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Case Reports
Sphenoid sinus foreign body following airbag deployment in the United States: a case report
Birk J. Olson, Joseph B. Vella, Justin P. McCormick
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):133-136.   Published online August 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0030
  • 2,250 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
We report a unique case of penetrating foreign bodies following a motor vehicle accident with airbag deployment. The patient presented with evidence of facial trauma and was found to have three retained foreign bodies on imaging. Notably, one foreign body was within the sphenoid sinus. This foreign body was removed uneventfully through endoscopic sinus surgery. The patient was doing well at follow-up visits. We concluded that the foreign bodies were steering wheel accessories, which detached upon airbag deployment and penetrated the patient’s face. This case report is intended to inform the public regarding the dangers of placing accessories on a steering wheel.
Summary
Visual Disturbance Caused by a Nail Gun-Induced Penetrating Brain Injury
Jin Bong Ye, Young Hoon Sul, Se Heon Kim, Jin Young Lee, Jin Suk Lee, Hong Rye Kim, Soo Young Yoon, Jung Hee Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):203-207.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0030
  • 2,372 View
  • 64 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Penetrating brain injury caused by a nail gun is an uncommon clinical scenario reported in the literature. A 36-year-old male presented with a nail that had penetrated through the occipital bone. He was alert and neurologically intact except for visual disturbance. Computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed the nail lodged at the occipital lobe and the parietal lobe, with minimal intracerebral hemorrhage. The nail was placed in the occipital lobe close to the superior sagittal sinus. We removed the nail with craniotomy since the entrance of the nail was close to the superior sagittal sinus. There were no newly developed neurological deficits postoperatively. Immediate postoperative CT showed no newly developed lesions. The patient recovered well without any significant complications. Two weeks postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging showed no remarkable lesions. The visual disturbance was followed up at the outpatient department. To summarize, we report a rare case of penetrating head injury by a nail gun and discuss relevant aspects of the clinical management.

Summary
Chronic Traumatic Glass Foreign Body Removal from the Lung through a Direct Parenchymal Incision
Su Young Yoon, Si Wook Kim, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Young Lee, Jin Bong Ye, Se Heon Kim, Young Hoon Sul
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(4):248-251.   Published online December 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.031
  • 3,828 View
  • 56 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Traumatic intrapulmonary glass foreign bodies that are missed on an initial examination can migrate and lead to severe complications. Here, we present a rare case of a traumatic intrapulmonary glass foreign body surgically removed by a direct pulmonary incision, which preserved the pulmonary parenchyma and avoided severe complications caused by migration.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Thoracoscopic retrieval of an intrapulmonary sewing needle: A case report
    Houssem Messaoudi, Imen Ben Ismail, Wafa Ragmoun, Hatem Lahdhili, Saber Hachicha, Slim Chenik
    Clinical Case Reports.2020; 8(12): 2494.     CrossRef
The Successful Removal of a Foreign Body in the Spleen via Diaphragm Laceration Site by Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery
Yang Bin Jeon, Sung Youl Hyun, Dae Sung Ma
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(2):122-125.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.055
  • 3,065 View
  • 80 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

A 73-year-old man, who, in an inebriated state, had slipped in a flowerbed and was wounded on the left flank, was transferred to Trauma Center, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University College of Medicine. Based on the chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography, he was diagnosed with multiple rib fractures and hemopneumothorax on the left hemithorax and was found to have a bony fragment in the spleen. He had not presented peritonitis and exsanguinous symptoms during the observation period. Seven days later, computed tomography of the abdomen showed suspected diaphragmatic injury and a retained foreign body in the spleen. On exploration by video assisted thoracoc surgery (VATS), a herniated omentum through the lacerated site of the diaphragm was observed. After omentectomy using Endo Gia, the foreign body in the spleen was observed through the lacerated site of the diaphragm. Traumatic diaphragm rupture with a foreign body, in the spleen, was successfully managed by video assisted thoracic surgery via the lacerated site of the diaphragm.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The role of VATS in the removal of intrathoracic foreign bodies — a systematic review
    Fahmi Hussein Kakamad, Razhan Kawa Ali, Bnar Jamal Hama Amin, Shvan Hussein Mohammed, Diyar Adnan Omar, Karukh Khalid Mohammed, Sanaa Othman Karim, Suhaib Hussein Kakamad, Rawezh Qadir Mohammed Salih, Diyar Abubaker Mohammed, Abdulwahid Mohammed Salih, Mo
    Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surg.2023; 39(2): 125.     CrossRef
Original Article
Clinical Analysis of Ocular Trauma Induced by Lawn Trimmers
In Gu Kang, Cheol Sang Park, Hyun Sik Ryu, Sok Jin Heo, Youn Sok Chae, Hyun Jin Kim, Seong Soo Park, Mi Jin Lee, Won Joon Jeong
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):61-67.
  • 1,180 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Lawn trimmers are widely used to cut the weeds around graves in South Korea, but they can cause ocular injury. We investigate at the emergency room the incidence and the clinical features of ocular trauma induced by lawn trimmers.
METHODS
The authors analyzed 106 patients who visited Konyang University Hospital's emergency room from March 1, 2007, to October 31, 2011, because of ocular trauma caused by a lawn trimmer. Patients were sorted into two groups, severe ocular injury and mild ocular injury.
RESULTS
Over a 5-year period, 106 patients with ocular trauma caused by a lawn trimmer underwent clinical study. Most of the patient (103 patients) were males, and the average age of the patients was 51.75+/-11.66 years. The incidence of ocular trauma peaked in the sixth decade of life. Most injuries occurred between July and September. Severe ocular injury developed in 46.2% of all patients. As age increased, so did the severity of the ocular injury. The impacting object was a small stone in 43.4% of all patients. Nobody wore protective gear. The most common diagnosis were corneal abrasion, followed by intraocular foreign body, corneal laceration, and sclera laceration. Fifty-four patients were followed up, and thirty-six patients of them had severe injury. The most common complication was a traumatic cataract.
CONCLUSION
Ocular trauma induced by a lawn trimmer is more severe than general ocular trauma. We suggest that everyone using a lawn trimmer should wear protective gear and follow safety guidelines.
Summary
Case Report
A Case of Successful Endoscopic and Conservative Treatment for Intentional Ingestion of Sharp Foreign Bodies in the Alimentary Tract
Jong Min Park, Seong Yup Kim, Il Yong Chung, Woo Shik Kim, Yong Chul Shin, Yeong Cheol Kim, Sei Hyeog Park
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):304-307.
  • 1,124 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Food bolus impaction is the most common cause of esophageal foreign body obstruction in adults. Other causes include intentional ingestion in psychiatric patients or prison inmates. We experienced successful treatment of a patient with intentional ingestion of multiple sharp foreign bodies(25 cutter and razor fragments). A 47-year-old male patient who was suffering from chronic alcoholism was admitted, via the emergency room, with dysphagia and neck pain. He was suffering from alcoholic liver cirrhosis and psychiatric problems, such as chronic alcoholism, anxiety disorder and insomnia. The patient had intended to leave the hospital after having swallowed the sharp objects. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan showed multiple, scattered metal fragments in the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed one impacted blade in the upper esophagus using by a snare with an overtube. The rest of the fragments had already passed through the pylorus, so we could not find them with endoscopy. We checked the patient with simple abdominal radiographs and careful physical examinations every day. All remaining fragments were uneventfully excreted through stool during the patient's 6 day hospital stay. Finally, we were able to confirm the presence of the objects in the stool, and radiographs were negative. The patient was discharged without complications after 14 days hospital stay and then was followed by the Department of Psychiatry.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury