Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
1 "Blood coagulation"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Relationship between sonorheometry parameters and laboratory values in a critical care setting in Italy: a retrospective cohort study
Antonio Romanelli, Renato Gammaldi, Alessandro Calicchio, Salvatore Palmese, Antonio Siglioccolo
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):210-216.   Published online July 4, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0014
  • 849 View
  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This preliminary retrospective study analyzed the relationship between the parameters provided by sonorheometry device Quantra and the coagulation values obtained from standard venous blood samples in patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU).
Methods
We reviewed medical charts of 13 ICU adult patients in whom at least one coagulation study with Quantra was performed. The relationship between Quantra and laboratory data was analyzed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rho). The 95% confidence interval (CI) was computed. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant.
Results
We collected 28 data pairs. Statistically significant moderate correlations were found for the following parameters: clot time (CT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (rho=0.516; 95% CI, 0.123–0.904; P=0.009; clot stiffness (CS) and the international normalized ratio (INR; rho=0.418; 95% CI, 0.042–0.787; P=0.039); INR and platelet contribution to CS (rho=0.459; 95% CI, 0.077–0.836; P=0.022); platelet count and platelet contribution to CS (PCS; rho=0.498; 95% CI, 0.166–0.825; P=0.008); and fibrinogen and fibrinogen contribution to CS (FCS; rho=0.620; 95% CI, 0.081–0.881; P=0.001).
Conclusions
Quantra can provide useful information regarding coagulation status, showing modest correlations with the parameters obtained from laboratory tests. During diffuse bleeding, CT and FCS values can guide the proper administration of clotting factors and fibrinogens. However, the correlation of INR with CS and PCS can cause misinterpretation. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Quantra parameters and laboratory tests in the critical care setting and the role of sonorheometry in guiding targeted therapies and improving outcomes.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury