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J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

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3 "Brain injuries, traumatic"
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Original Article
Characteristics of injuries associated with electric personal mobility devices: a nationwide cross-sectional study in South Korea
Maro Kim, Dongbum Suh, Jin Hee Lee, Hyuksool Kwon, Yujin Choi, Joo Jeong, Sola Kim, Soyun Hwang, Joong Wan Park, You Hwan Jo
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(1):3-11.   Published online October 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0044
  • 16,669 View
  • 119 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The increasing use of electric personal mobility devices (ePMDs) has been accompanied by an increasing incidence of associated accidents. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of ePMD-related injuries and their associated factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance database from 2014 to 2018. All patients who were injured while operating an ePMD were eligible. The primary outcome was the rate of severe injury, defined as an excess mortality ratio-adjusted Injury Severity Score of ≥25. We calculated the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of outcomes associated with ePMD-related injuries. Results: Of 1,391,980 injured patients, 684 (0.05%) were eligible for inclusion in this study. Their median age was 28 years old, and most injuries were sustained by men (68.0%). The rate of ePMD-related injuries increased from 3.1 injuries per 100,000 population in 2014 to 100.3 per 100,000 population in 2018. A majority of the injuries occurred on the street (32.7%). The most commonly injured area was the head and face (49.6%), and the most common diagnosis was superficial injuries or contusions (32.9%). Being aged 55 years or older (AOR=3.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33–11.36) and operating an ePMD while intoxicated (AOR=2.78; 95% CI 1.52–5.08) were associated with severe injuries. Conclusions: The number of emergency room visits due to ePMD-related injuries is increasing. Old age and drunk driving are both associated with serious injuries. Active traffic enforcement and safety regulations regarding ePMDs should be implemented to prevent severe injuries caused by ePMD-related accidents.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Types of injuries caused by isolated electric scooter accidents
    Kyongwon Yoo, Hyung Il Kim
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2022; 35(4): 232.     CrossRef
Case Report
Experiences of Emergency Surgical Treatment for a COVID-19 Patient with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury at a Regional Trauma Center: A Case Report
Jung-Ho Yun
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):212-217.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0073
  • 3,204 View
  • 72 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Various medical scenarios have arisen with the prolonged coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In particular, the increasing number of asymptomatic COVID-19 patients has prompted reports of emergency surgical experiences with these patients at regional trauma centers. In this report, we describe an example. A 25-year-old male was admitted to the emergency room after a traffic accident. The patient presented with stuporous mentality, and his vital signs were in the normal range. Lacerations were observed in the left eyebrow area and preauricular area, with hemotympanum in the right ear. Brain computed tomography showed a contusional hemorrhage in the right frontal area and an epidural hematoma in the right temporal area with a compound, comminuted fracture and depressed skull bone. Surgical treatment was planned, and the patient was intubated to prepare for surgery. A blood transfusion was prepared, and a central venous catheter was secured. The initial COVID-19 test administered upon presentation to the emergency room had a positive result, and a confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was administered. The PCR test confirmed a positive result. Emergency surgical treatment was performed because the patient’s consciousness gradually deteriorated. The risk of infection was high due to the open and unclean wounds in the skull and brain. We prepared and divided the COVID-19 surgical team, including the patient’s transportation team, anesthesia team, and surgical preparation team, for successful surgery without any transmission or morbidity. The patient recovered consciousness after the operation, received close monitoring, and did not show any deterioration due to COVID-19.

Summary
Original Article
Cranioplasty Results after the Use of a Polyester Urethane Dural Substitute (Neuro-Patch®) as an Adhesion Prevention Material in Traumatic Decompressive Craniectomy
Tae Seok Jeong, Woo Kyung Kim, Myung Jin Jang
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(4):195-201.   Published online December 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.030
  • 3,516 View
  • 84 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

This study was conducted to investigate the usefulness of a polyester urethane dural substitute (Neuro-Patch®, B. Braun, Boulogne, France) as an anti-adhesion agent in subsequent cranioplasty by analyzing the use of Neuro-Patch® during decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury patients.

Methods

We retrospectively analyzed patients with traumatic brain injury who underwent decompressive craniectomy followed by cranioplasty from January 2015 to December 2018. Patients were analyzed according to whether they received treatment with Neuro-Patch® or not (Neuro-Patch® group, n=71; control group, n=55). Patients’ baseline characteristics were analyzed to identify factors that could affect cranioplasty results, including age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, use of antiplatelet agents or anticoagulant medication, the interval between craniectomy and cranioplasty, and the type of bone used in cranioplasty. The cranioplasty results were analyzed according to the following factors: operation time, blood loss, postoperative hospitalization period, surgical site infection, and revision surgery due to extra-axial hematoma.

Results

No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding patients’ baseline characteristics. For the cranioplasty procedures, the operation time (155 vs. 190 minutes, p=0.003), intraoperative blood loss (350 vs. 450 mL, p=0.012), and number of surgical site infections (4 vs. 11 cases, p=0.024) were significantly lower in the Neuro-Patch® group than in the control group.

Conclusions

The use of Neuro-Patch® was associated with a shorter operation time, less blood loss, and a lower number of surgical site infections in subsequent cranioplasties. These results may provide a rationale for prospective studies investigating the efficacy of Neuro-Patch®.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy and safety of decompressive craniectomy with non-suture duraplasty in patients with traumatic brain injury
    Tae Seok Jeong, Gi Taek Yee, Tae Gyu Lim, Woo Kyung Kim, Chan Jong Yoo, Giovanni Grasso
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(10): e0232561.     CrossRef

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury