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Chang-Wug Oh 6 Articles
Exchange Nailing for Aseptic Nonunion of the Femoral Shaft after Intramedullary Nailing
Sung-Soo Ha, Chang-Wug Oh, Jae-Wook Jung, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon Park, Seong-Min Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):104-111.   Published online June 19, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.010
  • 8,756 View
  • 218 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Although exchange nailing is a standard method of treating femoral shaft nonunion, various rates of healing, ranging from 72% to 100%, have been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of exchange nailing in femoral shaft nonunion.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 30 cases of aseptic femoral shaft nonunion after intramedullary nailing. The mean postsurgical period of nonunion was 66.8 weeks. A nail at least 2 mm larger in diameter was selected to replace the previous nail after reaming. Distal fixation was performed using at least two interlocking screws. The success of the procedure was determined by the finding of union on simple radiographs. Possible reasons for failure were analyzed, including the location of nonunion, the type of nonunion, and the number of screws used for distal fixation.

Results

Of the 30 cases, 27 achieved primary healing with the technique of exchange nailing. The average time to achieve union was 23.1 weeks (range, 13.7–36.9 weeks). The three failures involved nonunion at the isthmic level (three of 15 cases), not at the infraisthmic level (zero of 15 cases). Of eight cases of oligotrophic nonunion, two (25%) failed to heal, and of 22 cases of hypertrophic nonunion, one (4.5%) failed to heal. Of 11 cases involving two screws at the distal fixation, two (18.2%) failed to heal, and of 19 cases involving three or more screws, one (5.3%) failed to heal. None of these findings was statistically significant.

Conclusions

Exchange nailing may enable successful healing in cases of aseptic nonunion of the femoral shaft. Although nonunion at the isthmic level, oligotrophic nonunion, and weaker distal fixation seemed to be associated with a higher chance of failure, further study is needed to confirm those findings.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intramedullary nailing as a treatment for non-unions of femoral shaft fractures after plating failure: A case series
    Ihsan Oesman, Dody Kurniawan, Anissa Feby Canintika
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2023; 103: 107908.     CrossRef
  • Perioperative Radiographic Predictors of Non-Union in Infra-Isthmal Femoral Shaft Fractures after Antegrade Intramedullary Nailing: A Case–Control Study
    Wei-Cheng Hung, Chin-Jung Hsu, Abhishek Kumar, Chun-Hao Tsai, Hao-Wei Chang, Tsung-Li Lin
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(13): 3664.     CrossRef
Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Operation Waiting Times in Patients Having Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury; with or without Bony Lesions
Jeong Heo, Woo-Kie Min, Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyeong-hyeon Park, Il Seo, Eung-Kyoo Park
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(2):80-85.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.004
  • 3,661 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

To compare the time intervals to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical treatment in patients having traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with and without bony lesions.

Methods

Retrospectively analyzed adult patients visited Kyungpook National University Hospital and underwent surgical treatment for cervical SCI within 24 hours. The patients who were suspected of having cervical SCI underwent plain radiography and computed tomography (CT) upon arrival. After the initial evaluation, we evaluated the MRI findings to determine surgical treatment. Waiting times for MRI and surgery were evaluated.

Results

Thirty-four patients were included. Patients’ mean age was 57 (range, 23-80) years. Patients with definite bony lesions were classified into group A, and 10 cases were identified (fracture-dislocation, seven; fracture alone, three). Patients without bony lesions were classified into group B, and 24 cases were identified (ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, 16; cervical spondylotic myelopathy, eight). Mean intervals between emergency room arrival and start of MRI were 93.60 (±60.08) minutes in group A and 313.75 (±264.89) minutes in group B, and the interval was significantly shorter in group A than in group B (p=0.01). The mean times to surgery were 248.4 (±76.03) minutes in group A and 560.5 (±372.56) minutes in group B, and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). The American Spinal Injury Association scale at the time of arrival showed that group A had a relatively severe neurologic deficit compared with group B (p=0.046). There was no statistical significance, but it seems to be good neurological recovery, if we start treatment sooner among patients treated within 24 hours (p=0.198).

Conclusions

If fracture or dislocation is detected by CT, cervical SCI can be easily predicted resulting in MRI and surgical treatment being performed more rapidly. Additionally, fracture or dislocation tends to cause more severe neurological damage, so it is assumed that rapid diagnosis and treatment are possible.

Summary
An Irreducible Hip Dislocation with Femoral Head Fracture
Tae-Seong Kim, Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon Park
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(3):181-188.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.026
  • 7,172 View
  • 125 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Urgent reduction is required in cases of traumatic hip dislocation to reduce the risk of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. However, in cases of femoral head fractures, the dislocated hip cannot be reduced easily, and in some cases, it can even be irreducible. This irreducibility may provoke further incidental iatrogenic fractures of the femoral neck. In an irreducible hip dislocation, without further attempting for closed reduction, an immediate open reduction is recommended. This can prevent iatrogenic femoral neck fracture or avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and save the natural hip joint.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and efficacy of surgical hip dislocation in managing femoral head fractures: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ahmed A Khalifa, Mohamed A Haridy, Ali Fergany
    World Journal of Orthopedics.2021; 12(8): 604.     CrossRef
Calcaneal Fractures: A Soft Tissue Emergency
Tae-Seong Kim, Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyung-Hyun Park
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(2):112-116.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.2.112
  • 8,585 View
  • 96 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Calcaneal fractures are quite often seen in patients with axial loading injury. In the tongue-type of calcaneusal fractures or tuberosity avulsion fractures, bone fragments are often superiorly and posteriorly displaced, because of the insertion of the Achilles tendon and pull of the gastroc-soleus complex. The Ddisplaced bone fragment compresses the soft tissues, leading tothat makes skin necrosis. To prevent further soft tissue injury, early recognition of the injury by the emergency physician and immediate orthopedic consultation is needed.

Summary
Bone Transport over the Plate for the Segmental Bone Defect of Tibia
Il Seo, Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyeong-Hyun Park
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(2):107-111.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.2.107
  • 5,037 View
  • 103 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Segmental bone defects of the tibia present a challenging problem for the orthopedic trauma surgeon. These injuries are often complicated by soft tissue defects and infection. Many techniques are reported, from bone graft to bone transport. To our knowledge, bone transport over the plate in the distraction site has not been described for the treatment of tibial bone defect. We report an instance including procedure and subsequent complications after bone transport over the plate, to restore a tibial bone defect.

Summary
Pulmonary Thromboembolism during Acetabular Fracture Operation
Il Seo, Chang-Wug Oh, Joon-Woo Kim, Kyeong-Hyun Park
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(2):72-75.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.31.2.72
  • 4,049 View
  • 81 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Acetabular and Pelvic ring fractures are major high-energy trauma injuries and are often combined with other injuries. In particular, cause of long duration of immobilization and combined injuries, venous thromboembolism is a common complication in trauma patients with pelvic or acetabular fractures. We report a case of a fatal pulmonary thromboembolism during the acetabulum fracture operation in a 62-year-old male patient.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury