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Jayun Cho 7 Articles
Ruptured uterus in a 36-week pregnant patient with hemorrhagic shock after blunt trauma in Korea: a case report
Sebeom Jeon, Suyoung Park, Soohyun Oh, Jayun Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):281-285.   Published online January 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0070
  • 1,218 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic uterine rupture is uncommon but can be fatal and life-threatening for both the mother and infant. In addition to complications caused by trauma itself, such as pelvic fracture, gestational complications such as placental abruption, abortion, premature labor, rupture of membranes, maternal death, and stillbirth can occur. In particular, fetuses have been reported to have a high mortality rate in cases of traumatic uterine rupture. A 36-year-old pregnant female patient fell from the fourth floor and was admitted to our trauma center. We observed large hemoperitoneum, pelvic fractures, and spleen laceration, and the fetus was presumed to be located outside the uterus. The pregnant woman was hemodynamically unstable. Although the fetus was stillborn, angioembolization and surgical treatment were properly performed through collaboration with an interventional radiologist, obstetrician, and trauma surgeons. After two orthopedic operations, the patient was discharged after 34 days. This case report suggests the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of pregnant trauma patients.
Summary
Epidemiology and outcomes of patients with penetrating trauma in Incheon Metropolitan City, Korea based on National Emergency Department Information System data: a retrsopective cohort study
Youngmin Kim, Byungchul Yu, Se-Beom Jeon, Seung Hwan Lee, Jayun Cho, Jihun Gwak, Youngeun Park, Kang Kook Choi, Min A Lee, Gil Jae Lee, Jungnam Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):224-230.   Published online December 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0055
  • 1,401 View
  • 46 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Patients with penetrating injuries are at a high risk of mortality, and many of them require emergency surgery. Proper triage and transfer of the patient to the emergency department (ED), where immediate definitive treatment is available, is key to improving survival. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with penetrating torso injuries in Incheon Metropolitan City.
Methods
Data from trauma patients between 2014 and 2018 (5 years) were extracted from the National Emergency Department Information System. In this study, patients with penetrating injuries to the torso (chest and abdomen) were selected, while those with superficial injuries were excluded.
Results
Of 66,285 patients with penetrating trauma, 752 with injuries to the torso were enrolled in this study. In the study population, 345 patients (45.9%) were admitted to the ward or intensive care unit (ICU), 20 (2.7%) were transferred to other hospitals, and 10 (1.3%) died in the ED. Among the admitted patients, 173 (50.1%) underwent nonoperative management and 172 (49.9%) underwent operative management. There were no deaths in the nonoperative management group, but 10 patients (5.8%) died after operative management. The transferred patients showed a significantly longer time from injury to ED arrival, percentage of ICU admissions, and mortality. There were also significant differences in the percentage of operative management, ICU admissions, ED stay time, and mortality between hospitals.
Conclusions
Proper triage guidelines need to be implemented so that patients with torso penetrating trauma in Incheon can be transferred directly to the regional trauma center for definitive treatment.
Summary
Rare complication of skin necrosis after endoscopic debridement and cutaneo-fascial suture for a massive Morel-Lavallée lesion in Korea: a case report
Youngmin Kim, Jayun Cho, Myung Jin Jang, Kang Kook Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):304-309.   Published online August 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0007
  • 552 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) is a pathologic fluid collection within an abnormally formed space, resulting from an internal degloving injury between the muscle fascia and subcutaneous fat layer. Due to its resistance to conservative treatments such as drainage or compression dressing, various therapeutic methods have been developed for MLL. However, no standardized guidelines currently exist. Recently, endoscopic debridement and cutaneo-fascial suture (EDCS) has been introduced for the treatment of MLL, particularly for large lesions resistant to conservative approaches. While this procedure is known to be effective, limited reports are available on potential complications. The authors present a case of skin necrosis following EDCS for a massive MLL.
Summary
Endovascular treatment of traumatic iliac venous injury combined with phlegmasia cerulea dolens in Korea: a case report
Suyoung Park, Jeong Ho Kim, Jung Han Hwang, Jayun Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):157-160.   Published online December 1, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0039
  • 1,383 View
  • 50 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic iliac venous injury is rare but can be fatal. Although surgical management is considered a primary treatment method, urgent treatment is required when deep venous thrombosis and subsequent phlegmasia cerulea dolens is combined. It is difficult to treat by surgical management, and pharmaceutic thrombolysis cannot be applied due to the trauma history. Here, we describe a case of unilateral traumatic iliac venous injury and subsequent diffuse venous thrombosis in the affected iliofemoral and infrapopliteal veins, combined with phlegmasia cerulea dolens, treated with endovascular management, including bare metal stent insertion and aspiration thrombectomy.
Summary
Successful management of a common carotid artery injury using a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt: a case report
Kang Kook Choi, Jayun Cho, Min A Lee, Soo Min Eun, Yang Bin Jeon
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(Suppl 1):S3-S7.   Published online May 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0032
  • 1,792 View
  • 74 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Penetrating neck injuries are a surgical challenge. In particular, penetrating neck injuries associated with carotid artery injuries have a high mortality rate. Overt external hemorrhage is unanimously considered as an indication for surgical exploration. The authors present a case of successful surgical management for a penetrating common carotid artery injury using a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt (LeMaitre Vascular Inc., Burlington, MA, USA) in a 60-year-old male patient who was transferred to the level 1 trauma center due to a metal fragment piercing his neck while working. Active pulsatile bleeding was observed from the 3-cm-long external wound on the anterior neck in zone II. Emergent neck exploration showed near-total transection of the left common carotid artery just below the carotid bifurcation. After a Pruitt-F3 Carotid Shunt was applied to the injured carotid artery as a temporary vascular shunt, artificial graft interposition was performed for the injured common carotid artery. The patient experienced cerebral infarction as a complication caused by ischemia-reperfusion of the common carotid artery but was discharged in a suitable state for rehabilitation therapy.
Summary
A case report of field amputation: the rescue of an entrapped patient through the "doctor car" system
Byungchul Yu, Gil Jae Lee, Min A Lee, Kang Kook Choi, Jihun Gwak, Youngeun Park, Yong-Cheol Yoon, Jayun Cho, Seung Hwan Lee, Jungnam Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(Suppl 1):S27-S30.   Published online June 15, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0012
  • 2,099 View
  • 73 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
In certain circumstances, invasive procedures such as creation of a surgical airway, insertion of a chest drain, intraosseous puncture, or amputation in the field are necessary. These invasive procedures can save lives. However, emergency medical service teams cannot perform such procedures according to the law in Korea. The upper arm of a 29-year-old male patient was stuck in a huge machine and the emergency medical service team could not rescue the patient. A doctor-car team was dispatched to the scene and the team performed the filed amputation to extricate the patient. He was brought to the trauma center immediately and underwent formal above-elbow amputation. Here we describe a case of field amputation to rescue a patient through a “doctor car” system, along with a literature review.
Summary
Salvation of a solitary kidney in a patient with grade IV renal trauma: a case report
Hyuntack Shin, Ae Jin Sung, Min A Lee, Jayun Cho, Gil Jae Lee, Byungchul Yu, Kang Kook Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(Suppl 1):S18-S22.   Published online June 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0091
  • 1,589 View
  • 48 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
There are many reasons for solitary kidney. Congenital causes include renal agenesis and dysplasia. Acquired causes include nephrectomy performed for reasons including traumatic kidney injury, disease (e.g., renal cell carcinoma), and donation for kidney transplantation. According to the European Association of Urology, the World Society of Emergency Surgery, and the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma guidelines, it is important to preserve the remaining renal function as much as possible when a solitary kidney patient has suffered a traumatic kidney injury. The authors present a case of kidney preservation in a solitary kidney patient with a traumatic grade IV renal injury through non-operative management involving superselective renal artery angioembolization.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury