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3 "Computed tomography angiography"
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Case Reports
Management of a traumatic avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle in polytrauma patient in Korea: a case report
Chang Hwa Ham, Woo-Keun Kwon, Joo Han Kim, Youn-Kwan Park, Jong Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):147-151.   Published online December 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0058
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle are rare lesion at craniovertebral junction. It is often related to high-energy traumatic injuries and show diverse clinical presentations. Neurologic deficit and instabilities may justify surgical treatment. However, the integrity of neurovascular structures is undervalued in the current literatures. In this case report, we described a 26-year-old female patient with avulsion fracture of occipital condyle following a traffic accident. On initial presentation, her Glasgow Coma Scale was 8. She presented with fracture compound comminuted depressed, on the left side of her forehead with skull base fracture extending into clivus and occipital condyle. Her left occipital condyle showed avulsion injury with displacement deep into the skull base. On her computed tomography angiography, the displaced occipital condyle compressed on the sigmoid sinus resulting in its obstruction. While she was recovering her consciousness during her stay in the hospital, the lower cranial nerves showed dysfunctions corresponding to Collet-Sicard syndrome. Due to high risk of vascular injury, the patient was conservatively treated for the occipital condyle fracture. On the 4 months postdischarge follow-up, her cranial nerve symptoms practically recovered, and the occipital condyle showed signs of fusion without further displacement. Current literatures focus on neurologic deficit and stability for the surgical decisions. However, it is also important to evaluate the neurovascular integrity to assess the risk of its manipulation as it may result in fatal outcome. This case shows, an unstable avulsion occipital condyle fracture with neurologic deficit can be treated conservatively and show a favorable outcome.
Summary
Delayed diagnosis of popliteal artery injury after traumatic knee dislocation in Korea: a case report
Chung-Eun Lee, In-Seok Jang, Sang-Yoon Song, Jung-Woo Lim, Kun-Tae Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):142-146.   Published online December 6, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0064
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The popliteal artery damage is present to range from 1.6% to 64% of patients with knee dislocation, and it is crucial to evaluate vascular damage even if there are no prominent ischemic changes in the distal area. The injury of the popliteal artery by high-energy forces around the knee caused by a fall or traffic accident is a potentially limb-threatening complication in traumatic knee dislocation. The popliteal artery injury by blunt trauma has a high risk of limb amputation because the initial symptoms can show normal vascular circulation without urgent ischemia or obvious vascular injury signs. Since the collateral branches can delay the symptoms of decisive ischemia or pulseless extremity, the vascular damage is a major cause of limb amputation. In the present study, we describe a rare case of delayed diagnosis of popliteal artery injury after traumatic knee dislocation, requiring urgent limb revascularization surgery. After revascularization of the occluded popliteal artery, graft interposition was performed, and successful restoration was confirmed. This case illustrates that, even if ankle-brachial index >0.9 or equal pedal pulse to the uninjured extremity, serial vascular evaluation is required if there are soft signs such as diminished pulses, neurologic signs, or high-energy damage such as multiple ligament ruptures since delayed diagnosis of artery injury can be the major cause of limb amputation. The clinicians need to regard high-energy trauma such as multiple ligament rupture around the knee as a hard sign, and immediate computed tomography angiography can be helpful for accurate diagnosis and treatment.
Summary
Original Article
Epidemiology and clinical characteristics of posttraumatic hospitalized patients with symptoms related to venous thromboembolism: a single-center retrospective study
Hyung Su Park, Sung Youl Hyun, Woo Sung Choi, Jin-Seong Cho, Jae Ho Jang, Jea Yeon Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):159-167.   Published online June 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0052
  • 1,967 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of trauma inpatients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) symptoms diagnosed using computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in Korea
Methods
In total, 7,634 patients admitted to the emergency department of Gachon University Gil Medical Center, a tertiary hospital, and hospitalized between July 1, 2018 and December 31, 2020 were registered for this study. Of these patients, 278 patients who underwent CTA were enrolled in our study.
Results
VTE was found in 120 of the 7,634 patients (1.57%), and the positive diagnosis rate of the 278 patients who underwent CTA was 43.2% (120 of 278). The incidence of VTE was statistically significantly higher among those with severe head and neck injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 3–5) than among those with nonsevere head and neck injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 0–2; P=0.038). In a subgroup analysis, the severe and nonsevere head and neck injury groups showed statistically significant differences in known independent risk factors for VTE. In logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of severe head and neck injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 3–5) for VTE was 1.891 (95% confidence interval, 1.043–3.430).
Conclusions
Trauma patients with severe head and neck injuries are more susceptible to VTE than those with nonsevere head and neck injuries. Thus, physicians must consider CTA as a priority for the diagnosis of VTE in trauma patients with severe head and neck injuries who show VTE-associated symptoms.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury