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7 "Seong Yup Kim"
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Special Article
Part 3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Airway Management and Emergency Thoracotomy for Trauma Patients from the Korean Society of Traumatology
Chan Yong Park, O Hyun Kim, Sung Wook Chang, Kang Kook Choi, Kyung Hak Lee, Seong Yup Kim, Maru Kim, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(3):195-203.   Published online September 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0050
  • 10,346 View
  • 184 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

The following key questions and recommendations are presented herein: when is airway intubation initiated in severe trauma? Airway intubation must be initiated in severe trauma patients with a GCS of 8 or lower (1B). Should rapid sequence intubation (RSI) be performed in trauma patients? RSI should be performed in trauma patients to secure the airway unless it is determined that securing the airway will be problematic (1B). What should be used as an induction drug for airway intubation? Ketamine or etomidate can be used as a sedative induction drug when RSI is being performed in a trauma patient (2B). If cervical spine damage is suspected, how is cervical protection achieved during airway intubation? When intubating a patient with a cervical spine injury, the extraction collar can be temporarily removed while the neck is fixed and protected manually (1C). What alternative method should be used if securing the airway fails more than three times? If three or more attempts to intubate the airway fail, other methods should be considered to secure the airway (1B). Should trauma patients maintain normal ventilation after intubation? It is recommended that trauma patients who have undergone airway intubation maintain normal ventilation rather than hyperventilation or hypoventilation (1C). When should resuscitative thoracotomy be considered for trauma patients? Resuscitative thoracotomy is recommended for trauma patients with penetrating injuries undergoing cardiac arrest or shock in the emergency room (1B).

Summary
Case Reports
Concise Bedside Surgical Management of Profound Reperfusion Injury after Vascular Reconstruction in Severe Trauma Patient: Case Report
Hoe Jeong Chung, Seong yup Kim, Chun Sung Byun, Ki Youn Kwon, Pil Young Jung
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(4):204-208.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.4.204
  • 2,649 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
For an orthopaedic surgeon, the critical decisions to either amputate or salvage a limb with severe crushing injury with progressive ischemic change due to arterial rupture or occlusion can become a clinical dilemma at the Emergency Department (ED). And reperfusion injury is one of the fetal complications after vascular reconstruction. The authors present a case which was able to save patient's life by rapid vessel ligation at bedside to prevent severe reperfusion injury. A 43-year-old male patient with no pre-existing medical conditions was transported by helicopter to Level I trauma center from incident scene. Initial result of extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) was negative. The trauma series X-rays at the trauma bay of ED showed a multiple contiguous rib fractures with hemothorax and his pelvic radiograph revealed a complex pelvic trauma of an Anterior Posterior Compression (APC) Type II. Lower extremity computed tomography showed a discontinuity in common femoral artery at the fracture site and no distal run off. Surgical finding revealed a complete rupture of common femoral artery and vein around the fracture site. But due to the age aspect of the patient, the operating team decided a vascular repair rather than amputation even if the anticipated reperfusion time was 7 hours from the onset of trauma. Only two hours after the reperfusion, the patient was in a state of shock when his arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) showed a drop of pH from 7.32 to 7.18. An imminent bedside procedure of aseptic opening the surgical site and clamping the anastomosis site was taken place rather than undergoing a surgery of amputation because of ultimately unstable vital sign. The authors would like to emphasize the importance of rapid decision making and prompt vessel ligation which supply blood flow to the ischemic limb to increase the survival rate in case of profound reperfusion injury.
Summary
Simultaneous Surgery on Jejunum perforation with Pelvic Ring Fracture: A Case Report
Hoejeong Chung, Keum Seok Bae, Seong Yup Kim, Doosup Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):56-59.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.56
  • 2,120 View
  • 15 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Patients with pelvic bone fractures with gastrointestinal perforations are reported in 4.4% of the cases and in very rare cases jejunum (0.15) is involved. However, intestinal perforations are often undiagnosed on the first examination before peritonitis is evident. We are presenting a report where a patient with anteroposterior compression injury, who was expected to undergo an internal fixation procedure, did not show any jejunum perforations on abdominal CT or other physical exams but was found on abdominal CT 1 week after right before surgery, therefore excision and anastomosis surgery, pelvic open reduction and internal fixation was simultaneously done with favorable results. In our case, we present a 61 year old male patient with liver trauma, adhesion at the abdominal cavity, with a past history of gallbladder excision, but without abdominal pain, fever, or infection symptoms. Therefore, this was a case that was difficult to initially diagnose the patient with jejunum perforation and peritonitis. The diagnosis was further supported during laparotomy when peritonitis around the area of intestinal perforation was observed. Generally, it is understood that pelvic bone fracture surgery is not immediately done on patients with peritonitis. However, this kind of patient who had peritonitis with intestinal adhesion and other complications could undergo surgery immediately as infection or other related symptoms did not coexist and the patient was rather stable, and as a result the treatment was successful.
Summary
The Occurence of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Abdominal Compartment Patient
Seong Yup Kim, Sung Chan Jin
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):312-315.
  • 1,034 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abdominal compartment syndrome is one cause of deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity. Although prophylactic dose of anticoagulation agent is safely started after 24~48 hours without the evidence of active bleeding, there may be bleeding complication related to invasive procedure which trauma victims undergo. Inferior vena cava filter should be considered in the treatment plan of this complex situation.
Summary
The Management of Arteriovenous Malformation Diagnosed after Extremity Trauma
Seong Yup Kim, Sung Chan Jin
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):308-311.
  • 1,039 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Congenital arteriovenous malformation is rare disease. Endovascular treatment is one of the important modality in the treatment of arteriovenous malformation. We report a successful treatment case of arteriovenous malformation with endovascular treatment.
Summary
A Case of Successful Endoscopic and Conservative Treatment for Intentional Ingestion of Sharp Foreign Bodies in the Alimentary Tract
Jong Min Park, Seong Yup Kim, Il Yong Chung, Woo Shik Kim, Yong Chul Shin, Yeong Cheol Kim, Sei Hyeog Park
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):304-307.
  • 1,131 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Food bolus impaction is the most common cause of esophageal foreign body obstruction in adults. Other causes include intentional ingestion in psychiatric patients or prison inmates. We experienced successful treatment of a patient with intentional ingestion of multiple sharp foreign bodies(25 cutter and razor fragments). A 47-year-old male patient who was suffering from chronic alcoholism was admitted, via the emergency room, with dysphagia and neck pain. He was suffering from alcoholic liver cirrhosis and psychiatric problems, such as chronic alcoholism, anxiety disorder and insomnia. The patient had intended to leave the hospital after having swallowed the sharp objects. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan showed multiple, scattered metal fragments in the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed one impacted blade in the upper esophagus using by a snare with an overtube. The rest of the fragments had already passed through the pylorus, so we could not find them with endoscopy. We checked the patient with simple abdominal radiographs and careful physical examinations every day. All remaining fragments were uneventfully excreted through stool during the patient's 6 day hospital stay. Finally, we were able to confirm the presence of the objects in the stool, and radiographs were negative. The patient was discharged without complications after 14 days hospital stay and then was followed by the Department of Psychiatry.
Summary
Traumatic Organized Hematoma Mimicking Intra-peritoneal Tumor: A Case Report
Jong Min Park, Seong Yup Kim, Il Yong Chung, Woo Shik Kim, Yong Chul Shin, Yeong Cheol Kim, Sei Hyeog Park
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):300-303.
  • 1,159 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt abdominal trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. The lack of historical data and the presence of distracting injuries or altered mental status, from head injury or intoxication, can make these injuries difficult to diagnose and manage. We experienced a case of traumatic organized hematoma misdiagnosed as intra-peritoneal tumor with intestinal obstruction. A 52-year-old homeless male patient who have chronic alcoholism was admitted via emergency room with infra-umbilical abdominal pain. At admission, he was drunken status and so we could not be aware of blows to the abdomen. He had a unknown large operation scar on mid abdomen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed the intestinal obstruction of the ileum level with 5.5cm sized mesenteric tumor. We performed adhesiolysis and widely segmental resection of small bowel including tumor with side-to-side anastomosis due to great discrepancy in size. He stated later that he was a victim of the violence before 3 weeks. A final pathologic report revealed well encapsulated, traumatic mesenteric hematoma with organizing thrombi, ischemia and abscess formation with multiple adhesion bands. Finally, the patient was discharged without complications on postoperative day 14.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury