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3 "Intra-abdominal hypertension"
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Original Articles
Immediate Post-laparotomy Hypotension in Patients with Severe Traumatic Hemoperitoneum
Gil Jae Lee, Min A Lee, Byungchul Yoo, Youngeun Park, Myung Jin Jang, Kang Kook Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):38-42.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.014
  • 6,917 View
  • 122 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Immediate post-laparotomy hypotension (PLH) is a precipitous drop in blood pressure caused by a sudden release of abdominal tamponade after laparotomy in cases of severe hemoperitoneum. The effect of laparotomy on blood pressure in patients with significant hemoperitoneum is unknown.

Methods

In total, 163 patients underwent laparotomy for trauma from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015. Exclusion criteria included the following: negative laparotomy, only a hollow viscous injury, and hemoperitoneum <1,000 mL. After applying those criteria, 62 patients were enrolled in this retrospective review. PLH was defined as a decrease in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≥10 mmHg within 10 minutes after laparotomy.

Results

The mean estimated hemoperitoneum was 3,516 mL. The incidence of PLH was 23% (14 of 62 patients). The MAP did not show significant differences before and after laparotomy (5 minutes post-laparotomy, 67.5±16.5 vs. 68.3±18.8 mmHg; p=0.7; 10 minutes post-laparotomy, 67.5±16.5 vs. 70.4±18.8 mmHg; p=0.193). The overall in-hospital mortality was 24% (15 of 62 patients). Mortality was not significantly higher in the PLH group (two of 14 [14.3%] vs. 13 of 48 [27.1%]; p=0.33). No statistically significant between-group differences were observed in the intensive care unit and hospital stay.

Conclusions

PLH may be less frequent and less devastating than it is often considered. Surgical hemostasis during laparotomy is important. Laparotomy with adequate resuscitation may explain the equivalent outcomes in the two groups.

Summary
Clinical Effects of Intra-Abdominal Pressure in Critically Ill Trauma Patients
Dong Yeon Ryu, Hohyun Kim, June Pill Seok, Chan Kyu Lee, Kwang-Hee Yeo, Seon-Uoo Choi, Jae-Hun Kim, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(2):86-92.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.052
  • 3,808 View
  • 81 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

There is increasing interest in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) in critically ill patients. This study investigated the effects and outcomes of elevated IAP in a trauma intensive care unit (ICU) population.

Methods

Eleven consecutive critically ill patients admitted to the trauma ICU at Pusan National University Hospital Regional Trauma Center were included in this study. IAP was measured every 8?12 hours (intermittently) for 72 hours. IAP was registered as mean and maximal values per day throughout the study period. IAH was defined as IAP ≥12 mmHg. Abdominal compartment syndrome was defined as IAP ≥20 mmHg plus ≥1 new organ failure. The main outcome measure was in-hospital mortality.

Results

According to maximal and mean IAP values, 10 (90.9%) of the patients developed IAH during the study period. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was significantly higher in patients with IAP ≥20 mmHg than in those with IAP <20 mmHg (16 vs. 5, p=0.049). The hospital mortality rate was 27.3%. Patients with a maximum IAP ≥20 mmHg exhibited significantly higher hospital mortality rates (p=0.006). Non-survivors had higher maximum and mean IAP values.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that an elevated IAP may be associated with a poor prognosis in critically ill trauma patients.

Summary
Abdominal Wall Closure Using Artificial Mesh for Patients with an Open Abdomen
Sung Whan Cha, Hong Jin Shim, Ji Young Jang, Jae Gil Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):172-177.
  • 1,056 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
After damage control surgery, abdominal wall closure may be impossible due to increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), and primary closure may induce abdominal compartment syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the IAP and the feasibility of abdominal wall closure using artificial mesh.
METHODS
From July 2010 to July 2011, 8 patients with intra-abdominal hypertension underwent abdominal wall closure using artificial mesh. Medical data such as demographics, diagnosis, operation, IAP, postoperative complications, mortality and length of hospital stays were collected and reviewed, retrospectively. One patient was excluded because of inadequate measurement of the IAP.
RESULTS
Seven patients, 4 males and 3 females, were enrolled, and the mean age was 54.1 years old. Causes of operations were six traumatic abdominal injuries and one intra-abdominal infection. The IAP was reduced from 21.9+/-6.6 mmHg before opening the abdomen to 15.1+/-7.1 mmHg after fascial closure. Fascial closure was done on 14.9+/-17.5 days after the first operation. The mean lengths of the hospital and the intensive care unit (ICU) stays were 49.6 days and 29.7 days respectively. Operations were performed 3.1+/-1.5 times in all patients. Two patients expired, and one was transferred in a moribund state. Three patients suffered from complications, such as retroperitoneal abscesses, enterocutaneous fistulas, and bleeding that was related to the negative pressure wound therapy.
CONCLUSION
After abdominal wall closure using artificial mesh, intra-abdominal pressure was well controlled, and abdominal compartment syndrome does not occur. When the abdominal wall in patients who have intra-abdominal hypertension is closed, artificial mesh may be useful for maintaining a lower abdominal pressure. However, when negative pressure wound therapy is used, the possibility of serious complications must be kept in mind.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury