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17 "Sung Jin Park"
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Original Articles
Angioembolization performed by trauma surgeons for trauma patients: is it feasible in Korea? A retrospective study
Soonseong Kwon, Kyounghwan Kim, Soon Tak Jeong, Joongsuck Kim, Kwanghee Yeo, Ohsang Kwon, Sung Jin Park, Jihun Gwak, Wu Seong Kang
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):28-36.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0076
  • 798 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Recent advancements in interventional radiology have made angioembolization an invaluable modality in trauma care. Angioembolization is typically performed by interventional radiologists. In this study, we aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of emergency angioembolization performed by trauma surgeons.
Methods
We identified trauma patients who underwent emergency angiography due to significant trauma-related hemorrhage between January 2020 and June 2023 at our trauma center. Until May 2022, two dedicated interventional radiologists performed emergency angiography at our center. However, since June 2022, a trauma surgeon with a background and experience in vascular surgery has performed emergency angiography for trauma-related bleeding. The indications for trauma surgeon–performed angiography included significant hemorrhage from liver injury, pelvic injury, splenic injury, or kidney injury. We assessed the angiography results according to the operator of the initial angiographic procedure. The term “failure of the first angioembolization” was defined as rebleeding from any cause, encompassing patients who underwent either re-embolization due to rebleeding or surgery due to rebleeding.
Results
No significant differences were found between the interventional radiologists and the trauma surgeon in terms of re-embolization due to rebleeding, surgery due to rebleeding, or the overall failure rate of the first angioembolization. Mortality and morbidity rates were also similar between the two groups. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis evaluating failure after the first angioembolization, pelvic embolization emerged as the sole significant risk factor (adjusted odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.05–10.33; P=0.041). Trauma surgeon–performed angioembolization was not deemed a significant risk factor in the multivariable logistic regression model.
Conclusions
Trauma surgeons, when equipped with the necessary endovascular skills and experience, can safely perform angioembolization. To further improve quality control, an enhanced training curriculum for trauma surgeons is warranted.
Summary
Emergency department laparotomy for patients with severe abdominal trauma: a retrospective study at a single regional trauma center in Korea
Yu Jin Lee, Soon Tak Jeong, Joongsuck Kim, Kwanghee Yeo, Ohsang Kwon, Kyounghwan Kim, Sung Jin Park, Jihun Gwak, Wu Seong Kang
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):20-27.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0072
  • 975 View
  • 23 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Severe abdominal injuries often require immediate clinical assessment and surgical intervention to prevent life-threatening complications. In Jeju Regional Trauma Center, we have instituted a protocol for emergency department (ED) laparotomy at the trauma bay. We investigated the mortality and time taken from admission to ED laparotomy.
Methods
We reviewed the data recorded in our center’s trauma database between January 2020 and December 2022 and identified patients who underwent laparotomy because of abdominal trauma. Laparotomies that were performed at the trauma bay or the ED were classified as ED laparotomy, whereas those performed in the operating room (OR) were referred to as OR laparotomy. In cases that required expeditious hemostasis, ED laparotomy was performed appropriately.
Results
From January 2020 to December 2022, 105 trauma patients admitted to our hospital underwent emergency laparotomy. Of these patients, six (5.7%) underwent ED laparotomy. ED laparotomy was associated with a mortality rate of 66.7% (four of six patients), which was significantly higher than that of OR laparotomy (17.1%, 18 of 99 patients, P=0.006). All the patients who received ED laparotomy also underwent damage control laparotomy. The time between admission to the first laparotomy was significantly shorter in the ED laparotomy group (28.5 minutes; interquartile range [IQR], 14–59 minutes) when compared with the OR laparotomy group (104 minutes; IQR, 88–151 minutes; P <0.001). The two patients who survived after ED laparotomy had massive mesenteric bleeding, which was successfully ligated. The other four patients, who had liver laceration, kidney rupture, spleen injury, and pancreas avulsion, succumbed to the injuries.
Conclusions
Although ED laparotomy was associated with a higher mortality rate, the time between admission and ED laparotomy was markedly shorter than for OR laparotomy. Notably, major mesenteric hemorrhages were effectively controlled through ED laparotomy.
Summary
Case Report
Gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma: a case report
Gil Hwan Kim, Sung Jin Park, Chan Ik Park
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(4):287-290.   Published online December 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0054
  • 1,370 View
  • 34 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Gastric artery bleeding after blunt trauma is rare. In such cases, if vital signs are stable, angiographic embolization may be performed. Although gastric artery embolization is known to be safe due to its anatomical properties, complications may occur. We report a case of gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma. The 55-year-old male patient was found with gastric arterial bleeding after a traffic accident. His vital signs were stable, and gastric artery embolization was performed. Gastric necrosis was subsequently found, which was treated surgically.
Summary
Original Articles
Incidence and Clinical Features of Urethral Injuries with Pelvic Fractures in Males: A 6-Year Retrospective Cohort Study at a Single Institution in South Korea
Hyun Woo Sun, Hohyun Kim, Chang Ho Jeon, Jae Hoon Jang, Gil Hwan Kim, Chan Ik Park, Sung Jin Park, Jae Hun Kim, Seok Ran Yeom
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):98-104.   Published online April 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0034
  • 3,367 View
  • 141 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Severe pelvic fractures are associated with genitourinary injuries, but the relationship between pelvic trauma and concomitant urethral injuries has yet to be elucidated. This study evaluated the incidence, mechanism, site, and extent of urethral injuries in male patients with pelvic fractures.

Methods

A retrospective cohort study was performed involving patients with urethral injuries accompanying pelvic fractures who visited Pusan National University Hospital from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2019. Demographics, mechanisms of injury, clinical features of the urethral injuries, concomitant bladder injuries, methods of management, and the configuration of the pelvic fractures were analyzed.

Results

The final study population included 24 patients. The overall incidence of urethral injury with pelvic fracture was 2.6%, with the most common mechanism of urethral injury being traffic accidents (62.5%). Complete urethral disruption (16/24, 66.7%) was more common than partial urethral injuries (8/24, 33.3%), and unstable pelvic fractures were the most common type of pelvic fracture observed (70.8%). There was no definitive relationship between the extent of urethral injury and pelvic ring stability.

Conclusions

The present study provides a 6-year retrospective review characterizing the incidence, mechanism, and clinical features of urethral injury-associated pelvic fractures. This study suggests that the possibility of urethral injury must be considered, especially in unstable pelvic fracture patients, and that treatment should be chosen based on the clinical findings.

Summary
Effects of Massive Transfusion Protocol Implementation in Trauma Patients at a Level I Trauma Center
Hyun Woo Sun, Sang Bong Lee, Sung Jin Park, Chan Ik Park, Jae Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):74-80.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.022
  • 5,882 View
  • 169 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

This study was conducted to investigate whether rapid and efficient administration of blood products was achieved and whether clinical outcomes were improved by applying a massive transfusion protocol (MTP).

Methods

From January 2016 to September 2019, the medical records of trauma patients who received at least 10 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) at Pusan National University Hospital (level I trauma center) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients treated from January 2016 to January 2018 were designated as the non-MTP group, and those treated from February 2018 to September 2019 were designated as the MTP group.

Results

During the study period, 370 patients received massive transfusions. The non-MTP and MTP groups comprised 84 and 55 patients, respectively. No significant between-group differences were found in the units of PRBC (23.2 vs. 25.3, respectively; p=0.46), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (21.1 vs. 24.4, respectively; p=0.40), and platelets (PLT) (15.4 vs. 17.0, respectively; p=0.54) administered in the first 24 hours. No statistically significant differences between the non-MTP and MTP groups were found in the FFP-to-PRBC ratio (0.9 vs. 0.94, respectively; p=0.44) and or the PLT-to-PRBC ratio (0.72 vs. 0.72, respectively; p=0.21). However, the total number of cryoprecipitate units was significantly higher in the MTP group than in the non-MTP group (7.4 vs. 15.3 units, respectively; p=0.003) and the ratio of cryoprecipitate to PRBC in the MTP group was significantly higher than in the non-MTP group (0.31 vs. 0.62, respectively; p=0.021). The time to transfusion was significantly reduced after MTP implementation (41.0 vs. 14.9 minutes, respectively; p=0.003).

Conclusions

Although no significant differences were found in the clinical outcomes of patients who had undergone severe trauma, rapid and balanced transfusion was achieved after implementing the MTP.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Acquired Factor XIII Deficiency in Patients with Multiple Trauma
    Michael Hetz, Tareq Juratli, Oliver Tiebel, Moritz Tobias Giesecke, Serafeim Tsitsilonis, Hanns-Christoph Held, Franziska Beyer, Christian Kleber
    Injury.2023; 54(5): 1257.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Blunt Transection of the Entire Anterolateral Abdominal Wall Musculature Following Seatbelt-Related Injury
Hohyun Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Gil Hwan Kim, Hyun-Woo Sun, Chan Ik Park, Sung Jin Park, Chan Kyu Lee, Suk Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):128-133.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0006
  • 6,840 View
  • 103 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWHs) are uncommon and the incidence of this, which is rarely encountered in clinical practice, has been estimated at 1%. Furthermore, blunt transection of the entire abdominal wall musculature caused by seatbelt is a very rare complication. We report a case of adult with a complete disruption of the entire anterolateral abdominal wall muscle following the seatbelt injury. A 32-year-old male was wearing a seat belt in a high speed motor vehicle collision. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the complete disruption of bilateral abdominal wall musculatures including TAWH without visceral injury. However, injuries of small bowel and sigmoid colon were observed in the intra-operative field. The patient underwent the repair by primary closure of the defect with absorbable monofilament sutures. This case suggests that especially in TAWH patients, even if a CT scan is normal, clinicians should keep the possibility of bowel injury in mind, and choose a treatment based on the clinical findings.

Summary
Successful Endoscopic Treatment of Hepatic Duct Confluence Injury after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Case Report
Chan Ik Park, Sung Jin Park, Sang Bong Lee, Kwang Hee Yeo, Seon Uoo Choi, Seon Hee Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Dong Hoon Baek
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(3):93-97.   Published online September 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.3.93
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Hepatic duct confluence injury, which is developed by blunt abdominal trauma, is rare. Conventionally, bile duct injury was treated by surgical intervention. In recent decades, however, there had been an increase in radiologic or endoscopic intervention to treat bile duct injury. In a hemodynamically stable patient, endoscopic intervention is considered as the first-line treatment for bile duct injury. A 40 year-old man was transferred to the emergency department of OO trauma center after multiple blunt injuries. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography performed in another hospital showed a liver laceration with active arterial bleeding, fracture of the sacrum and left inferior pubic ramus, and intraperitoneal bladder rupture. The patient presented with hemorrhagic shock because of intra-peritoneal hemorrhage. After resuscitation, angiographic intervention was performed. After angiographic embolization of the liver laceration, emergency laparotomy was performed to repair the bladder injury. However, there was no evidence of bile duct injury on initial laparotomy. On post-trauma day (PTD) 4, the color of intra-abdominal drainage of the patient changed to a greenish hue; bile leakage was revealed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Bile leakage was detected near the hepatic duct confluence; therefore, a biliary stent was placed into the left hepatic duct. On PTD 37, contrast leakage was still detected but both hepatic ducts were delineated on the second ERCP. Stents were placed into the right and left hepatic ducts. On PTD 71, a third ERCP revealed no contrast leakage; therefore, all stents were removed after 2 weeks (PTD 85). ERCP and biliary stenting could be effective treatment options for hemodynamically stable patients after blunt trauma.
Summary
Successful TAE after DCS for Active Arterial Bleeding from Blunt Hepatic Injury in a Child: A Case Report
Chan Ik Park, Sang Bong Lee, Kwang Hee Yeo, Seungchan Lee, Sung Jin Park, Ho Hyun Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Chang Won Kim, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):47-50.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.47
  • 1,967 View
  • 11 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for blunt hepatic injury in children is not common and is especially rare after damage control surgery (DCS). We report a successful TAE after DCS on a child for massive bleeding from the left hepatic artery due to a motor vehicle accident. The car (a sport utility vehicle) ran over the chest and abdomen of a 4-year-old boy. On arrival, initial vital signs were as follows: blood pressure, 70/40 mmHg; heart rate, 149/min; temperature, 36.7℃; respiratory rate, 38/min. After resuscitation, computed tomography was done, and a suspicious contrast leakage from a branch of the left hepatic artery and a spleen injury (grade V) were found. TAE was performed successfully after DCS for a liver injury.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Damage Control Surgery for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Caused by Delayed Rupture of Hepatic Subcapsular Hematoma
    Chan Yong Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Ho Hyun Kim, Seon Hee Kim, Hyun Min Cho, Hoon Kwon, Chang Ho Jeon, Chang Won Kim, Seok Ran Yeom
    Trauma Image and Procedure.2017; 2(1): 17.     CrossRef
Penetrating Neck Trauma: A Case of Spinal Cord Injury by Embedded Scissor
Seon Hee Kim, Sun Woo Choi, Sung Jin Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Chang Wan Kim, Sang Bong Lee, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(2):71-74.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.2.71
  • 2,782 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrating neck trauma involving spinal cord injury is relatively uncommon, but can be life-threatening. We report a case of 59-year-old female who presented with hypotension after stab injury self-inflicted with a scissor to her neck. Although Open removal of the scissor and control of bleeding were successfully done, penetration of spinal cord resulted in a neurologic impairment.
Summary
Successful Angiographic Embolization of Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Rupture Caused by Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report
Sang Bong Lee, Sung Jin Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Chang Wan Kim, Seon Uoo Choi, Seon Hee Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(1):39-42.   Published online March 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.1.39
  • 2,094 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lat. abdominal wall hematoma with active bleeding is very rare but need prompt bleeding control. We report successful treatment by angiographic embolization of superficial circumflex iliac artery rupture caused by blunt trauma. A 60-year-old woman presented painful, enlarging, lat. abdominal wall mass with ecchymosis caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Contrast leakage of superficial circumflex iliac a. within the lt. ext. oblique m. hematoma was confirmed by abdominal computed tomography. Angiographic embolization was performed successfully. Patient was discharged at 4th day after trauma without complication. Angiographic embolization is important treatment option of lat. abdominal wall hematoma with active bleeding replacing emergency surgery.
Summary
Right Diaphragmatic Rupture after Blunt Trauma: Case Report
Ki Hoon Kim, Jin Su Kim, Sung Jin Park, Woon Won Kim, Do Kyun Kang, Ho Gi Min, Yong Han Kim, Cheol Gyu O
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):87-90.
  • 1,170 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt diaphragmatic rupture (BDR) is a relatively rare injury and occurs in 0.8% to 7% of all thorocoabdominal blunt trauma. Especially right diaphragmatic rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is a rarer than left. The diagnosis of BDR can be missed while evaluating the multiple trauma patient. Other severe injuries may mask BDR during the primary resuscitation and survey. We experienced two cases of traumatic rupture of right diaphragm, one diagnosed immediately and the other diagnosed delayed. In this paper we present two cases of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture.
Summary
Original Article
Clinical Outcomes of Splenic Injury
Seung Hyun Baek, Sung Jin Park, Jae Hoon Kim, Hyun Seong Kim, Dae Hwan Kim, Hong Jae Jo, Hyung Il Seo
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(2):44-48.
  • 1,121 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The management of splenic injuries has shifted from a splenectomy to splenic preservation owing to immunity. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinds of management and outcomes through a review of our experience with splenic injuries.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with traumatic splenic injuries using by electronic medical records from Jan. 2007 and Dec. 2011. Splenic injuries were classified according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading system.
RESULTS
There were 11 falls, 11 traffic accidents, 10 motorcylcle accidents, 10 pedestrian accidents and 5 abdominal blunt traumas. Low-grade injured patients (< or =Grade III) were 29 of 43(61.7%), and High-grade injured patients (> or =Grade IV) were 18 of 43(38.3%). In 34 patients, non-surgical treatment was performed, and 14 patients underwent a splenectomy. There were relatively more high-grade in older patients, and the highgrade-injury group showed need for a transfusion (p=0.002), more need for a splenectomy (p<0.001), a longer mean hospital stay (p=0.036), a longer ICU stay (p=0.045) and more combined organ injury (p=0.036).
CONCLUSION
Conservative treatment should be considered in low-grade-injury patients (< or =Grade III). A Splenectomy was performed on 56% of the patients with Grade IV injuries, so a splenectomy should be considered carefully in such patients. In patients with a grade V injury, we think surgical treatment may be needed.
Summary
Case Reports
Serious Bleeding Complication Due to the Use of Low-molecular-weight heparin to treat a Traumatic Patient with Acute Renal Failure
Kyu Hyouck Kyoung, Woon Won Kim, Sung Jin Park, Ki Hoon Kim, Jin Soo Kim, Jong Kwon Park
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):164-167.
  • 1,068 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Trauma is an important risk factor for a pulmonary thromboembolism, and anticoagulation is essential to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with trauma. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is excreted in the kidney; therefore, using LMWH in patients with renal insufficiency may increase the risk of bleeding complication. The following case describes a 55-year-old traffic accident victim who had massive bleeding and underwent a laparotomy for bleeding control. The patient had acute renal failure, and enoxaparin was administered for the prophylaxis of DVT. Although the patient suffered from serious complications such as pericardial hematoma, the patient recovered without sequellae and was discharged at day 84.
Summary
Treatment of Ongoing Bleeding after a Damage Control Laparotomy for a Pelvic Bone Fracture: Arterial Embolization: A Case Report
Ki Hoon Kim, Kyu Hyouk Kyung, Jin Su Kim, Sung Jin Park, So Hyun Nam, Woon Won Kim, Yong Han Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):159-163.
  • 1,107 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Massive bleeding due to traumatic pelvic bone fracture is a leading cause of death. Thus, several methods to control bleeding have been attempted, but none of these has yet been clearly established. After an automobile accident, a 34-year-old motorist was admitted to the Emergency Department for right hip,leg and abdominal pain. Because the patient's pressure remained consistently low and pelvic bone fracture and abdominal bleeding were found on radiologic examination, an explorative laparotomy was performed. After pelvic packing and bleeding control, bleeding still continued, so Angiography was performed, and arterial embolization for bleeding was performed.
Summary
Original Article
Management of Traumatic Diaphragmatic Rupture
Seon Hee Kim, Jeong Su Cho, Yeong Dae Kim, Ho Seok I, Seunghwan Song, Up Huh, Jae Hun Kim, Sung Jin Park
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):217-222.
  • 1,501 View
  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Diaphragmatic rupture following trauma is often an associated and missed injury. This report is about our experience with treating traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR).
METHODS
From January 2007 to September 2012, 18 patients who had a diaphragmatic rupture due to blunt trauma or penetrating injury underwent an operation for diaphragmatic rupture at our hospital. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records, including demographic factors, initial vital signs, associated injuries, interval between trauma and diagnosis, injured side of the diaphragm, diagnostic tools, surgical method or approaches, operative time, herniated organs, complications, and mortality.
RESULTS
The average age of the patients was 43 years, and 16 patients were male. Causes of trauma included motor vehicle crashes (n=7), falls (n=7), and stab wounds (n=5). The TDR was right-sided in 6 patients and left-sided in 12. The diagnosis was made by using a chest X-ray (n=3), and thorax or upper abdominal computed tomography (n=15). Ten(10) patients were diagnosed within 12 hours. A thoracotomy was performed in 8 patients, a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in 4 patients, a laparotomy in 3 patients, and a sternotomy in one patient. Herniated organs were the omentum (n=11), stomach (n=8), spleen and colon (n=6), and liver (n=6). Eighteen diaphragmatic injuries were repaired primarily. Seven patients underwent ventilator care, and two of them had pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. There were no operative mortalities.
CONCLUSION
Early diagnosis and surgical treatment determine the successful management of TDR with or without the herniation of abdominal organs. The surgical approach to TDR is chosen based on accompanying organ injuries and the injured side.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury