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Case Report
Various injury patterns due to combustion (typical but unfamiliar to physicians and easy to miss) in Korea: a case report
Hyung Il Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):393-398.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0060
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  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Patients transported from fire sites may exhibit various injury patterns. Major trauma, skin burn, inhalation burn, and carbon monoxide poisoning are typical injuries. However, most physicians may be unfamiliar that cyanide poisoning can frequently occur due to combustion. Cyanide poisoning is highly significant owing to high mortality and the existence of antidotes. I present a 35-year-old man who was transported from a burning building and suffered severe metabolic acidosis despite no major bleeding as well as mild carbon monoxide poisoning. I suspected cyanide poisoning and administered the antidote; subsequently, the patient showed improvement. The next day, sudden airway obstruction developed, and emergency endotracheal intubation was performed. The inhalation damage was detected only in the lower airway tract and not in the upper airway. Physicians should be aware of cyanide poisoning and inhalation burn to avoid missing treatment opportunities.
Summary
Original Articles
Analysis of Exposure Factors for Clinical and Preventive Aspects of Pediatric Electrical Burn Patients who Visited the Emergency Department
Sang Jun Park, Sung Wook Kim, Won Jung Jeong, Sang Hoon Oh, Jeong Taek Park
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):170-176.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.170
  • 1,824 View
  • 5 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The aims of this study were to discuss treatment and prevention under the age of 18 to identify the characteristics of the electrical burn patients.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 97 patients with under age 18 of electric burn who were treated in emergency department of quarterly over 10,000 targets within the desired hospital for evaluation of electrical injuries between January 1, 2009 and December, 2013. We investigated age, gender, injury mechanism, season, degree of burn, surface of burn, complication, blood test, and voltage, kind of current.
RESULTS
Of the patients, 50 (50.5%) patients were in the first degree burn and 47 (49.5%) patients were in second degree burn. 68 (70.1%) patients had electric burn at home. 75 (85.2%) of 88 patients had normal sinus rhythm and other 13 people showed a RBBB, VPC, sinus bradycardia, sinus tachycardia. 41 (42.3) of 97 patients were in infants and 26 (26.8%) patients were in adolescence.
CONCLUSION
The results of this study emphasize the need for prevention of electricity at home for childhood and education of the adolescence.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Case of Resuscitation of an Electrocuted Child by a 119 Paramedic
    Jae-Min Lee, Dae-Won Kim, Hyeong-Wan Yun
    Fire Science and Engineering.2020; 34(4): 135.     CrossRef
Clinical Effect of Immediate Cooling on Superficial Second Degree Thermal Burns
Hii Sun Jeong, Hye Kyung Lee, Hyung Suk Kim, Keuk Shun Shin
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):227-232.
  • 992 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Numerous experimental studies have shown the benefits of treating thermal burns by cooling. Nevertheless, few studies have shown the clinical effect of cooling therapy on thermal burns. This study aimed to identify the clinical effect of immediate cooling therapy.
METHODS
The research was conducted as a retrospective, case-control study. All patients had thermal injuries characterized as a superficial second-degree burn. In the cooling group, 14 patients had first-aid cooling therapy delivered by either parents, caregivers, general practitioners, local hospitals, and/or Myongji hospital. Included in the study were 22 control patients who were not treated with any cooling therapies. Other clinical factors, such as age, sex, cause of burn injury, and burn area (Total Body Surface Area %), were taken into consideration. The duration of treatment was defined as the time from the occurrence of the injury to the presence of complete re-epithelialization, as confirmed by two surgeons.
RESULTS
The duration of treatment in the cooling group was significantly less than that the control group (p < 0.05).
CONCLUSION
Cooling therapy as an initial emergent treatment is clinically effective for superficial seconddegree burn injuries.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury