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15 "O Hyun Kim"
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Original Article
A decade of treating traumatic sternal fractures in a single-center experience in Korea: a retrospective cohort study
Na Hyeon Lee, Seon Hee Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Ho Hyun Kim, Sang Bong Lee, Chan Ik Park, Gil Hwan Kim, Dong Yeon Ryu, Sun Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):362-368.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0027
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Clinical reports on treatment outcomes of sternal fractures are lacking. This study details the clinical features, treatment approaches, and outcomes related to traumatic sternal fractures over a 10-year period at a single institution.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients admitted to a regional trauma center between January 2012 and December 2021. Among 7,918 patients with chest injuries, 266 were diagnosed with traumatic sternal fractures. Patient data were collected, including demographics, injury mechanisms, severity, associated injuries, sternal fracture characteristics, hospital stay duration, mortality, respiratory complications, and surgical details. Surgical indications encompassed emergency cases involving intrathoracic injuries, unstable fractures, severe dislocations, flail chest, malunion, and persistent high-grade pain.
Results
Of 266 patients with traumatic sternal fractures, 260 were included; 98 underwent surgical treatment for sternal fractures, while 162 were managed conservatively. Surgical indications ranged from intrathoracic organ or blood vessel injuries necessitating thoracotomy to unstable fractures with severe dislocations. Factors influencing surgical treatment included flail motion and rib fracture. The median length of intensive care unit stay was 5.4 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1.5–18.0 days) for the nonsurgery group and 8.6 days (IQR, 3.3–23.6 days) for the surgery group. The median length of hospital stay was 20.9 days (IQR, 9.3–48.3 days) for the nonsurgery group and 27.5 days (IQR, 17.0 to 58.0 days) for the surgery group. The between-group differences were not statistically significant. Surgical interventions were successful, with stable bone union and minimal complications. Flail motion in the presence of rib fracture was a crucial consideration for surgical intervention.
Conclusions
Surgical treatment recommendations for sternal fractures vary based on flail chest presence, displacement degree, and rib fracture. Surgery is recommended for patients with offset-type sternal fractures with rib and segmental sternal fractures. Surgical intervention led to stable bone union and minimal complications.
Summary
Special Articles
Part 4. Clinical Practice Guideline for Surveillance and Imaging Studies of Trauma Patients in the Trauma Bay from the Korean Society of Traumatology
Sung Wook Chang, Kang Kook Choi, O Hyun Kim, Maru Kim, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(4):207-218.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0084
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AbstractAbstract PDF

The following recommendations are presented herein: All trauma patients admitted to the resuscitation room should be constantly (or periodically) monitored for parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, body temperature, electrocardiography, Glasgow Coma Scale, and pupil reflex (1C). Chest AP and pelvic AP should be performed as the standard initial trauma series for severe trauma patients (1B). In patients with severe hemodynamically unstable trauma, it is recommended to perform extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) as an initial examination (1B). In hemodynamically stable trauma patients, eFAST can be considered as the initial examination (2B). For the diagnosis of suspected head trauma patients, brain computed tomography (CT) should be performed as an initial examination (1B). Cervical spine CT should be performed as an initial imaging test for patients with suspected cervical spine injury (1C). It is not necessary to perform chest CT as an initial examination in all patients with suspected chest injury, but in cases of suspected vascular injury in patients with thoracic or high-energy damage due to the mechanism of injury, chest CT can be considered for patients in a hemodynamically stable condition (2B). CT of the abdomen is recommended for patients suspected of abdominal trauma with stable vital signs (1B). CT of the abdomen should be considered for suspected pelvic trauma patients with stable vital signs (2B). Whole-body CT can be considered in patients with suspicion of severe trauma with stable vital signs (2B). Magnetic resonance imaging can be considered in hemodynamically stable trauma patients with suspected spinal cord injuries (2B).

Summary
Part 3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Airway Management and Emergency Thoracotomy for Trauma Patients from the Korean Society of Traumatology
Chan Yong Park, O Hyun Kim, Sung Wook Chang, Kang Kook Choi, Kyung Hak Lee, Seong Yup Kim, Maru Kim, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(3):195-203.   Published online September 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0050
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AbstractAbstract PDF

The following key questions and recommendations are presented herein: when is airway intubation initiated in severe trauma? Airway intubation must be initiated in severe trauma patients with a GCS of 8 or lower (1B). Should rapid sequence intubation (RSI) be performed in trauma patients? RSI should be performed in trauma patients to secure the airway unless it is determined that securing the airway will be problematic (1B). What should be used as an induction drug for airway intubation? Ketamine or etomidate can be used as a sedative induction drug when RSI is being performed in a trauma patient (2B). If cervical spine damage is suspected, how is cervical protection achieved during airway intubation? When intubating a patient with a cervical spine injury, the extraction collar can be temporarily removed while the neck is fixed and protected manually (1C). What alternative method should be used if securing the airway fails more than three times? If three or more attempts to intubate the airway fail, other methods should be considered to secure the airway (1B). Should trauma patients maintain normal ventilation after intubation? It is recommended that trauma patients who have undergone airway intubation maintain normal ventilation rather than hyperventilation or hypoventilation (1C). When should resuscitative thoracotomy be considered for trauma patients? Resuscitative thoracotomy is recommended for trauma patients with penetrating injuries undergoing cardiac arrest or shock in the emergency room (1B).

Summary
Original Article
Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Traumatic Shock Patients from the Korean Society of Traumatology
Pil Young Jung, Byungchul Yu, Chan-Yong Park, Sung Wook Chang, O Hyun Kim, Maru Kim, Junsik Kwon, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):1-12.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.015
  • 18,506 View
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  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Despite recent developments in the management of trauma patients in South Korea, a standardized system and guideline for trauma treatment are absent.

Methods

Five guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument.

Results

Restrictive volume replacement must be used for patients experiencing shock from trauma until hemostasis is achieved (1B). The target systolic pressure for fluid resuscitation should be 80–90 mmHg in hypovolemic shock patients (1C). For patients with head trauma, the target pressure for fluid resuscitation should be 100–110 mmHg (2C). Isotonic crystalloid fluid is recommended for initially treating traumatic hypovolemic shock patients (1A). Hypothermia should be prevented in patients with severe trauma, and if hypothermia occurs, the body temperature should be increased without delay (1B). Acidemia must be corrected with an appropriate means of treatment for hypovolemic trauma patients (1B). When a large amount of transfusion is required for trauma patients in hypovolemic shock, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) should be used (1B). The decision to implement MTP should be made based on hemodynamic status and initial responses to fluid resuscitation, not only the patient’s initial condition (1B). The ratio of plasma to red blood cell concentration should be at least 1:2 for trauma patients requiring massive transfusion (1B). When a trauma patient is in life-threatening hypovolemic shock, vasopressors can be administered in addition to fluids and blood products (1B). Early administration of tranexamic acid is recommended in trauma patients who are actively bleeding or at high risk of hemorrhage (1B). For hypovolemic patients with coagulopathy non-responsive to primary therapy, the use of fibrinogen concentrate, cryoprecipitate, or recombinant factor VIIa can be considered (2C).

Conclusions

This research presents Korea's first clinical practice guideline for patients with traumatic shock. This guideline will be revised with updated research every 5 years.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An Artificial Intelligence Model for Predicting Trauma Mortality Among Emergency Department Patients in South Korea: Retrospective Cohort Study
    Seungseok Lee, Wu Seong Kang, Do Wan Kim, Sang Hyun Seo, Joongsuck Kim, Soon Tak Jeong, Dong Keon Yon, Jinseok Lee
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2023; 25: e49283.     CrossRef
  • Nonselective versus Selective Angioembolization for Trauma Patients with Pelvic Injuries Accompanied by Hemorrhage: A Meta-Analysis
    Hyunseok Jang, Soon Tak Jeong, Yun Chul Park, Wu Seong Kang
    Medicina.2023; 59(8): 1492.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Iatrogenic Delayed Aortic Injury Following a Surgical Stabilization of Flail Chest
Junepill Seok, Hyun Min Cho, Seon Hee Kim, Ho Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(3):174-176.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.037
  • 2,805 View
  • 41 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Most of aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma usually occur at the aortic isthmus and are identified in the emergency department soon after arrival. Delayed aortic injures by fractured posterior ribs, however, are relatively rare and have been reported only a few times. We recently experienced an iatrogenic descending aortic injury sustained as a result of a direct puncture by a sharp rib end after surgical stabilization of rib fractures.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Surgical Stabilisation of Traumatic Rib Fractures with Chronic, Residual Type A Aortic Dissection
    Kieran J. Matic, Rajkumar Cheluvappa, Selwyn Selvendran
    Healthcare.2021; 9(4): 392.     CrossRef
Rectus Sheath Hematoma Caused by Noncontact Strenuous Exercise
Gil Hwan Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Ho Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2017;30(4):227-230.   Published online December 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2017.30.4.227
  • 3,217 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is an uncommon but well-documented clinical condition. It is usually caused by direct trauma or anticoagulation, although there are many other causes. However, RSH after noncontact strenuous exercise is very rare. We present a rare case of RSH after playing volleyball without direct trauma that was successfully treated by angiographic embolization.

Summary
Successful TAE after DCS for Active Arterial Bleeding from Blunt Hepatic Injury in a Child: A Case Report
Chan Ik Park, Sang Bong Lee, Kwang Hee Yeo, Seungchan Lee, Sung Jin Park, Ho Hyun Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Chang Won Kim, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):47-50.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.47
  • 1,961 View
  • 11 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for blunt hepatic injury in children is not common and is especially rare after damage control surgery (DCS). We report a successful TAE after DCS on a child for massive bleeding from the left hepatic artery due to a motor vehicle accident. The car (a sport utility vehicle) ran over the chest and abdomen of a 4-year-old boy. On arrival, initial vital signs were as follows: blood pressure, 70/40 mmHg; heart rate, 149/min; temperature, 36.7℃; respiratory rate, 38/min. After resuscitation, computed tomography was done, and a suspicious contrast leakage from a branch of the left hepatic artery and a spleen injury (grade V) were found. TAE was performed successfully after DCS for a liver injury.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Damage Control Surgery for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Caused by Delayed Rupture of Hepatic Subcapsular Hematoma
    Chan Yong Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Ho Hyun Kim, Seon Hee Kim, Hyun Min Cho, Hoon Kwon, Chang Ho Jeon, Chang Won Kim, Seok Ran Yeom
    Trauma Image and Procedure.2017; 2(1): 17.     CrossRef
Original Article
PARK Index for Preventable Major Trauma Death Rate
Chan Yong Park, Byungchul Yu, Ho Hyun Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Jungnam Lee, Hyun Min Cho, Han Na Park
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):115-122.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.115
  • 2,543 View
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
To calculate Preventable Trauma Death Rate (PTDR), Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) is the most utilized evaluation index of the trauma centers in South Korea. However, this method may have greater variation due to the small number of the denominator in each trauma center. Therefore, we would like to develop new indicators that can be used easily on quality improvement activities by increasing the denominator.
METHODS
The medical records of 1005 major trauma (ISS >15) patients who visited 2 regional trauma center (A center and B center) in 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. PTDR and PARK Index (Preventable Major Trauma Death Rate, PMTDR) were calculated in 731 patients with inclusion criteria. We invented PARK Index to minimize the variation of preventability of trauma death. In PTDR the denominator is all number of deaths, and in PARK Index the denominator is number of all patients who have survival probability (Ps) larger than 0.25. Numerator is the number of deaths from patients who have Ps larger than 0.25.
RESULTS
The size of denominator was 40 in A center, 49 in B center, and overall 89 in PTDR. The size of denominator was significantly increased, and 287 (7.2-fold) in A center, 422 (8.6-fold) in B center, and overall 709 (8.0-fold) in PARK Index. PARK Index was 12.9% in A center, 8.3% in B center, and overall 10.2%.
CONCLUSION
PARK Index is calculated as a rate of mortality from all major trauma patients who have Ps larger than 0.25. PARK Index obtain an effect that denominator is increased 8.0-fold than PTDR. Therefore PARK Index is able to compensate for greater disadvantage of PTDR. PARK Index is expected to be helpful in implementing evaluation of mortality outcome and to be a new index that can be applied to a trauma center quality improvement activity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Outcomes at Trauma Centers versus Non-Trauma Centers for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
    Tae Seok Jeong, Dae Han Choi, Woo Kyung Kim
    Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society.2023; 66(1): 63.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Preventable Trauma Death Rates in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury Before and After the Establishment of Regional Trauma Center: A Single Center Experience
    Dae Han Choi, Tae Seok Jeong, Myung Jin Jang
    Korean Journal of Neurotrauma.2023; 19(2): 227.     CrossRef
  • PARK Index and S-score Can Be Good Quality Indicators for the Preventable Mortality in a Single Trauma Center
    Chan Yong Park, Kyung Hag Lee, Na Yun Lee, Su Ji Kim, Hyun Min Cho, Chan Kyu Lee
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2017; 30(4): 126.     CrossRef
Case Report
Penetrating Neck Trauma: A Case of Spinal Cord Injury by Embedded Scissor
Seon Hee Kim, Sun Woo Choi, Sung Jin Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Chang Wan Kim, Sang Bong Lee, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(2):71-74.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.2.71
  • 2,769 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrating neck trauma involving spinal cord injury is relatively uncommon, but can be life-threatening. We report a case of 59-year-old female who presented with hypotension after stab injury self-inflicted with a scissor to her neck. Although Open removal of the scissor and control of bleeding were successfully done, penetration of spinal cord resulted in a neurologic impairment.
Summary
Original Article
Abdomino-perineal Organ Injuries Caused by Cultivators
Kwang Hee Yeo, Chan Yong Park, Ho Hyun Kim, Soon Chang Park, Seok Ran Yeom
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(2):60-66.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.2.60
  • 2,150 View
  • 4 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Cultivator accidents are frequent and often lead to abdomino-perineal organ injury and, if severe, to death. This study presents the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and factors associated with mortality in patients who sustained an abdomino-perineal organ injury in cultivator accidents.
METHODS
We retrospectively analyzed the records of 53 patients who visited the emergency department of a tertiary hospital with abdomino-perineal organ injuries caused in cultivator accidents from April 2005 to March 2010.
RESULTS
All 53 patients had visited other medical institutions before visiting our hospital. Their mean age was 64.0+/-11.1 (range, 20-80) years and 32 (60.4%) patients were 65 or older. The male-to-female ratio was 46:7. The chief complaint was abdominal pain (38 cases, 71.7%). The 53 patients included 41 cultivator operators (77.4%), 11 passengers (20.8%), and 1 passerby (1.9%). The causes of the injuries included a direct impact of the handlebar in 20 cases (37.7%), a rollover in 21 cases (39.6%), a fall in 10 cases (18.9%), and a wheel in two cases (3.8%). Several of the 53 patients had injuries to multiple abdomino-perineal organs, and the injured organs included the liver (23 cases, 26.4%), spleen (16 cases, 18.4%), pancreas (7 cases, 8.0%), small bowel (7 cases, 8.0%), mesentery (6 cases, 6.9%), adrenal gland (5 cases, 5.8%), and other organs. According to the abbreviated injury scale (AIS) dictionary, a thoracic injury was the most frequent co-injury (33 of 53 cases, 62.3%). Abdomino-perineal surgery was performed in 31 cases (58.8%) and angio-embolization was performed for six liver and two kidney injuries. Thirteen patients died (24.5%); all were males. The Injury Severity Scale (ISS) was lower in the survivors (17.8+/-8.5 vs. 27.0+/-16.0; p=0.010).
CONCLUSION
With the aging of agricultural workers, safety education programs should be implemented. Furthermore, the patient transfer system in agricultural areas must be improved.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Cultivator-related Trauma Cases in a Regional Trauma Center in the Rural Area of Gyeongbuk Province
    Ui Kang Hwang, Seok Hwa Youn, Chan Yong Park
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2017; 30(3): 80.     CrossRef
Case Report
Successful Angiographic Embolization of Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Rupture Caused by Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report
Sang Bong Lee, Sung Jin Park, Kwang Hee Yeo, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Chang Wan Kim, Seon Uoo Choi, Seon Hee Kim, Jung Joo Hwang, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(1):39-42.   Published online March 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.1.39
  • 2,086 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lat. abdominal wall hematoma with active bleeding is very rare but need prompt bleeding control. We report successful treatment by angiographic embolization of superficial circumflex iliac artery rupture caused by blunt trauma. A 60-year-old woman presented painful, enlarging, lat. abdominal wall mass with ecchymosis caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Contrast leakage of superficial circumflex iliac a. within the lt. ext. oblique m. hematoma was confirmed by abdominal computed tomography. Angiographic embolization was performed successfully. Patient was discharged at 4th day after trauma without complication. Angiographic embolization is important treatment option of lat. abdominal wall hematoma with active bleeding replacing emergency surgery.
Summary
Original Articles
Clinical Characteristics and Prognostic Factors of Geriatric Patients Involved in Traffic Accidents
Tae Su Kim, Kang Hyun Lee, Tae Hoon Kim, O Hyun Kim, Yong Sung Cha, Kyung Chul Cha, Sung Oh Hwang
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):101-107.
  • 1,319 View
  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Recently, the population of elderly people has been increasing rapidly all over the world. The social activities of the aging population have increased, which has also increased the number of elderly patients injured in traffic accidents. Thus, we analyzed the characteristics of elderly patients involved in traffic accidents.
METHODS
This study was conducted retrospectively from July 2008 to March 2009 among trauma patients involved in traffic accidents who visited Wonju Severance Christian Hospital. Patients under 18 years of age and pregnant patients were excluded. We divided the patients in two groups, a geriatrics group and an adult group on the basis of an age of 65. We compared the types of traffic accidents, the locations of the accidents, the behaviors of the patients at the times of the accidents, the use of seat-belts, and alcohol consumption between the two groups. We calculated the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) for each group.
RESULTS
Total number of the included patients was 903, and the number of elderly patients was 181 (mean age: 71.7+/-4.9 years old). There were no significant differences in the initial vital signs, GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale), and RTS between the two groups. There were differences in the types and the locations of the crashes, the behaviors of the patients at the times of the accidents, the use of seat belts, and alcohol consumption between the two groups (p<0.05). The average ISS of the geriatric group was higher than that of the adult group (9.66+/-10.11 vs. 6.59+/-8.99, p=0.004). The mortality was higher in the geriatric group (n=17,9%) than in the adult group (n=23,2%) (p=0.004).
CONCLUSION
The numbers of mortalities and surgical procedures were greater within the elderly group than the adult group. The average ISS was higher in the geriatric group than in the adult group. The severity of injuries due to traffic accidents was higher in the geriatric group than it was in the adult group.
Summary
Surgical Management of Duodenal Traumatic Injuries: A Single Center Study
Oh Hyun Park, Yun Chul Park, Dong Gyu Lee, Ho Hyun Kim, Chan Yong Park, Jung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):157-162.
  • 1,288 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Abdominal trauma rarely causes injuries involving duodenum. But, it is associated with higher rate of the complication and mortality than other abdominal injuries. There are many options for the management of duodenal injuries. Herein we are to review our experiences and find out the risk factors related to the morbidity and the mortality in traumatic duodenal injuries.
METHODS
The medical records of total 25 patients who managed by surgical managements and survive more than 48 hours were conducted from January 2006 to December 2012. The clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes are reviewed.
RESULTS
Among 25 patients, most of them (n=17, 68.0%) were managed by the pyloric exclusion and the gastrojejunostomy. The 3rd portion is the most injured site (n=15, 60.0%), and the majority exhibited grade 2 severity (n=14, 56.0%). Most of patients had blunt abdominal traumas (n=23, 92.0%) so that many of them (n=14, 56.0%) had other combined abdominal injuries. The mean ISS is 11.5+/-6.2. The surgery related mortality rate was 28.0%. There was no statistical significance between each factors and the mortality except leakage (p=0.012). But, we could find some trends about traumatic duodenal injuries in this study. The mortality rates of them who older than 55 years were higher than others. And, all 3 patients who delayed the operation more than 24 hours after the trauma had some complications or died. Also, the patients who had the 2nd portion injury, grade 3 injury, or combined abdominal injury were less survived.
CONCLUSION
Duodenal injury is related to high rate of morbidity(47.8%) and mortality(28.0%). Age, portion of injury, OIS grade, ISS>15, combined intra-abdominal operation, and trauma to operation time over 24 hrs have some trend with attribution to mortality. Especially leakage of duodenal injury is related to mortality.
Summary
Case Reports
Cerebral Fat Embolism after Traumatic Multiple Fracture: A Case Report
Ho Hyun Kim, Yun Chul Park, Dong Kyu Lee, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Yeong Dae Kim, Jung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):58-62.
  • 1,206 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A cerebral fat embolism is an uncommon but serious complication of long bone fracture. It can be fatal, and early detection is not easy. Neurologic symptoms are variable, and the clinical diagnosis is difficult. The pathogenesis remains controversial, and several theories have been proposed. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect a cerebral fat embolism with a higher sensitivity than cerebral computed tomography. We report a case of a post-traumatic cerebral fat embolism without pulmonary involvement and review the existing literature.
Summary
Traumatic Perforation of the Duodenal Diverticulum: A Case Report
Ho Hyun Kim, Yun Chul Park, Dong Kyu Lee, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Yeong Dae Kim, Jung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):53-57.
  • 1,389 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A duodenal diverticulum is a frequent abnormality that is usually diagnosed incidentally. Clinical manifestations usually mimic those of highly-varied entities. Among the complications of a duodenal diverticulum, perforation is fairly rare; rupture due to blunt trauma is even rarer, and no cases have been reported in Korean literature. We report the case of a 61-year-old male patient who presented with a perforated duodenal diverticulum after a blunt trauma. We also review the existing literature.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury