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Young Jin Cheon 3 Articles
Comparison Prehospital RTS (Revised trauma score) with Hospital RTS in Trauma Severity Assessment
Seung Yeop Lee, Young Jin Cheon, Chul Han
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):177-181.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.177
  • 2,309 View
  • 25 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Assessment of the trauma severity associated with the prognosis of trauma patients. But we are having a lot of difficulties in assess the severity because of scarcity of current first-aid records resources.
METHODS
We presumed that Applying the Revised trauma score which consist of vital signs and GCS score will be helpful to assess the sevirity.This study covers the 10069 patient of Ewah womans hospital (2011.1.1.-2014.12.31) who are able to verify the GCS score from fist-aid records.
RESULTS
There is no distinctions between prehospital RTS and hospital RTS. And shows high level of correlation between prehospital RTS and ISS.
CONCLUSION
Therefore we conclude that checking the GCS and RTS at prehospital state will be help to assess the severity of trauma patients.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparative Evaluation of Emergency Medical Service Trauma Patient Transportation Patterns Before and After Level 1 Regional Trauma Center Establishment: A Retrospective Single-Center Study
    Hyeong Seok Lee, Won Young Sung, Jang Young Lee, Won Suk Lee, Sang Won Seo
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2021; 34(2): 87.     CrossRef
  • Real-Time Monitoring Electronic Triage Tag System for Improving Survival Rate in Disaster-Induced Mass Casualty Incidents
    Ju Young Park
    Healthcare.2021; 9(7): 877.     CrossRef
Complications of a Tube Thoracostomy Performed by Emergency Medicine Residents
Dai Yun Cho, Dong Suep Sohn, Young Jin Cheon, Kihun Hong
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(2):37-43.
  • 1,111 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
A tube thoracostomy is an invasive procedure that places patients at risk for complications. Tube thoracostomies are frequently performed by emergency medicine residents. Thus, the purpose of the study was to assess both the complication rate for tube thoracostomies performed by emergency medicine residents and the factors associated with these complications.
METHODS
A retrospective chart review of all patients who had undergone a tube thoracostomy performed by emergency medicine residents between January 2008 and February 2009 was conducted at a university hospital. Complications were divided into major and minor complications and into immediate and delayed complications. Complications requiring corrective surgical intervention, requiring the administration of blood products, or involving situations requiring intravenous antibiotics were defined as major. Complications that were detected within 2 hours were defined as immediate.
RESULTS
Tube thoracostomies were performed in 189 patients, and 70 patients(37%) experienced some complications. Most complications were immediate and minor. In multiple logistic regressions, BMI, hypotension and resident seniority were significantly associated with complications.
CONCLUSION
The prevalence of complications was similar to these in previous reports on the complications of a tube thoracostomy. Most complications from tube thoracostomies performed by emergency medicine residents were immediate and minor complications. Thus, emergency medicine residents should be allowed to perform closed tube thoracostomies instead of thoracic surgeons.
Summary
Rational Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Traumatic Simple Wounds
Jae Eun Kim, Joo Hyun Suh, Yoon Hee Choi, Hyun A Bae, Jin Hee Jung, Eun Kyung Eo, Young Jin Cheon, Koo Young Jung
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(1):40-46.
  • 1,020 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The primary goal of wound management is to avoid infection. Wounds in all patients presenting to the Emergency Department are contaminated with bacteria. Despite this, there is a low incidence of infection. Unfortunately, physicians continue to use antimicrobial agents indiscriminately. The authors intended to determine the effect of selective antimicrobial agents and the indications for appropriate antimicrobial agent use in traumatic simple wounds.
METHODS
This prospective study was performed from Jul. 2005 to Aug. 2005. A pilot study had been performed from Nov. 2003 to Jul. 2004 at the Ewha Woman's University Mokdong Hospital. Structured data sheets were completed at the times of the patient's visits to the Emergency Department and to the Outpatient Department for follow-up. Infection was determined at the time of follow-up. The indications of antimicrobial agent use are immunocompromised patients, wounds contaminated for 3 hours or longer, devitalized tissue, and extremity wounds except hand wounds caused by sharp objects.
RESULTS
The study enrolled 216 injured patients. The general characteristics of patients and wounds between the two groups were not significantly different. The antimicrobial agent use and infection rate of the pilot study were 227 cases (90.4%) and 10 cases (4.0%), and those of this study were 100 cases (46.3%) and 9 cases (4.1%). In this study, antibiotic use was reduced to almost half compared with the previous study, but the infection rate was similar (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION
Rational use of antimicrobial agents in simple wounds reduced the use of antimicrobial agents in the Emergency Department without increasing the infection rate.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury