Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
5 "Junepill Seok"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Case Report
Surgical management of supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma in Korea: three case reports
Su Young Yoon, Junepill Seok, Yook Kim, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Young Lee, Mou Seop Lee, Hong Rye Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):399-403.   Published online December 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0073
  • 195 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a rare but life-threatening complication following traumatic brain injury. However, the literature on SIEDH is sparse, consisting only of a few small series. Prompt diagnosis and the application of appropriate surgical techniques are crucial for the rapid and safe management of SIEDH. Herein, we present three cases of SIEDH treated at our institution, employing a range of surgical approaches.
Summary
Original Article
Clinical characteristics and mortality risk factors among trauma patients by age groups at a single center in Korea over 7 years: a retrospective study
Jonghee Han, Su Young Yoon, Junepill Seok, Jin Young Lee, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Bong Ye, Younghoon Sul, Seheon Kim, Hong Rye Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):329-336.   Published online November 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0035
  • 465 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
In this study, we aimed to compare the characteristics of patients with trauma by age group in a single center in Korea to identify the clinical characteristics and analyze the risk factors affecting mortality.
Methods
Patients aged ≥18 years who visited the Chungbuk National University Hospital Regional Trauma Center between January 2016 and December 2022 were included. The accident mechanism, severity of the injury, and outcomes were compared by classifying the patients into group A (18–64 years), group B (65–79 years), and group C (≥80 years). In addition, logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting death.
Results
The most common injury mechanism was traffic accidents in group A (40.9%) and slipping in group B (37.0%) and group C (56.2%). Although group A had the highest intensive care unit admission rate (38.0%), group C had the highest mortality rate (9.5%). In the regression analysis, 3 to 8 points on the Glasgow Coma Scale had the highest odds ratio for mortality, and red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours, intensive care unit admission, age, and Injury Severity Score were the predictors of death.
Conclusions
For patients with trauma, the mechanism, injured body region, and severity of injury differed among the age groups. The high mortality rate of elderly patients suggests the need for different treatment approaches for trauma patients according to age. Identifying factors affecting clinical patterns and mortality according to age groups can help improve the prognosis of trauma patients in the future.
Summary
Case Reports
Chest Wall Reconstruction for the Treatment of Lung Herniation and Respiratory Failure 1 Month after Emergency Thoracotomy in a Patient with Traumatic Flail Chest
Junepill Seok, Il Jae Wang
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):284-287.   Published online August 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0059
  • 7,929 View
  • 88 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

We report a case of delayed chest wall reconstruction after thoracotomy. A 53-year-old female, a victim of a motor vehicle accident, presented with bilateral multiple rib fractures with flail motion and multiple extrathoracic injuries. Whole-body computed tomography revealed multiple fractures of the bilateral ribs, clavicle, and scapula, and bilateral hemopneumothorax with severe lung contusions. Active hemorrhage was also found in the anterior pelvis, which was treated by angioembolization. The patient was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit for follow-up. We planned to perform surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) because her lung condition did not seem favorable for general anesthesia. Within a few hours, however, massive hemorrhage (presumably due to coagulopathy) drained through the thoracic drainage catheter. We performed an exploratory thoracotomy in the operating room. We initially planned to perform exploratory thoracotomy and “on the way out” SSRF. In the operating room, the hemorrhage was controlled; however, her condition deteriorated and SSRF could not be completed. SSRF was completed after about a month owing to other medical conditions, and the patient was weaned successfully.

Summary
Iatrogenic Delayed Aortic Injury Following a Surgical Stabilization of Flail Chest
Junepill Seok, Hyun Min Cho, Seon Hee Kim, Ho Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(3):174-176.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.037
  • 2,688 View
  • 40 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Most of aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma usually occur at the aortic isthmus and are identified in the emergency department soon after arrival. Delayed aortic injures by fractured posterior ribs, however, are relatively rare and have been reported only a few times. We recently experienced an iatrogenic descending aortic injury sustained as a result of a direct puncture by a sharp rib end after surgical stabilization of rib fractures.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Surgical Stabilisation of Traumatic Rib Fractures with Chronic, Residual Type A Aortic Dissection
    Kieran J. Matic, Rajkumar Cheluvappa, Selwyn Selvendran
    Healthcare.2021; 9(4): 392.     CrossRef
Original Article
Clinical Analysis of the Patients with Isolated Low-Velocity Penetrating Neck Injury
Junepill Seok, Hyun Min Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(1):1-5.   Published online April 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.1.1
  • 3,438 View
  • 70 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Although there has been substantial progress for the treatment of thoracic trauma, the mortality of the penetrating neck injury is still high, has been reported about 10?15%. However, there has not been a report which is reflecting Korean medical present. We retrospectively analyzed the penetrating neck injury patients based on the Korean Trauma Data Base.

Methods

Between December 2013 and June 2017 at the trauma center of the Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea, total of 36 patients with isolated low-velocity penetrating neck injuries were included. We analyzed the patients’ age, gender, injury mechanism and causes by medical chart review.

Results

Among total of 36 patients, 26 (72.2%) were male and 10 (27.8%) were female. Homicidal neck injuries were most common, followed by accidental and suicidal injuries (47% vs. 33% vs. 19%, respectively). All penetrating injuries in our study were low-velocity trauma such as following: knife (n=16, 44.4%); glass or glass bottle (n=11, 30.6%); scissors (n=4, 11.1%); grinder (n=2, 5.6%); and three (8.3%) of miscellaneous injuries. Twenty-seven (75.0%) patients underwent emergency surgery, and only one (2.8%) patient underwent elective surgery. Eleven (30.6) patients were diagnosed with superficial injuries, including six patients who had conservative treatment. Twelve (33.3%) patients had arterial injuries and 10 (27.8%) patients had venous injuries. The patients who had deep injuries showed significant difference against the patient with superficial injury (98.0 vs. 129.1, p=0.008).

Conclusions

Low velocity penetrating injury confined to the neck is able to be successfully treated with prompt surgical management. Regardless of the conditions which are evaluated at emergency department, all penetrating neck injury patients should be regarded as urgent surgical candidates.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury