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J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

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2 "Airway management"
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Case Report
Submental intubation using laparoscopic trocar in zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture surgery in Korea: a case report
Hyejin Do, Chunui Lee, Hyeon Don Hong, Hyejin Hong, Hyun Kyo Lim, Sujin Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):128-132.   Published online December 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0036
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Submental intubation is an effective alternative technique for airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma. Compared with tracheostomy, it is less invasive, but has risks associated with potential airway compromise such as hypoxia due to tube obstruction, collapse, and kinking. To shorten procedure time and ensure a reinforced tube lumen, we used a laparoscopic trocar as a new device for submental intubation. A 54-year-old male patient sustained a zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture and was scheduled to undergo open reduction and internal fixation. We performed intraoral intubation and made a small 1-cm incision at the submandibular midline. After dissection of the tissue from the incision site, a reinforced tube was passed using a 12-mm laparoscopic trocar. The procedure took about 5 minutes, and apnea time from disconnecting the breathing circuit and passing through the internal lumen of the trocar until it was reconnected to the ventilator was 1 minute 5 seconds. Using a laparoscopic trocar for submental intubation can reduce the time required for dissection, prevent luminal occlusion complications due to soft tissues or blood clots in the endotracheal tube, and decrease soft tissue damage.
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Special Article
Part 3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Airway Management and Emergency Thoracotomy for Trauma Patients from the Korean Society of Traumatology
Chan Yong Park, O Hyun Kim, Sung Wook Chang, Kang Kook Choi, Kyung Hak Lee, Seong Yup Kim, Maru Kim, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(3):195-203.   Published online September 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0050
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AbstractAbstract PDF

The following key questions and recommendations are presented herein: when is airway intubation initiated in severe trauma? Airway intubation must be initiated in severe trauma patients with a GCS of 8 or lower (1B). Should rapid sequence intubation (RSI) be performed in trauma patients? RSI should be performed in trauma patients to secure the airway unless it is determined that securing the airway will be problematic (1B). What should be used as an induction drug for airway intubation? Ketamine or etomidate can be used as a sedative induction drug when RSI is being performed in a trauma patient (2B). If cervical spine damage is suspected, how is cervical protection achieved during airway intubation? When intubating a patient with a cervical spine injury, the extraction collar can be temporarily removed while the neck is fixed and protected manually (1C). What alternative method should be used if securing the airway fails more than three times? If three or more attempts to intubate the airway fail, other methods should be considered to secure the airway (1B). Should trauma patients maintain normal ventilation after intubation? It is recommended that trauma patients who have undergone airway intubation maintain normal ventilation rather than hyperventilation or hypoventilation (1C). When should resuscitative thoracotomy be considered for trauma patients? Resuscitative thoracotomy is recommended for trauma patients with penetrating injuries undergoing cardiac arrest or shock in the emergency room (1B).

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury