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Ugochukwu Uzodimma Nnadozie 2 Articles
Experience with the emergency vascular repair of upper limb arterial transection with concurrent acute compartment syndrome: two case reports
Charles Chidiebele Maduba, Ugochukwu Uzodimma Nnadozie, Victor Ifeanyichukwu Modekwe
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(1):60-64.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0007
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Upper extremity vascular injuries occurring with acute compartment syndrome are very challenging to manage in an emergency context in resource-poor settings. The need to always recognize the likelihood of coexisting compartment syndrome guides surgeons to perform concomitant fasciotomy to ensure a better outcome. We managed three vascular injuries in the upper extremities in two patients with concomitant imminent compartment syndrome observed intraoperatively. The first injury was complete brachial artery disruption following blunt trauma, while the second and third injuries were radial and ulnar artery transection caused by sharp glass cuts. Both patients were treated with vascular repair and fasciotomy. Secondary wound coverage was applied with split-thickness skin grafting, and the outcomes were satisfactory. Concomitant fasciotomy potentially improves the outcomes of vascular repair in emergency vascular surgery and should be considered for all injuries with the potential for acute compartment syndrome.
Summary
Successful management of a Comatose Patient with Traumatic Brain Exposure with a fronto-Parieto-occipital flap
Charles Chidiebele Maduba, Ugochukwu Uzodimma Nnadozie
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):48-52.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.037
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Composite skull defects in patients with severe head injuries are very challenging to manage. The dilemma when deciding whether to perform a definitive reconstruction is how long to wait for physiological recovery before an intervention complicates the situation. The inability of such patients to tolerate prolonged anesthetic exposure is a driving factor for performing the minimal intervention necessary to facilitate recovery. Herein, we present a case involving the successful immediate reconstructive treatment of a severely head-injured adolescent with a composite scalp defect secondary to trauma. A 14-year-old boy sustained a severe head injury from a motor vehicle accident with a composite scalp defect in the right fronto-parietal region. The frontal lobe was exposed, and the right eye was crushed and devitalized. The patient was deeply unconscious for 3 days, without any significant improvements before reconstructive surgery was proposed due to fear of possible meningitis resulting from the exposure of brain structures. We successfully managed the patient with a fronto-parieto-occipital flap, after which the patient promptly recovered consciousness.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury