Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
1 "Operative surgical procedures"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Experience of surgical treatments for abdominal inferior vena cava injuries in a regional trauma center in Korea
Jin Woo Park, Dong Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):105-113.   Published online June 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0001
  • 1,125 View
  • 66 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries are a rare type of traumatic abdominal injuries that are challenging to treat and have a very high mortality rate. This study described our experience with the surgical treatment of traumatic IVC injuries, and we investigated the demographics, clinical profiles, and surgical outcomes of cases at a regional trauma center.
Methods
Among the 16 patients who were treated for a traumatic IVC injury between January 2014 and March 2022, 14 underwent surgery. The surgical outcomes included overall mortality and 24-hour mortality, and we investigated the factors associated with these surgical outcomes. The 14 patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the IVC injury (retrohepatic IVC or higher vs. subhepatic IVC), and differences between the two groups were analyzed.
Results
A body mass index (BMI) >23.0 kg/m2 (P=0.046), an elevated serum lactate level (P=0.043), and a shorter operation time (P=0.016) were associated with overall mortality. A higher BMI (P=0.050), high serum lactate level (P=0.004), shorter operation time (P=0.005), and an injury at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level (P=0.031) were associated with 24-hour mortality. Younger age (P=0.028), higher BMI (P=0.005), an acidic pH (P=0.028), high lactatemia (P=0.012), a higher hemoglobin level (P=0.012), and shorter door-to-operating room time (P=0.028) were associated with injury at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level. Patients with subhepatic IVC injuries had a high rate of direct repair (75.0%) and a significantly lower 24-hour mortality rate (37.5%, P=0.031).
Conclusions
Subhepatic IVC injuries are easy to access and are usually treated with a direct repair method. Injuries at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level are difficult to treat surgically and require a systematic and multidisciplinary treatment strategy.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury