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Young Woo Kim 2 Articles
Conversion to Internal Fixation after Temporary External Fixation for Femoral Shaft Fractures in Polytrauma Patients
Suk Kyu Choo, Kyung Woon Kang, Young Woo Kim, Hyoung Keun Oh
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):151-157.
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  • 19 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
We report the surgical outcomes for femoral shaft fractures in polytrauma patients who were temporarily treated with external fixation and subsequently converted to internal fixation.
METHODS
From August 2008 to April 2012, we enrolled 13 patients with multiple traumas due to high-energy injuries and concurrent femoral shaft fractures in which temporary external fixation was carried out. The mean age was 39 years, with a range from 18 to 55 years. Ten were men and 3 were women. According to the AO/OTA classification of fractures, type A was found in 5 patients, type B in 6, and type C in 2, with open fractures being found in 6 patients and femoral artery rupture occurring in 2. For internal fixation, intramedullary nailing was performed in 7 patients, and minimally-invasive fixation of locking compression plates was used in 6.
RESULTS
Of the 7 patients converted to intramedullary nailing, 1 experienced delayed union. Of the 6 patients treated with minimally-invasive plate fixation, delayed union occurred in 5, and an auto-bone graft was performed within, on average, 8 months (range: 5~10 months), leading to bone union in all cases in the final follow-up. None of the patients experienced infections or complications involving other organs after having been converted to internal fixation. During the mean follow-up of 19 months, patients achieved satisfactory functional outcomes.
CONCLUSION
In polytrauma patients with a femoral shaft fracture who have been treated with temporary external fixation and who may need internal fixation due to the occurrence of delayed union, an appropriate internal fixation method needs to be selected based on the patient's physical status, and the fracture type.
Summary
Anatomic Conformity of New Periarticular Locking Plates for Koreans: A Biomechanical Cadaveric Study
Yong Cheol Yoon, Jong Keon Oh, Young Woo Kim, Hak Jun Kim, Hong Joo Moon, Nam Ryeol Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):163-169.
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This study was conducted to confirm the anatomic conformity of the new periarticular locking plates designed by Zimmer on Korean adult bones and to identify the structures at risk during the application of these implants.
METHODS
The study was performed on the humerus, radius, and tibia of 10 adult cadavers(6 males and 4 females) procured from the cadaveric lab of our hospital. Anteroposterior (AP) and lateral X-rays were taken to confirm that the cadavers were free of any unusual lesions or anatomic variations. We used the 3.5-mm proximal humerus plate, 2.7-mm distal radius plate, 3.5- and 5.0-mm proximal tibia plates, and 3.5-mm distal tibia plate developed by Zimmer, Inc. (Zimmer periarticular locking plate). The longest plate from each group was used to confirm anatomical conformity. Standard approaches were used for each area, and soft tissue was retracted in order to pass the plate beneath the muscle. The position of the plate was confirmed using standard AP and lateral view X-rays. After this procedure had been completed, the region was dissected along the length of the implant to determine the conformity of the implant to bone and the penetrations of screws into the articular surface or violations of any vital structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, or tendons.
RESULTS
Excellent anatomical conformity was observed with Zimmer periarticular locking plates for Korean adults. The tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery were found to be structures at risk when applying a distal tibial plate.
CONCLUSION
Additional posterolateral fixation is recommended when dealing with cases of tibial plateau fracture when the fracture line extends to the posterolateral cortex. We recommend taking proper views using 10~15 degrees of internal rotation to ensure correct screw length and, thus, avoid penetration of vital structures and tendons.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury