Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Author index
Search
Nebyou Seyoum 1 Article
Acute pain management in the trauma patient population: are we doing enough? A prospective observational study
Segni Kejela, Nebyou Seyoum
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):151-158.   Published online June 3, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0068
  • 2,491 View
  • 144 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
There is a strong correlation between trauma and pain. Pain increases the rate of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and even mortality in trauma patients.
Methods
This institution-based, provider-blinded and patient-blinded, observational study was conducted among trauma patients treated at a specialized center . Over the course of 3 months, this study included patients who had no prior pain management at other hospitals before presentation, and who presented within 24 hours of the traumatic event.
Results
Of the 74 patients evaluated, none of the patients had their pain level scored. The researcher-provided pain scale showed a severe subjective pain score for 79.7% of the patients and a severe functional activity score for 59.5% of the patients. Analgesia was provided at an average of 55.4 minutes after presentation and all patients received either diclofenac or tramadol. Satisfactory pain reduction after analgesia was 28.8% for patients initially complaining of severe pain, 54.6% for moderate pain, and 66.7% for mild pain, with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.05). Forty percent of patients discharged home received no analgesia after the first dose provided upon presentation.
Conclusions
Pain scoring was nonexistent during the course of the study. The poor utilization rate of analgesia combination and opioids led to unsatisfactory pain outcomes in patients evaluated and followed for 24 hours after presentation.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury