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Original Article
Outcomes of open neck injuries
Dongsub Noh, Jin Ho Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):168-172.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0056
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The neck is a particularly critical region for penetrating injuries due to the close proximity of the trachea, esophagus, blood vessels, and the spinal cord. An open neck injury has the potential for serious morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the assessment and management of open neck injuries.
Methods
In this retrospective study, open neck injury patients who were admitted to NAME University Hospital Trauma Center between December 2015 and December 2017 were analyzed for epidemiology, the mechanism of trauma, the injured organ, complications, and mortality.
Results
Thirty-two patients presented with open neck injuries. All patients underwent computed tomographic angiography to evaluate their injuries once their vital signs stabilized. Among these patients, 27 required surgical treatment. The most commonly injured organ was the airway. There were five deaths, and the main cause of death was bleeding. Mortality was associated with the initial systolic blood pressure at the hospital and Glasgow Coma Scale.
Conclusions
Mortality from open neck injuries was associated with initial systolic blood pressure at the hospital and Glasgow Coma Scale.
Summary
Case Reports
Successful management of a common carotid artery injury using a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt: a case report
Kang Kook Choi, Jayun Cho, Min A Lee, Soo Min Eun, Yang Bin Jeon
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(Suppl 1):S3-S7.   Published online May 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0032
  • 1,926 View
  • 74 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrating neck injuries are a surgical challenge. In particular, penetrating neck injuries associated with carotid artery injuries have a high mortality rate. Overt external hemorrhage is unanimously considered as an indication for surgical exploration. The authors present a case of successful surgical management for a penetrating common carotid artery injury using a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt (LeMaitre Vascular Inc., Burlington, MA, USA) in a 60-year-old male patient who was transferred to the level 1 trauma center due to a metal fragment piercing his neck while working. Active pulsatile bleeding was observed from the 3-cm-long external wound on the anterior neck in zone II. Emergent neck exploration showed near-total transection of the left common carotid artery just below the carotid bifurcation. After a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt was applied to the injured carotid artery as a temporary vascular shunt, artificial graft interposition was performed for the injured common carotid artery. The patient experienced cerebral infarction as a complication caused by ischemia-reperfusion of the common carotid artery but was discharged in a suitable state for rehabilitation therapy.
Summary
A case report of “minor” trauma leading to a major disability: whiplash-associated dysphagia, dysphonia, and dysgeusia
Ami Schattner, Yair Glick
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(2):115-117.   Published online May 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0043
  • 2,377 View
  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
“Whiplash”-type injuries are commonly encountered and often cause neck pain, neck stiffness, and headaches. However, these injuries can have rare and poorly recognized complications, such as the development of a prevertebral hematoma leading to acute respiratory failure in the emergency department, followed by severe, life-threatening dysphagia and recurrent aspirations. In the patient described herein, a whiplash injury was accompanied by vocal cord paralysis and dysphonia (vagus nerve), dysgeusia (glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve), and upper esophageal spasm (cricopharyngeal muscle, vagus nerve). It is unlikely that this was a complication of cervical fusion surgery. Instead, a combined stretch-induced lower cranial nerve injury, possibly on the exit of these nerves through the jugular foramen, seems to be a likely, but underappreciated mechanism occurring in rare instances of whiplash injuries.
Summary
Life-Threatening Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Posterior Neck
Ji-An Choi, Jung-Ha Kwak, Chung-Min Yoon
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(4):260-263.   Published online November 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0025
  • 3,537 View
  • 60 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection of the subcutaneous tissue that results in destruction of the fascia and is disproportionately common in patients with chronic liver disease or diabetes. Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is rare, but has a high fatality rate. A 50-year-old man with a past medical history of diabetes reported a chief complaint of a wound in the posterior neck due to trauma. The wound had grown and was accompanied by pus and redness, and the patient had a fever. When the patient was referred to department of plastic & reconstructive surgery, the sternocleidomastoid muscle, semispinalis capitis muscle, splenius capitis muscle, and trapezius muscles were exposed, and the size of the defect was about 25×20 cm. Dead tissue resection was performed before negative-pressure wound therapy, followed by a split-thickness skin graft (STSG). After a 2-week course of aseptic dressing post-STSG, the patient recovered completely. No postoperative complications were observed for 1 year. Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening, rapidly spreading infection, requiring early diagnosis and active surgical treatment. In addition, broad-spectrum antibiotics are required due to the variety of types of causative bacteria. Broad necrotizing fasciitis of the posterior neck is rare, but can quickly progress into a life-threatening stage.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Reconstruction of cervical necrotizing fasciitis defect with the modified keystone flap technique: Two case reports
    Wonseok Cho, Eun A Jang, Kyu Nam Kim
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2024; 12(7): 1305.     CrossRef
  • Posterior cervical necrotising fasciitis: a multidisciplinary endeavour in surgery
    Jia Hui Lee, Fung Joon Foo, Allen Wei-Jiat Wong
    Journal of Surgical Case Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Exceptionally Unusual Case of a Self-Inflicted Suicidal Cut Throat Injury
Mezhuneituo Raleng, Anant Prakash Pore, Temsula Alinger
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):134-137.   Published online June 5, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.043
  • 18,384 View
  • 133 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Here we present a 43-year-old man who was brought with a self-inflicted cut throat injury; 18 hours after the suicidal attempt. On examination a deep 12 cm cut at the level of the hyoid bone exposing the posterior pharyngeal wall was seen. Emergency surgery with primary repair, tracheostomy and feeding gastrostomy was done. Post-operative period was uneventful and patient recovered without any speech or swallowing abnormalities. Through this article we would like to stress that even in cases of frightening ghastly wounds, by maintaining simple surgical principles we can achieve good outcomes.

Summary
Original Article
Clinical Analysis of the Patients with Isolated Low-Velocity Penetrating Neck Injury
Junepill Seok, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(1):1-5.   Published online April 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.1.1
  • 3,536 View
  • 70 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Although there has been substantial progress for the treatment of thoracic trauma, the mortality of the penetrating neck injury is still high, has been reported about 10?15%. However, there has not been a report which is reflecting Korean medical present. We retrospectively analyzed the penetrating neck injury patients based on the Korean Trauma Data Base.

Methods

Between December 2013 and June 2017 at the trauma center of the Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea, total of 36 patients with isolated low-velocity penetrating neck injuries were included. We analyzed the patients’ age, gender, injury mechanism and causes by medical chart review.

Results

Among total of 36 patients, 26 (72.2%) were male and 10 (27.8%) were female. Homicidal neck injuries were most common, followed by accidental and suicidal injuries (47% vs. 33% vs. 19%, respectively). All penetrating injuries in our study were low-velocity trauma such as following: knife (n=16, 44.4%); glass or glass bottle (n=11, 30.6%); scissors (n=4, 11.1%); grinder (n=2, 5.6%); and three (8.3%) of miscellaneous injuries. Twenty-seven (75.0%) patients underwent emergency surgery, and only one (2.8%) patient underwent elective surgery. Eleven (30.6) patients were diagnosed with superficial injuries, including six patients who had conservative treatment. Twelve (33.3%) patients had arterial injuries and 10 (27.8%) patients had venous injuries. The patients who had deep injuries showed significant difference against the patient with superficial injury (98.0 vs. 129.1, p=0.008).

Conclusions

Low velocity penetrating injury confined to the neck is able to be successfully treated with prompt surgical management. Regardless of the conditions which are evaluated at emergency department, all penetrating neck injury patients should be regarded as urgent surgical candidates.

Summary
Case Reports
Stent Graft Repair of Penetrated Injury of the Common Carotid Artery
Soon Jin Kim, Sang Woo Ryu, Jaykey Chekar, Yong Tae Kim, Bo Ra Seo
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(4):172-175.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.4.172
  • 1,831 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrated injury of common carotid artery (CCA) is rare and extremely lethal. Carotid artery injury tends to bleed actively and potentially occlude the trachea. It can cause fatal neurological complications. An accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment are very needed to the successful outcome of the penetrating vascular injury in zone 1, 2, and 3 of the neck. Open surgical treatment is more invasive and complicated than endovascular treatment. We experienced a case with penetrating injury in neck zone 2. Here, we report the case successfully treated with endovascular stent graft technique.
Summary
Wound Probing in Neck Trauma Patients
Jin Bong Ye, Young Hoon Sul, Yun Su Mun, Seung Je Go, Oh Sang Kwon, Gwan Woo Ku, Min Koo Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):198-201.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.198
  • 1,719 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Neck trauma is a relatively uncommon but can be a life-threatening injury. Several guidelines for neck trauma is established to recommend a proper management such as no clamping of bleeding vessels, no probing of wounds, Trendelenberg position for preventing venous air embolism. Here, we present a regretful case of 49-year-old man with neck trauma presenting undesired bleeding after probing of wound, and then discuss about treatment guildeline for neck trauma with a review.
Summary
Penetrating Neck Trauma: A Case of Spinal Cord Injury by Embedded Scissor
Seon Hee Kim, Sun Woo Choi, Sung Jin Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Chang Wan Kim, Sang Bong Lee, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(2):71-74.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.2.71
  • 2,746 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrating neck trauma involving spinal cord injury is relatively uncommon, but can be life-threatening. We report a case of 59-year-old female who presented with hypotension after stab injury self-inflicted with a scissor to her neck. Although Open removal of the scissor and control of bleeding were successfully done, penetration of spinal cord resulted in a neurologic impairment.
Summary
Original Article
Comparison between Two Kirschner Wire Fixation and Three Wire Fixation, in Treating of Metacarpal Neck Fracture Using Multiple Retrograde Kirschner Wire Fixation
Sang Ho Kwak, Young Ho Lee, Gil Joon Seo, Goo Hyun Baek
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(2):55-59.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.2.55
  • 1,620 View
  • 4 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
To compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of between two and three Kirschner wire(K-wire) intramedullary fixation for fractures in the neck of the metacarpal bone.
METHODS
A single institutional retrospective review identified 28 cases of metacarpal fractures between March 2010 and August 2014. Each of the cases met the inclusion criteria for closed, extra-articular fractures of the neck of the metacarpal bone. The patient groups were divided by the number of K-wire. Outcomes were compared for range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal joint, radiographic parameters, and period until union.
RESULTS
The fractures were treated with either 2 Kirschner wire fixation (n=10) or 3 Kirschner wire fixation (n=18). The active range of motion of metacarpophalangeal joint and radiographic result showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean union period was 5.9 weeks. However, four cases suffered distal head perforation in 2 K-wire fixation group and one case in 3 K-wire fixation group.
CONCLUSION
Multiple retrograde intramedullary Kirschner wire fixation is a good treatment of choice for fractures in the neck of the metacarpal bone. To prevent metacarpal head perforation, it is preferred to use three K-wires than two K-wires.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors affecting healing following percutaneous intramedullary fixation of metacarpal fractures
    Chul-Ho Kim, Dong Hwan Kim, Han-Vit Kang, Won Jun Kim, Minkyu Shin, Ji Wan Kim
    Medicine.2021; 100(50): e27968.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Emergency Repair Using Cervico-median Sternotomy for Cervicothoracic Penetrating Injury
Hyun Joo Lee, Hyun Koo Kim, Young Ho Choi
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2008;21(2):136-139.
  • 1,315 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A great variety of penetrating injuries is happening due to the increasing population and violence today. An optimal surgical approach is the key factor for successful repair of a complicated penetrating injury. A 23-yearold woman fell down the stairs from the second floor and received cervico-thoracic penetration injury due to a metalic bar. The metalic bar ruptured the right jugular vein and penetrated the left upper and lower lung. Under cervico-median sternotomy, neck vessels were repaired and the left thorax was successfully entered to repair the damaged lung through the mediastinal pleura. With this approach, the patient's position did not need to be changed during operation, while reduced the operation time compared to the conventional approach (cervical incision and standard thoracotomy).
Summary
A Case Study of a Patient with Penetrating Neck Injuries caused by a Nail Gun
Jong Soon Han, You Dong Sohn, Ji Yoon Ahn, Hee Cheol Ahn, Hyuk Sool Kwon, Gang Yeol Seo, Kwang Yun Cho, Seung Min Park
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(1):48-51.
  • 1,334 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Powered by compressed air, a nail gun is an essential alternative tool to a hammer on any construction site. This useful machine launches nails at high speed, automatically embedding them in a piece of wood in only a fraction of a second. In spite of its convenience, life-threatening and fatal nail gun injuries can occur when a nail gun is misused, such as in a suicide attempt, or when the operator has insufficient training because combustion nail guns are capable of firing projectiles at velocities higher than 150 m per second. Although injuries by nail guns are rarely reported, there have been reports of nail gun injuries to the head and the trachea in Korea. In the emergency room, the authors experienced a patient injured by an accidental shooting of a nail gun while working in construction. In that accident, a nail penetrated the patient's cervical vertebra through the left cheek. This report is aimed at studying medical treatment for patients with penetrating injuries caused by nail guns.
Summary
Original Article
Clinical Analysis of Patients with Abdomen or Neck-penetrating Trauma
Ha Ny Noh, Kwang Min Kim, Joon Beom Park, Hoon Ryu, Keum Seok Bae, Seong Joon Kang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):107-112.
  • 1,176 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Recently, the change to a more complex social structure has led to an increased frequency of traumas due to violence, accident and so on. In addition, the severity of the traumas and the frequency of penetrating injuries have also increased. Traumas to cervical and abdominal areas, what are commonly seen by general surgeons, can have mild to fatal consequences because in these areas, various organs that are vital to sustaining life are located. The exact location and characteristics of the injury are vital to treating patients with the trauma to these areas. Thus, with this background in mind, we studied, compared, and analyzed clinical manifestations of patients who were admitted to Wonju Christian hospital for penetrating injuries inflicted by themselves or others.
METHODS
We selected and performed a retrospective study of 64 patients who had been admitted to Wonju Christian Hospital from January 2005 to December 2009 and who had cervical or abdominal penetrating injuries clearly inflicted by themselves or others.
RESULTS
There were 51 male (79.7%) and 13 female (20.3%) patients, and the number of male patients was more dominant in this study, having a sex ratio of 3.9 to 1. The range of ages was between 20 and 86 years, and mean age was 43.2 years. There were 5 self-inflicted cervical injuries, and 19 self-inflicted abdominal injuries, making the total number of self-inflicted injury 24. Cervical and abdominal injuries caused by others were found in 11 and 29 patients, respectively. The most common area involved in self-inflicted injuries to the abdomen was the epigastric area, nine cases, and the right-side zone II was the most commonly involved area. On the other hand, in injuries inflicted by others, the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was the most common site of the injury, 14 cases. In the neck, the left-side zone II was the most injured site. In cases of self-inflicted neck injury, jugular vein damage and cervical muscle damage without deep organ injury were observed in two cases each, making them the most common. In cases with abdominal injuries, seven cases had limited abdominal wall injury, making it the most common injury. The most common deep organ injury was small bowel wounds, five cases. In patients with injuries caused by others, six had cervical muscle damage, making it the most common injury found in that area. In the abdomen, small bowel injury was found to be the most common injury, being evidenced in 13 cases. In self-inflicted injuries, a statistical analysis discovered that the total duration of admission and the number of patients admitted to the intensive care unit were significantly shorter and smaller, retrospectively, than in the patient group that had injuries caused by others. No statistically significant difference was found when the injury sequels were compared between the self-inflicted-injury and the injury-inflicted-by-others groups.
CONCLUSION
This study revealed that, in self-inflicted abdominal injuries, injuries limited to the abdominal wall were found to be the most common, and in injuries to the cervical area inflicted by others, injuries restricted to the cervical muscle were found to be the most common. As a whole, the total duration of admission and the ICU admission time were significantly shorter in cases of self-inflicted injury. Especially, in cases of self inflicted injuries, abdominal injuries generally had a limited degree of injury. Thus, in our consideration, accurate injury assessment and an ideal treatment plan are necessary to treat these patients, and minimally invasive equipment, such as laparoscope, should be used. Also, further studies that persistently utilize aggressive surgical observations, such as abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography, for patients with penetrating injuries are needed.
Summary
Case Reports
A Case of Hypopharyngeal Perforation in a Trauma Patient on Ventilatory Support
Kwon Jae Park, Chang Min Park, Sang Seok Jung, Jung Hee Bang
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(3):75-78.
  • 1,080 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hypopharyngeal perforation is a rare, but fatal, complication. Clinical signs and symptoms of this condition are neck pain, odynophagia, dysphagia, fever, vomiting, cervical swelling and subcutaneous emphysema. However, these signs are obscured in patient suffering from severe trauma who has had an endotracheal tube inserted, which delay proper evaluation and treatment. Here, we report a case of hypopharyngeal perforation in a trauma patient who had an endotracheal tube inserted for mechanical ventilation.
Summary
A Case of a Traumatic Pancreatic Neck Transection Treated with a Binding Pancreaticogastrostomy
Young Hoon Sul, Sang Il Lee, Kwang Sik Cheon, In Sang Song
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(1):18-21.
  • 1,135 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma is rare, but it has high morbidity and mortality. Various treatments have been attempted, but none has yet been clearly established. The pancreatic neck transection is usually managed by using a distal pancreatectomy with or without a splenectomy. However, pancreatic insufficiency and the risk of post-splenectomy infection remain significant problems. To avoid these problems in patients with a pancreatic neck transection, one may use a pancreaticoenteric anastomosis as a treatment option, but a pancreatic fistula from the pancreaticoenteric anastomosis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Recently, several reports proposed the binding pancreaticogastrostomy to minimize the possibility of a postoperative pancreatic fistula developing after pancreatic surgery. Thus, we report a case of a traumatic pancreatic neck transection successfully treated with a binding pancreaticogastrostomy.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury