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Original Articles
Effect of use and type of helmet on occurrence of traumatic brain injuries in motorcycle riders in Korea: a retrospective cohort study
Sowon Seo, Seok Ran Yeom, Sung-Wook Park, Il Jae Wang, Suck Ju Cho, Wook Tae Yang, Youngmo Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):87-97.   Published online December 9, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0029
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  • 63 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the association among helmet wearing, incidence rate of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and in-hospital mortality; TBI was diagnosed when the head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) was ≥1, and as severe TBI when head AIS was ≥3; and (2) the association between helmet type and incidence rate of TBI, severe TBI, and in-hospital mortality of motorcycle accidents based on the newly revised Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance (EDIIS) data.
Methods
Data collected from EDIIS between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 were analyzed. The final study population comprised 1,910 patients, who were divided into two groups: helmet wearing group and unhelmeted group. In addition, the correlation between helmet type and motorcycle accident was determined in 596 patients who knew the exact type of helmet they wore. A total of 710 patients who wore helmet but did not know the type were excluded from this analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed in both the groups to investigate the factors affecting the primary (occurrence of TBIs) and secondary outcomes (severe TBI and in-hospital mortality).
Results
The prevalence of Injury Severity Scores, TBIs, and severe TBIs as well as in-hospital mortality were the highest in the unhelmeted group. Additionally, the results from the group that wore and knew the type of helmet worn indicated that wearing a full-face helmet decreased the incidence of TBIs in comparison to a half-face helmet.
Conclusions
The wearing of a helmet in motorcycle accidents is very important as it plays a role in reducing the occurrence of TBIs and severe TBIs and in-hospital mortality. The use of a full-face helmet lowered the incidence of TBIs.
Summary
Factors and Their Correlation with Injury Severity of Elderly Pedestrian Traffic Accidents
Tae gyu Hyun, Seok-Ran Yeom, Sung-Wook Park, Deasup Lee, Hyung bin Kim, Il Jae Wang, Byung Gwan Bae, Min keun Song, Youngmo Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(3):143-149.   Published online September 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.022
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  • 69 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

No previous study has assessed elderly pedestrian traffic accidents based on a nationwide database. This study aimed to help primary physicians who examine patients in emergency departments to determine and make prompt and accurate treatment decisions.

Methods

This study used data from the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance from 2013 to 2017, managed by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pedestrians aged ≥65 years were included, and using multivariate logistic regression multiple factors were analyzed to determine their relationship with injury severity.

Results

Of 227,695 subjects, 6,498 were included, of whom 2,065 (31.8%) were severely injured. There were more female than male patients in all severity groups. Most accidents occurred in the afternoon and on general roads. In the multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) of injury severity for male pedestrians was 1.165 (95% confidence interval: 1.034?1.313, p=0.012). Older age of patients and the use of ambulances were associated with greater injury severity. The accident time affected the degree of injury severity; i.e., compared to dawn, injury severity increased in the morning (OR: 1.246, p=0.047) and decreased at night (OR: 0.678, p<0.001). A significant difference was noted in the correlation between the type of vehicle causing the accident and the accident severity; i.e., motorcycle accidents had lower severity than bicycle accidents (OR: 0.582, p=0.047).

Conclusions

Injury severity was correlated with sex, age, transportation to the ED, TA onset time, and type of vehicle. The study results suggest that injury severity may be positively reflected in initial assessments and overall integrated treatments by physicians and in the related policies.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury