Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
7 "Jin Young Lee"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Case Report
Surgical management of supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma in Korea: three case reports
Su Young Yoon, Junepill Seok, Yook Kim, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Young Lee, Mou Seop Lee, Hong Rye Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):399-403.   Published online December 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0073
  • 195 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a rare but life-threatening complication following traumatic brain injury. However, the literature on SIEDH is sparse, consisting only of a few small series. Prompt diagnosis and the application of appropriate surgical techniques are crucial for the rapid and safe management of SIEDH. Herein, we present three cases of SIEDH treated at our institution, employing a range of surgical approaches.
Summary
Original Article
Clinical characteristics and mortality risk factors among trauma patients by age groups at a single center in Korea over 7 years: a retrospective study
Jonghee Han, Su Young Yoon, Junepill Seok, Jin Young Lee, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Bong Ye, Younghoon Sul, Seheon Kim, Hong Rye Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):329-336.   Published online November 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0035
  • 465 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
In this study, we aimed to compare the characteristics of patients with trauma by age group in a single center in Korea to identify the clinical characteristics and analyze the risk factors affecting mortality.
Methods
Patients aged ≥18 years who visited the Chungbuk National University Hospital Regional Trauma Center between January 2016 and December 2022 were included. The accident mechanism, severity of the injury, and outcomes were compared by classifying the patients into group A (18–64 years), group B (65–79 years), and group C (≥80 years). In addition, logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting death.
Results
The most common injury mechanism was traffic accidents in group A (40.9%) and slipping in group B (37.0%) and group C (56.2%). Although group A had the highest intensive care unit admission rate (38.0%), group C had the highest mortality rate (9.5%). In the regression analysis, 3 to 8 points on the Glasgow Coma Scale had the highest odds ratio for mortality, and red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours, intensive care unit admission, age, and Injury Severity Score were the predictors of death.
Conclusions
For patients with trauma, the mechanism, injured body region, and severity of injury differed among the age groups. The high mortality rate of elderly patients suggests the need for different treatment approaches for trauma patients according to age. Identifying factors affecting clinical patterns and mortality according to age groups can help improve the prognosis of trauma patients in the future.
Summary
Case Report
Visual Disturbance Caused by a Nail Gun-Induced Penetrating Brain Injury
Jin Bong Ye, Young Hoon Sul, Se Heon Kim, Jin Young Lee, Jin Suk Lee, Hong Rye Kim, Soo Young Yoon, Jung Hee Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):203-207.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0030
  • 2,263 View
  • 63 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Penetrating brain injury caused by a nail gun is an uncommon clinical scenario reported in the literature. A 36-year-old male presented with a nail that had penetrated through the occipital bone. He was alert and neurologically intact except for visual disturbance. Computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed the nail lodged at the occipital lobe and the parietal lobe, with minimal intracerebral hemorrhage. The nail was placed in the occipital lobe close to the superior sagittal sinus. We removed the nail with craniotomy since the entrance of the nail was close to the superior sagittal sinus. There were no newly developed neurological deficits postoperatively. Immediate postoperative CT showed no newly developed lesions. The patient recovered well without any significant complications. Two weeks postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging showed no remarkable lesions. The visual disturbance was followed up at the outpatient department. To summarize, we report a rare case of penetrating head injury by a nail gun and discuss relevant aspects of the clinical management.

Summary
Original Article
The Influence of Seasons and Weather on the Volume of Trauma Patients: 4 Years of Experience at a Single Regional Trauma Center
Se Heon Kim, Young Hoon Sul, Jin Young Lee, Joong Suck Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(1):21-30.   Published online March 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0027
  • 3,250 View
  • 94 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of seasons and weather on the volume of trauma patients in central Korea.

Methods

The records of 4,665 patients treated at Chungbuk National Hospital Regional Trauma Center from January 2016 to December 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. Meteorological data including hourly temperature (°C), precipitation (mm), humidity (%), and wind speed (m/s) for each district were collected retrospectively. Statistical analysis was done using the independent <i>t</i>-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression analysis.

Results

Patients’ average age was 53.66 years, with a significant difference between men (49.92 years) and women (60.48 years) (p<0.001). Rolling/slipping down was a prominent cause of injury in winter (28.4%, n=283), with statistical significance (p<0.001). Trauma occurred least frequently in winter (p=0.005). Linear regression analysis revealed an increasing number of patients as the temperature increased (p<0.05), the humidity increased (p<0.001), and the wind speed decreased (p<0.001). Precipitation did not affect patient volume (p=0.562). One-way ANOVA revealed a decreased incidence of trauma when the temperature exceeded 30°C (p<0.001), and when the humidity was more than 75%, compared to 25–50% and 50–75%.

Conclusions

At the regional trauma center of Chungbuk National University Hospital, in central Korea, the number of trauma patients was lowest in winter, and patient volume was affected by temperature, humidity, and wind speed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The impact of COVID-19 on trauma patients and orthopedic trauma operations at a single focused training center for trauma in Korea
    Wonseok Choi, Hanju Kim, Whee Sung Son, Seungyeob Sakong, Jun-Min Cho, Nak-Jun Choi, Tae-Wook Noh, Namryeol Kim, Jae-Woo Cho, Jong-Keon Oh
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2022; 35(3): 195.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Chronic Traumatic Glass Foreign Body Removal from the Lung through a Direct Parenchymal Incision
Su Young Yoon, Si Wook Kim, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Young Lee, Jin Bong Ye, Se Heon Kim, Young Hoon Sul
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(4):248-251.   Published online December 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.031
  • 3,632 View
  • 56 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Traumatic intrapulmonary glass foreign bodies that are missed on an initial examination can migrate and lead to severe complications. Here, we present a rare case of a traumatic intrapulmonary glass foreign body surgically removed by a direct pulmonary incision, which preserved the pulmonary parenchyma and avoided severe complications caused by migration.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Thoracoscopic retrieval of an intrapulmonary sewing needle: A case report
    Houssem Messaoudi, Imen Ben Ismail, Wafa Ragmoun, Hatem Lahdhili, Saber Hachicha, Slim Chenik
    Clinical Case Reports.2020; 8(12): 2494.     CrossRef
Experience of Penetrating Gunshot Wound on Head in Korea
Hong Rye Kim, Seung Je Go, Young Hoon Sul, Jin Bong Ye, Jin Young Lee, Jung Hee Choi, Seoung Myoung Choi, Yook Kim, Su Young Yoon
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(2):82-86.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.2.82
  • 6,231 View
  • 57 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Craniocerebral gunshot injuries (CGIs) are extremely seldom happened in Korea because possession of individual firearm is illegal. So, CGIs are rarely encountered by Korean neurosurgeons or Korean trauma surgeons, though in other developing countries or Unites states of America their cases are indefatigably increasing. Management goal should focus on early aggressive, vigorous resuscitation. The treatments consist of immediate life salvage through correction of coagulopathy, intracranial decompression, prevention of infection and preservation of nervous tissue. There have been few studies involving penetrating CGIs in Korea. Here we present a case of penetrating gunshot wound in Korea. We present a 58-year-old man who was unintentionally shot by his colleague with a shotgun. The patients underwent computed tomography (CT) for assessment of intracranial injury. The bullet passed through the left parietal bone and right lateral ventricle and exited through the posterior auricular right temporal bone. After CT scan, he arrested and the cardiopulmonary resuscitation was conducted immediately. But we were unable to resuscitate him. This case report underscores the importance of the initial clinical exam and CT studies along with adequate resuscitation to make the appropriate management decision. Physicians should be familiar with the various injury patterns and imaging findings which are poor prognostic indicators.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Civilian penetrating traumatic brain injury: A 5-year single-center experience
    Omid Yousefi, Pouria Azami, Roham Borazjani, Amin Niakan, Mahnaz Yadollahi, Hosseinali Khalili
    Surgical Neurology International.2023; 14: 28.     CrossRef
Original Article
Prevalences of Incidental Findings in Trauma Patients by Abdominal and Pelvic Computed Tomography
Jin Young Lee, Myung Jae Jung, Jae Gil Lee, Seung Hwan Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(3):61-67.   Published online September 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.3.61
  • 2,058 View
  • 22 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (APCT) is frequently used as a diagnostic tool in trauma patients. However, trauma unrelated, incidental findings are frequently encountered. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalences of incidental findings on APCT scans in trauma patients.
METHODS
The archived records of 801 trauma patients treated from January 2013 to December 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Six hundred and forty of these patients underwent contrast enhanced APCT in an emergency department and were included in this study, and 205 (32.1%) of these patients had incidental findings. These findings were divided into two categories: category I, meaning a radiological benign finding not requiring further evaluation or follow- up, and category II, requiring further evaluation and follow-up.
RESULTS
One hundred and sixty (24.8%) patients were allocated to category I and 45 (7.2%) to category II. The most frequent incidental findings were discovered in kidneys (34.6%), followed by liver (28.8%), and gallbladder (15.6%). The most frequent finding in category I was a benign cyst (60.1%), followed by a simple stone (15.6%), and hemangioma (11.9%). Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder (17.8%) was the most common lesion in category II, followed by atypical mass (15.6%), complicated stone (15.6%) and cystic neoplasm (15.6%).
CONCLUSION
The prevalence of an incidental finding on APCT scans was 32.1%. Although category II lesions were not common in trauma patients, these findings should be communicated to patients, and when necessary referred to a primary care physician. Systems are required for producing appropriate discharge summaries and informing patients about the implications of incidental findings.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidental Cancer Diagnoses in Trauma Patients: A Case–Control Study Evaluating Long-term Outcomes
    Nathaniel Bell, Amanda Arrington, Swann Arp Adams, Mark Jones, Joseph V. Sakran, Ambar Mehta, Jan M. Eberth
    Journal of Surgical Research.2019; 242: 304.     CrossRef
  • Filling the void: a low-cost, high-yield approach to addressing incidental findings in trauma patients
    Nicholas Sich, Andrew Rogers, Danelle Bertozzi, Praveen Sabapathi, Waed Alswealmeen, Philip Lim, Jonathan Sternlieb, Laura Gartner, James Yuschak, Orlando Kirton, Ryan Shadis
    Surgery.2018; 163(4): 657.     CrossRef

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury