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Case Reports
External iliac artery injury with posterior pelvic ring injury in Korea: a report of two cases
Joosuk Ahn, Ji Wan Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):137-141.   Published online December 1, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0046
  • 1,584 View
  • 46 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pelvic ring injuries associated with external iliac artery injuries are rare and may be life-threatening condition. The most important factors in the managements are the immediate bleeding control and restoration of distal blood flow. We report two cases of pelvic ring injuries with external artery injuries. One case was occlusion of external iliac artery with concomitant rupture of internal iliac artery. The other case was ruptured external iliac artery. Every surgeon must understand the possibility of hidden lesions—for example, arterial rupture and thrombus—and should consider the need for embolization or thrombectomy when treating this type of injury.
Summary
Rectal Injury Associated with Pelvic Fracture
Jihun Gwak, Min A Lee, Byungchul Yu, Kang Kook Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(4):201-203.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.4.201
  • 4,422 View
  • 61 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Rectal injury is seen in 1-2% of all pelvic fractures, and lower urinary tract injury occurs in up to 7%. These injuries are rare, but if missed, can lead to a severe septic response. Rectal injury may be suspected by the presence of gross blood on digital rectal examination. However, this classic sign is not always present on physical examination. If an Antero-Posterior Compression type pelvic fracture is seen, we should consider the possibility of rectal and lower urinary tract injury. It is important to define the anatomic location of the rectal injury as it relates to the peritoneal reflection. Trauma to the intraperitoneal rectum should be managed as a colonic injury. Extraperitoneal rectal injury should be managed with fecal diversion regardless of primary repair. We present the case of a 46-year-old man who was referred to our hospital following a major trauma to the pelvis in a pedestrian accident.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rectal Perforation Associated with a Pelvic Fracture Managed with Lateral Caudal Axial Pattern Flap Surgery Using the Tail to Skin Defect in a Mixed-Breed Dog
    Jongjin Lee, Jinsu Kang, Namsoo Kim, Suyoung Heo
    Journal of Veterinary Clinics.2021; 38(5): 240.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Clinical Outcome of a Precontoured Symphysis Pubis Plate with Tension Band Wiring for Traumatic Symphysis Pubis Rupture in Pelvic Fractures
Jeong Moon Lee, Sun Jung Yoon, Myung Sik Park, Kyung Jin Song
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(1):22-27.   Published online March 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.1.22
  • 2,708 View
  • 11 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The optimal method of fixation of symphysis pubis (SP) diastasis in pelvic ring injuries is still controversial. In this study, we investigated the radiological and the clinical results of a precontoured 4.5-mm symphysis pubis (SP) plate with tension band wiring (TBW) after an anterior pelvic injury in pelvic fractures.
METHODS
We treated 25 patients with traumatic SP diastasis by open reduction and internal fixation with plates and wires. We used a four-hole 4.5-mm precontoured SP plate with a tension band wiring.
RESULTS
Patients with a SP with TBW fixation achieved excellent or good results at final follow-up. Post-operative complications included two (8%) patients with metal work movement. The mean symphyseal width was smaller in 4.5 mm SP plate with TBW during 1-year follow up period.
CONCLUSION
A precontoured symphysis pubis plate (4.5 mm) with figure-of-eight fashion tension band wiring shows favorable radiological results, excellent or good clinical outcome, and a lower complication (hardware failure and revision surgery).
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Is there a clinical benefit of additional tension band wiring in plate fixation of the symphysis?
    Myung-sik Park, Sun-Jung Yoon, Seung-min Choi, Kwanghun Lee
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Correlation between Young and Burgess Classification and Transcatheter Angiographic Embolization in Severe Trauma Patients
Yong Han Cha, Young Hoon Sul, Ha Yong Kim, Won Sik Choy
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):144-148.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.144
  • 1,997 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Immediate identification of vascular injury requiring embolization in patients with pelvic bone fracture isn't an easy task. There have been many trials finding indicators of embolization for patients with pelvic bone fracture. Although Young and Burgess classification is useful in decision making of treatment, it is reported to have little value as indicator of embolization in major trauma patients. The aim of this study is to find out Young and burgess classification on predicting vessel injury by analzyng pelvic radiograph taken from major trauma patients with pelvic bone fracture.
METHODS
Among major trauma patients with injury severity scores (ISS) higher than 15 who visited our emergency room from January 2011 to June 2014, 200 patients were found with pelvic bone fracture in trauma series and thus pelvic CT angiography was taken. Setting aside patients with exclusion criteria, 153 patients were enrolled in this study for analysis of Young and Burgess classification.
RESULTS
The most common mechanism of injury was lateral compression in both groups. There was no statistical significant difference in Young and Burgess classification (p=0.397). The obturator artery was the most commonly injured artery in both groups. Six patients had more than one site of bleeding.
CONCLUSION
Prediction of transcatheter angiographic embolization using Young and Burgess classification in severe trauma patients is difficult and requires additional studies.
Summary
Case Report
Fatal Pulmonary Thromboembolism after a Pelvic Ring Injury: A Case Report
Joon Woo Kim, Chang Wug Oh, Hyung Sub Kim, Hee June Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):224-228.
  • 1,210 View
  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pelvic ring and acetabular fractures are major high-energy trauma injuries and are often associated with other injuries or fractures. In particular, a venous thromboembolism is an important common complication in trauma patients with pelvic or acetabular fractures. We report a case of a fatal pulmonary thromboembolism after a pelvic fracture in a 60-year-old female patient.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury