  • 1,066 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Massive bleeding due to traumatic pelvic bone fracture is a leading cause of death. Thus, several methods to control bleeding have been attempted, but none of these has yet been clearly established. After an automobile accident, a 34-year-old motorist was admitted to the Emergency Department for right hip,leg and abdominal pain. Because the patient's pressure remained consistently low and pelvic bone fracture and abdominal bleeding were found on radiologic examination, an explorative laparotomy was performed. After pelvic packing and bleeding control, bleeding still continued, so Angiography was performed, and arterial embolization for bleeding was performed.
Summary
Original Article
A Clinical Analysis of Abdominal Stab Wounds
Jiyeon Park, Min Chung, Yeongdon Lee, Jungnam Lee, Woonki Lee, Yeonho Park, Jungheum Baek, Heunggyu Park, Keonkuk Kim, Jinmo Kang, Sangtae Choi, Wonsuk Lee, Seungyoun Park
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):134-141.
  • 1,099 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
A classic approach to abdominal stab wounds has been a routine laparotomy for the purpose of diagnosis or treatment. However, management protocols for abdominal stab wounds are still contentious in most trauma centers. We examined the relationship between the character of the stab wound and the injured intraabdominal organs by retrospectively analyzing the medical records of patients with abdominal stab wounds admitted to Gil hospital, and the findings for our patients are then confronted with a review of the literature. We aimed to propose proper management protocols to approach abdominal stab wounds.
METHODS
The medical records of all 80 patients sustaining abdominal stab wounds, admitted at the Department of Surgery, Gil Hospital, Gachon Medical School, from January 2004 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All the abdominal stab wounds were collated based on the site and the character of the injury, investigations performed on admission, results of investigations, operations performed and findings at the time of the operation.
RESULTS
The most prevalent age group was patients in their forties and the average age of the patients was 41 years for both genders. The stab wounds were most commonly located at the periumbilical area (16.9%), followed by the epigastric area (15.6%), and 18.2% of the patients had multiple wounds. The most commonly eviscerated organ was the omentum (9 out of 16 cases); 61.7% of non-eviscerated patients underwent a therapeutic laparotomy while 81.3% of eviscerated patients underwent a therapeutic laparotomy. The small bowel was the most commonly injured organ (22.7%, 17 out of 75 injuries). The review revealed a relatively common diaphragmatic injury in abdominal stab wound patients (8 cases, 10.5%). The average hospital stay was 11 days.
CONCLUSION
This review revealed commonly eviscerated and injured intraabdominal organs in abdominal stab wound patients and their relationship with a therapeutic laparotomy. Although the management is still controversial, the authors suggest indications for an immediate laparotomy and a protocol for managing abdominal stab wounds. Hemodynamic instability and peritoneal irritation signs are definite indicators for an immediate laparotomy, but the review revealed intraabdominal organ evisceration alone not to be a statistically significant factor. In addition, the authors suggest that abnormal CT findings can be valuable for making a decision on management of hemodynamically stable stab wound patients. Further study may clarify a role for a more selective approach to operative intervention and for a more extensive use of selective observation.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury