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Hyun Seok Jung 2 Articles
Successful endovascular embolization for traumatic subcutaneous abdominal wall hematoma via the superficial inferior epigastric artery: a case report
Sung Nam Moon, Sang Hyun Seo, Hyun Seok Jung
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(2):128-130.   Published online June 10, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0079
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AbstractAbstract PDF

Abdominal wall hematoma (AWH) after blunt trauma is common, and most cases can be treated conservatively. More invasive treatment is required in patients with traumatic AWH if active bleeding is identified or there is no response to medical treatment. Herein, we report a case of endovascular embolization for traumatic subcutaneous AWH. Almost endovascular treatment for AHW is done through the deep inferior epigastric artery. However, in this case, the superficial inferior epigastric artery was the bleeding focus and embolization target. After understanding the vascular system of the abdominal wall, an endovascular approach and embolization is a safe and effective treatment option for AWH.

Summary
Splenic Artery Bleeding into the Extraperitoneal Space Mimicking Mesenteric Injury: A Rare Case of Blunt Trauma
Sang Hyun Seo, Hyun Seok Jung, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):141-145.   Published online March 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0076
  • 2,745 View
  • 101 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Splenic injury is a common result of blunt trauma, and bleeding occurs mainly inside the splenic capsule and may leak into the peritoneal space. Herein, we report a case where active bleeding occurred in the splenic artery and only leaked into the extraperitoneal space. This is the first case of this phenomenon in a trauma patient in the English-language literature. Bleeding passed through the peritoneum, leaked into the anterior pararenal space, and continued along the extraperitoneal space to the prevesical space of the pelvis. Therefore, on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan, the bleeding appeared to be in the left paracolic gutter, so we suspected mesenteric bleeding. However, after the CT series was fully reconstructed, we accurately read the scans and confirmed splenic injury with active bleeding. If there had been a suspicion of bowel or mesenteric injury, surgery would have been required, but fortunately surgery could be avoided in this case. The patient was successfully treated with angioembolization.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury