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Case Reports
Atypical Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fracture of the proximal femur in the United Kingdom: a case report challenged by myeloma, osteoporosis, infection, and recurrent implant failures
Sayantan Saha, Azeem Ahmed, Rama Mohan
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):89-96.   Published online March 18, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0069
  • 342 View
  • 10 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The indications for total hip replacement are increasing and not limited to osteoarthritis. Total hip replacement may also be done for trauma and pathological fractures in patients otherwise physiologically fit and active. This trend has led to an inevitable rise in complications such as periprosthetic femoral fracture. Periprosthetic femoral fracture can be challenging due to poor bone quality, osteoporosis, and stress fractures. We present a case of periprosthetic femoral fracture in a 71-year-old woman with some components of an atypical femoral fracture. The fracture was internally fixed but was subsequently complicated by infection, implant failure needing revision, and later stress fracture. She was on a bisphosphonate after her index total hip replacement surgery for an impending pathological left proximal femur fracture, and this may have caused the later stress fracture. Unfortunately, she then experienced implant breakage (nonunion), which was treated with a biplanar locking plate and bone grafting. The patient finally regained her premorbid mobility 13 months after the last surgery and progressed satisfactorily towards bony union.
Summary
Pneumoperitoneum from vaginal cuff dehiscence following blunt trauma in a patient with a history of robotic hysterectomy in Korea: a case report
Byung Hee Kang, Donghwan Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):83-85.   Published online February 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0078
  • 433 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pneumoperitoneum usually presents as a surgical emergency, especially in patients with a history of trauma. However, we recently encountered an atypical case of pneumoperitoneum at a hysterectomy site following blunt trauma, indicating that immediate laparotomy may not always be necessary. In this report, we present the case of a 45-year-old woman who was transferred to our trauma center from a local hospital after being involved in a traffic accident the day before. Although she underwent an emergency laparotomy, no bowel perforation was detected. Instead, a rupture was found at the site of a hysterectomy that had been performed 8 months earlier. After repairing the hysterectomy site, the pneumoperitoneum resolved, and the patient was subsequently discharged without further complications.
Summary
An unstable patient with a large sucking chest wound managed with gauze packing for preventing tension and bleeding control before surgery in Korea: a case report
Chang-Sin Lee, Min-Jeong Cho, Tae-Wook Noh, Nak-Jun Choi, Jun-Min Cho
Received September 18, 2023  Accepted November 29, 2023  Published online February 23, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0066    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 249 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This case report describes the management of a 51-year-old female patient who arrived at the emergency room with a stab wound to the upper right chest. Immediate medical interventions were undertaken, including blood transfusions and endotracheal intubation. To prevent tension and control bleeding, gauze packing was applied directly through the large open wound. Further surgical exploration identified a laceration in the lung, necessitating a right upper lobe resection. Postoperatively, the patient's vital signs stabilized, and she was subsequently discharged without complications. This case highlights the decision-making process in selecting between an emergency department thoracotomy and an operating room thoracotomy for patients with penetrating chest trauma. It also illustrates the role of gauze packing in managing tension and hemorrhage. In summary, gauze packing can be an effective interim measure for stabilizing patients with traumatic injuries, unstable vital signs, and large open chest wounds, particularly when a chest tube is already in place, to prevent tension and facilitate bleeding control prior to surgical intervention.
Summary
Misinterpretation of a skin fold artifact as pneumothorax on the chest x-ray of a trauma patient in Korea: a case report
Yoojin Park, Eun Young Kim, Byungchul Yu, Kunwoo Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):86-88.   Published online February 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0050
  • 480 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Misinterpreting radiographic findings can lead to unnecessary interventions and potential patient harm. The urgency required when responding to the compromised health of trauma patients can increase the likelihood of misinterpreting chest x-rays in critical situations. We present the case report of a trauma patient whose skin fold artifacts were mistaken for pneumothorax on a follow-up chest x-ray, resulting in unnecessary chest tube insertion. We hope to help others differentiate between skin folds and pneumothorax on the chest x-rays of trauma patients by considering factors such as location, shape, sharpness, and vascular markings.
Summary
Treatment of a penetrating inferior vena cava injury using doctor-helicopter emergency medical service and direct-to-operating room resuscitation in Korea: a case report
Dongmin Seo, Jieun Kim, Jiwon Kim, Inhae Heo, Jonghwan Moon, Kyoungwon Jung, Hohyung Jung
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):74-78.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0055
  • 739 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries can have fatal outcomes and are associated with high mortality rates. Patients with IVC injuries require multiple procedures, including prehospital care, surgical techniques, and postoperative care. We present the case of a 67-year-old woman who stabbed herself in the abdomen with a knife, resulting in an infrarenal IVC injury. We shortened the transfer time by transporting the patient using a helicopter and decided to perform direct-to-operating room resuscitation by a trauma physician in the helicopter. The patient underwent laparotomy with IVC ligation for damage control during the first operation. The second- and third-look operations, including previous suture removal, IVC reconstruction, and IVC thrombectomy, were performed by a trauma surgeon specializing in cardiovascular diseases. The patient was discharged without major complications on the 19th postoperative day with rivaroxaban as an anticoagulant medication. Computed tomography angiography at the outpatient clinic showed that thrombi in the IVC and both iliac veins had been completely removed. Patients with IVC injuries can be effectively treated using a trauma system that includes fast transportation by helicopter, damage control for rapid hemostasis, and expert treatment of IVC injuries.
Summary
Conservative treatment of corpus callosum hemorrhage due to a falling coconut in Indonesia: a case report
Hanan Anwar Rusidi, Ferry Wijanarko
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):79-82.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0052
  • 464 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The potential for traumatic brain injury resulting from falling coconuts is frequently overlooked. These incidents can cause focal lesions in the form of brain hemorrhage. Corpus callosum hemorrhage due to blunt trauma from a falling object is rare and typically associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this report is to detail a case of corpus callosum hemorrhage caused by a coconut fall and to discuss the conservative management approach employed. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted to the hospital with symptoms of unconsciousness, headache, and expressive aphasia after being struck by a falling coconut. Notably, hemorrhage was detected within the body of the corpus callosum, as revealed by imaging findings. The patient received intensive monitoring and treatment in the intensive care unit, including oxygen therapy, saline infusion, an osmotic diuretic, analgesics, and medication to prevent stress ulcers. The patient demonstrated marked clinical improvement while undergoing conservative treatment. Despite the typically unfavorable prognosis of these rare injuries, our patient exhibited meaningful clinical improvement with conservative treatment. Timely diagnosis and appropriate interventions were crucial in managing the patient’s condition. This report emphasizes the importance of considering traumatic brain injury caused by falling coconuts and highlights the need for further research and awareness in this area.
Summary
Surgical management of supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma in Korea: three case reports
Su Young Yoon, Junepill Seok, Yook Kim, Jin Suk Lee, Jin Young Lee, Mou Seop Lee, Hong Rye Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):399-403.   Published online December 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0073
  • 433 View
  • 37 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Supratentorial and infratentorial epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a rare but life-threatening complication following traumatic brain injury. However, the literature on SIEDH is sparse, consisting only of a few small series. Prompt diagnosis and the application of appropriate surgical techniques are crucial for the rapid and safe management of SIEDH. Herein, we present three cases of SIEDH treated at our institution, employing a range of surgical approaches.
Summary
A method of bedside urethrography before catheterization in pelvic trauma in Korea: a case report
Hojun Lee, Sung Yub Jeong, Kun Hwang
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):451-453.   Published online December 20, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0047
  • 243 View
  • 7 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
We introduce a convenient method of urethrography before catheterization for patients with pelvic trauma that can be used in a resuscitation area. A 10-mL syringe without a needle was used. X-ray contrast medium (Iohexol, 300 mg I/mL) was administered through the urethral orifice using a 10-mL syringe without needle and a simple pelvic anteroposterior film was taken (70 kilovolt [peak], 50 mAs). A 36-year-old soldier with a saddle injury from a gun barrel was taken to a trauma center. He had a pelvic fracture and complained of hematuria. Bedside urethrography above described was performed. The anterior urethra showed nonspecific findings, but dye leaked from the posterior urethra. Bedside Foley catheter insertion was attempted, but the catheter could not be advanced past the membranous urethra. Thereafter, suprapubic catheterization was performed. On the day of the injury, iliac artery embolization was carried out. The dislocated sacroiliac joint was also treated using open reduction and internal fixation. On hospital day 7, guidewire Foley insertion was performed. This bedside urethrography technique is simple and useful for pelvic fractures in which urethral injury is suspected.
Summary
Various injury patterns due to combustion (typical but unfamiliar to physicians and easy to miss) in Korea: a case report
Hyung Il Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):393-398.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0060
  • 345 View
  • 15 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Patients transported from fire sites may exhibit various injury patterns. Major trauma, skin burn, inhalation burn, and carbon monoxide poisoning are typical injuries. However, most physicians may be unfamiliar that cyanide poisoning can frequently occur due to combustion. Cyanide poisoning is highly significant owing to high mortality and the existence of antidotes. I present a 35-year-old man who was transported from a burning building and suffered severe metabolic acidosis despite no major bleeding as well as mild carbon monoxide poisoning. I suspected cyanide poisoning and administered the antidote; subsequently, the patient showed improvement. The next day, sudden airway obstruction developed, and emergency endotracheal intubation was performed. The inhalation damage was detected only in the lower airway tract and not in the upper airway. Physicians should be aware of cyanide poisoning and inhalation burn to avoid missing treatment opportunities.
Summary
Expediting venous drainage in large anterolateral thigh flaps for scalp electrical burns in India: two case reports on the use of primary vein grafts for second vein anastomosis
Jyotica Jagadish Chawaria, Parvati Ravula, Nazia Tabassum, Srikanth Rangachari
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):404-410.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0054
  • 490 View
  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Large scalp defects resulting from high-voltage electrical burns require free flaps, preferably skin, to permit optimal coverage and enable future or simultaneous cranial vault reconstruction. The anterolateral thigh permits the harvest of a large area of skin supplied by a reliable perforator. The superficial temporal vessels offer the proximate choice of recipient vessels to enable adequate reach and coverage. The lack of a second vein at this site implies the inability to perform a second venous anastomosis; however, this obstacle can be overcome by using an interposition vein graft, to the neck veins primarily. This assures adequate venous drainage and complete flap survival.
Summary
A rare and unique experience of a blunt intrathoracic traumatic injury of the trachea and its management in South Africa: a case report
Rudo Mutsa Vanessa Pswarayi, Anna Katariina Kerola
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):416-420.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0036
  • 366 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt intrathoracic tracheal injuries are rare, even among blunt chest trauma patients. An early diagnosis based on a high index of suspicion allows for timely surgical management of potentially fatal airway trauma, thereby improving overall outcomes. Diagnosing these injuries can be difficult due to their nonspecific clinical features and the occasional difficulty in radiologic diagnosis. If a patient exhibits respiratory compromise with difficult ventilation and poor lung expansion, despite the insertion and management of an intercostal drain following high-energy blunt trauma, there should be a heightened suspicion of potential airway trauma. The aim of primary repair is to restore airway integrity and to minimize the loss of pulmonary parenchyma function. This case report discusses the rare clinical presentation of a patient with blunt trauma to the intrathoracic airway, the surgical management thereof, and his overall outcome. Although blunt traumatic injuries of the trachea are extremely rare and often fatal, early surgical intervention can potentially reduce the risk of mortality.
Summary
Bleeding control of an injury to the infrarenal inferior vena cava and right external iliac vein by ipsilateral internal iliac artery and superficial femoral vein ligation after blunt abdominal trauma in Korea: a case report
Hoonsung Park, Maru Kim, Dae Sang Lee, Tae Hwa Hong, Doo-Hun Kim, Hang joo Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):441-446.   Published online November 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0019
  • 558 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries, while accounting for fewer than 0.5% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, are among the most difficult to manage. Despite advancements in prehospital care, transportation, operative techniques, and perioperative management, the mortality rate for IVC injuries has remained at 20% to 66% for several decades. Furthermore, 30% to 50% of patients with IVC injuries succumb during the prehospital phase. A 65-year-old male patient, who had been struck in the back by a 500-kg excavator shovel at a construction site, was transported to a regional trauma center. Injuries to the right side of the infrarenal IVC and the right external iliac vein (EIV) were suspected, along with fractures to the right iliac bone and sacrum. The injury to the right side of the infrarenal IVC wall was repaired, and the right internal iliac artery was ligated. However, persistent bleeding around the right EIV was observed, and we were unable to achieve proximal and distal control of the right EIV. Attempts at prolonged manual compression were unsuccessful. To decrease venous return, we ligated the right superficial femoral vein. This reduced the amount of bleeding, enabling us to secure the surgical field. We ultimately controlled the bleeding, and approximately 5 L of blood products were infused intraoperatively. A second-look operation was performed 2 days later, by which time most of the bleeding sites had ceased. Orthopedic surgeons then took over the operation, performing closed reduction and external fixation. Five days later, the patient underwent definitive fixation and was transferred for rehabilitation on postoperative day 22.
Summary
Radiological assessment and follow-up of a nonsurgically treated odontoid process fracture after a motor vehicle accident in Egypt: a case report
Ahmad Mokhtar Abodahab
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):411-415.   Published online November 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0039
  • 515 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
An odontoid process fracture is a serious type of cervical spine injury. This injury is categorized into three types based on the location of the fracture. Severe or even fatal neurological deficits can occur due to associated cord injury, which can result in complete quadriplegia. Computed tomography is the primary diagnostic tool, while magnetic resonance imaging is used to evaluate any associated cord injuries. These injuries can occur either directly from the injury or during transportation to the hospital if mishandled. There are two main treatment approaches: surgical fixation or external nonsurgical fixation, with various types and models of fixation devices available. In this case study, computed tomography follow-up confirmed that external fixation can yield successful results in terms of complete healing, even in cases complicated by other factors that may impede healing, such as pregnancy.
Summary
Massive traumatic abdominal wall hernia in pediatric multitrauma in Australia: a case report
Sarah Douglas-Seidl, Camille Wu
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):447-450.   Published online November 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0023
  • 432 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare presentation, most commonly reported in the context of motor vehicle accidents and associated with blunt abdominal injuries and handlebar injuries in the pediatric population. A 13-year-old boy presented with multiple traumatic injuries and hemodynamic instability after a high-speed motor vehicle accident. His injuries consisted of massive traumatic abdominal wall hernia (grade 4) with bowel injury and perforation, blunt aortic injury, a Chance fracture, hemopneumothorax, and a humeral shaft fracture. Initial surgical management included partial resection of the terminal ileum, sigmoid colon, and descending colon. Laparostomy was managed with negative pressure wound therapy. The patient underwent skin-only primary closure of the abdominal wall and required multiple returns to theatre for debridement, dressing changes, and repair of other injuries. Various surgical management options for abdominal wall closure were considered. In total, he underwent 36 procedures. The multiple injuries had competing management aims, which required close collaboration between specialist clinicians to form an individualized management plan. The severity and complexity of this injury was of a scale not previously experienced by many clinicians and benefited from intrahospital and interhospital specialist collaboration. The ideal aim of primary surgical repair was not possible in this case of a giant abdominal wall defect.
Summary
Successful nonoperative management of a simultaneous high-grade splenic injury and devascularized kidney in Australia: a case report
Peter Thanh Tam Nguyen, Jeremy M. Hsu
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):431-434.   Published online September 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0017
  • 532 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe blunt injuries to isolated solid abdominal viscera have been previously managed nonoperatively; however, management algorithms for simultaneous visceral injuries are less well defined. We report a polytrauma case of a 33-year-old man involved in a motorbike collision who presented with left-sided chest and abdominal pain. Initial imaging demonstrated multiple solid organ injuries with American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grade V splenic injury and complete devascularization of the left kidney. The patient underwent urgent angioembolic coiling of the distal splenic artery with successful nonoperative management of simultaneous grade V solid organ injuries.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury