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J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

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4 "Jae Il Kim"
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Original Articles
Could the Injury Severity Score be a new indicator for surgical treatment in patients with traumatic splenic injury?
HyeJeong Jeong, SungWon Jung, Tae Gil Heo, Pyong Wha Choi, Jae Il Kim, Sung Min Jung, Heungman Jun, Yong Chan Shin, Eunhae Um
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):189-194.   Published online May 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0065
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  • 66 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to determine whether a higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) could serve as an indicator of splenectomy in patients with traumatic splenic lacerations.
Methods
A total of 256 cases of splenic laceration were collected from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2018. After the application of exclusion criteria, 105 were eligible for this study. Charts were reviewed for demographic characteristics, initial vital signs upon presentation to the emergency room, Glasgow Coma Scale, computed tomography findings, ISS, and treatment strategies. The cases were then divided into nonsplenectomy and splenectomy groups for analysis.
Results
When analyzed with the chi-square test and t-test, splenectomy was associated with a systolic blood pressure lower than 90 mmHg, a Glasgow Coma Scale score lower than 13, active bleeding found on computed tomography, a splenic laceration grade greater than or equal to 4, and an ISS greater than 15 at presentation. However, in multivariate logistic regression analysis, only active bleeding on computed tomography showed a statistically significant relationship (P=0.014).
Conclusions
Although ISS failed to show a statistically significant independent relationship with splenectomy, it may still play a supplementary role in traumatic splenic injury management.
Summary
The Prognosis of Traumatic Small Bowel Injury Accompanied by Liver Injury
Yu Seong Noh, Sung Won Jung, Tae Gil Heo, Pyong Wha Choi, Jae Il Kim, Heung Man Jun, Yong Chan Shin, Sung Min Jung, Eun Hae Um
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(1):44-49.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0052
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  • 99 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

The aim of this study was to elucidate the prognosis, and other clinical features, such as time to surgery and the amount of transfusion, of small bowel injury (SBI) accompanied by liver injury (LI).

Methods

We investigated 221 patients with SBI who visited an emergency center from October 2000 to March 2019. We excluded patients with injuries that directly led to mortality, and the remaining 149 patients were divided into the SBI alone (SBI-A) group and the SBI accompanied by LI (SBI-LI) group. Data were collected for preoperative and surgical outcome variables, and the treatment results were compared between groups.

Results

The SBI-LI group had a higher mortality rate than the SBI-A group (22.4% vs. 14.3%), but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.061). There were no significant differences between the SBI-A and SBI-LI groups, except for the amount of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (SBI-A: 3.53±0.1 vs. SBI-LI: 8.38±0.7 packs, p=0.035) and the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (SBI-A: 6.7±0.2 vs. SBI-LI: 11.1±0.5 days, p=0.047).

Conclusions

The SBI-LI group required more RBC transfusions and longer ICU stays than the SBI-A group. SBI accompanied by LI may show higher mortality than SBI alone; however, since the difference was not statistically significant in the present study, larger-scale follow-up research is needed.

Summary
Clinical Outcomes and Risk Factors of Traumatic Pancreatic Injuries
Hong Tae Lee, Jae Il Kim, Pyong Wha Choi, Je Hoon Park, Tae Gil Heo, Myung Soo Lee, Chul Nam Kim, Surk Hyo Chang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(1):1-6.
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Even though traumatic pancreatic injuries occur in only 0.2% to 4% of all abdominal injuries, the morbidity and the mortality rates associated with pancreatic injuries remain high. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of traumatic pancreatic injuries and to identify predictors of mortality and morbidity.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 26 consecutive patients with a pancreatic injury who underwent a laparotomy from January 2000 to December 2010. The data collected included demographic data, the mechanism of injury, the initial vital signs, the grade of pancreatic injury, the injury severity score (ISS), the revised trauma score (RTS), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the number of abbreviated injury scales (AIS), the number of associated injuries, the initial laboratory findings, the amount of blood transfusion, the type of operation, the mortality, the morbidity, and others.
RESULTS
The overall mortality rate in our series was 23.0%, and the morbidity rate was 76.9%. Twenty patients (76.9%) had associated injuries to either intra-abdominal organs or extra-abdominal organs. Two patients (7.7%) underwent external drainage, and 18 patients (69.3%) underwent a distal pancreatectomy. Pancreaticoduodenectomies were performed in 6 patients (23.0%). Three patients underwent a re-laparotomy due to anastomosis leakage or postoperative bleeding, and all patients died. The univariate analysis revealed 11 factors (amount of transfusion, AAST grade, re-laparotomy, associated duodenal injury, base excess, APACHE II score, type of operation, operation time, RTS, associated colon injury, GCS) to be significantly associated with mortality (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION
Whenever a surgeon manages a patient with traumatic pancreatic injury, the surgeon needs to consider the predictive risk factors. And, if possible, the patient should undergo a proper and meticulous, less invasive surgical procedure.
Summary
Case Report
Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Blunt Renal Trauma
Eun Hong Jung, Eun Suk Kim, Hyoung Chul Park, Geun Bae Mun, Seok Heun Jang, Jae Il Kim, Jung Hwan Son, Yeong Rok Ha
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):260-263.
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Renal artery pseudoaneurysm after blunt renal trauma is an uncommon complication of delayed hemorrhage, and diagnostic difficulties are experienced due to its rarity. Delayed hemorrhage after renal trauma is a lifethreatening complication. Angiography is considered the gold standard to diagnose a traumatic renal artery pseudoaneurysm. We report here a case of delayed bleeding from a renal artery pseudoaneurysm that was diagnosed at 17 days after the injury and that was managed successfully with selective renal artery embolization without medical complication.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury