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5 "Inferior vena cava"
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Case Reports
Treatment of a penetrating inferior vena cava injury using doctor-helicopter emergency medical service and direct-to-operating room resuscitation in Korea: a case report
Dongmin Seo, Jieun Kim, Jiwon Kim, Inhae Heo, Jonghwan Moon, Kyoungwon Jung, Hohyung Jung
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):74-78.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0055
  • 783 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries can have fatal outcomes and are associated with high mortality rates. Patients with IVC injuries require multiple procedures, including prehospital care, surgical techniques, and postoperative care. We present the case of a 67-year-old woman who stabbed herself in the abdomen with a knife, resulting in an infrarenal IVC injury. We shortened the transfer time by transporting the patient using a helicopter and decided to perform direct-to-operating room resuscitation by a trauma physician in the helicopter. The patient underwent laparotomy with IVC ligation for damage control during the first operation. The second- and third-look operations, including previous suture removal, IVC reconstruction, and IVC thrombectomy, were performed by a trauma surgeon specializing in cardiovascular diseases. The patient was discharged without major complications on the 19th postoperative day with rivaroxaban as an anticoagulant medication. Computed tomography angiography at the outpatient clinic showed that thrombi in the IVC and both iliac veins had been completely removed. Patients with IVC injuries can be effectively treated using a trauma system that includes fast transportation by helicopter, damage control for rapid hemostasis, and expert treatment of IVC injuries.
Summary
Bleeding control of an injury to the infrarenal inferior vena cava and right external iliac vein by ipsilateral internal iliac artery and superficial femoral vein ligation after blunt abdominal trauma in Korea: a case report
Hoonsung Park, Maru Kim, Dae Sang Lee, Tae Hwa Hong, Doo-Hun Kim, Hang joo Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):441-446.   Published online November 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0019
  • 570 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries, while accounting for fewer than 0.5% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, are among the most difficult to manage. Despite advancements in prehospital care, transportation, operative techniques, and perioperative management, the mortality rate for IVC injuries has remained at 20% to 66% for several decades. Furthermore, 30% to 50% of patients with IVC injuries succumb during the prehospital phase. A 65-year-old male patient, who had been struck in the back by a 500-kg excavator shovel at a construction site, was transported to a regional trauma center. Injuries to the right side of the infrarenal IVC and the right external iliac vein (EIV) were suspected, along with fractures to the right iliac bone and sacrum. The injury to the right side of the infrarenal IVC wall was repaired, and the right internal iliac artery was ligated. However, persistent bleeding around the right EIV was observed, and we were unable to achieve proximal and distal control of the right EIV. Attempts at prolonged manual compression were unsuccessful. To decrease venous return, we ligated the right superficial femoral vein. This reduced the amount of bleeding, enabling us to secure the surgical field. We ultimately controlled the bleeding, and approximately 5 L of blood products were infused intraoperatively. A second-look operation was performed 2 days later, by which time most of the bleeding sites had ceased. Orthopedic surgeons then took over the operation, performing closed reduction and external fixation. Five days later, the patient underwent definitive fixation and was transferred for rehabilitation on postoperative day 22.
Summary
Original Article
Experience of surgical treatments for abdominal inferior vena cava injuries in a regional trauma center in Korea
Jin Woo Park, Dong Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):105-113.   Published online June 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0001
  • 1,126 View
  • 66 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries are a rare type of traumatic abdominal injuries that are challenging to treat and have a very high mortality rate. This study described our experience with the surgical treatment of traumatic IVC injuries, and we investigated the demographics, clinical profiles, and surgical outcomes of cases at a regional trauma center.
Methods
Among the 16 patients who were treated for a traumatic IVC injury between January 2014 and March 2022, 14 underwent surgery. The surgical outcomes included overall mortality and 24-hour mortality, and we investigated the factors associated with these surgical outcomes. The 14 patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the IVC injury (retrohepatic IVC or higher vs. subhepatic IVC), and differences between the two groups were analyzed.
Results
A body mass index (BMI) >23.0 kg/m2 (P=0.046), an elevated serum lactate level (P=0.043), and a shorter operation time (P=0.016) were associated with overall mortality. A higher BMI (P=0.050), high serum lactate level (P=0.004), shorter operation time (P=0.005), and an injury at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level (P=0.031) were associated with 24-hour mortality. Younger age (P=0.028), higher BMI (P=0.005), an acidic pH (P=0.028), high lactatemia (P=0.012), a higher hemoglobin level (P=0.012), and shorter door-to-operating room time (P=0.028) were associated with injury at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level. Patients with subhepatic IVC injuries had a high rate of direct repair (75.0%) and a significantly lower 24-hour mortality rate (37.5%, P=0.031).
Conclusions
Subhepatic IVC injuries are easy to access and are usually treated with a direct repair method. Injuries at the retrohepatic IVC or higher level are difficult to treat surgically and require a systematic and multidisciplinary treatment strategy.
Summary
Case Reports
Extensive Inferior Vena Cava Injury Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report
Young Sun Yoo, Seong Pyo Mun
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):219-223.
  • 1,121 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic injuries of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are the most challenging lesions in abdominal vascular injuries and are associated with a high mortality rate. Although endovascular treatment has been addressed in the management of vascular trauma, surgery is the mainstay in the treatment for IVC injury as an endovascular technique for the venous system has not been developed. We report a case of successful surgical repair of an extensive IVC laceration following a fall.
Summary
Balloon Angioplasty for Budd-Chiari Syndrome Resulting from Primary Repair of an Inferior Vena Cava Injury
Joohyun Sim, Je Hwan Won, Kyoungwon Jung, Cook John Lee, Young Hwan Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):196-200.
  • 1,213 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by hepatic outflow obstruction. Direct suture of the injured Inferior vena cava in a patient with blunt hepatic trauma also may cause an equivalent condition. However, early diagnosis is possible with common symptoms and radiologic evaluation. Moreover, a transluminal approach with balloon angioplasty could prevent long-term complications of Budd-Chiari syndrome without repeated abdominal surgery.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury