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Young Sun Yoo 2 Articles
Extensive Inferior Vena Cava Injury Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report
Young Sun Yoo, Seong Pyo Mun
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):219-223.
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  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic injuries of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are the most challenging lesions in abdominal vascular injuries and are associated with a high mortality rate. Although endovascular treatment has been addressed in the management of vascular trauma, surgery is the mainstay in the treatment for IVC injury as an endovascular technique for the venous system has not been developed. We report a case of successful surgical repair of an extensive IVC laceration following a fall.
Summary
Diversity of the Definition of Stable Vital Sign in Trauma Patients: Results of a Nationwide Survey
Seong Pyo Mun, Young Sun Yoo
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):115-125.
  • 1,117 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Stable vital signs (SVSs) are thought to be the most important criteria for successful non-operative management (NOM) of blunt spleen injury (BSI). However, a consistent definition of SVSs has been lacking. We wanted to evaluate the diversity of the definitions of SVSs by using a nationwide survey.
METHODS
A questionnaire regarding the definition of SVSs was sent to the trauma surgeons working at the Department of Trauma Surgery and Emergency Medicine at a level-I trauma center between October 2011 and November 2011. Data were compared using analyses of the variance, t-tests, chi2 tests and logistic regressions.
RESULTS
Among 201 surgeons, 198 responded (98.2%). Of these 198 responses, 45 were incomplete, so only 153 (76.1%) were analyzed. In defining the SVSs, significant diversity existed on the subjects of type of blood pressure (BP), cut-off value for hypotension, technique for measuring BP, duration of hypotension, whether or not to use the heart rate (HR) as a determinant, cut-off value of hypotension when the patient had a comorbidity or when the patient was a child. Of the 153 surgeons whose responses were analyzed, 91.5% replied that they were confused when defining SVSs.
CONCLUSION
Confusion exists regarding how to define SVSs. Most surveyed surgeons felt that a need existed to clarify both the definition of SVSs and the use of SVSs to determine hemodynamic stability for NOM.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury