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Yong Sung Cha 2 Articles
Clinical Characteristics and Prognostic Factors of Geriatric Patients Involved in Traffic Accidents
Tae Su Kim, Kang Hyun Lee, Tae Hoon Kim, O Hyun Kim, Yong Sung Cha, Kyung Chul Cha, Sung Oh Hwang
J Trauma Inj. 2014;27(4):101-107.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Recently, the population of elderly people has been increasing rapidly all over the world. The social activities of the aging population have increased, which has also increased the number of elderly patients injured in traffic accidents. Thus, we analyzed the characteristics of elderly patients involved in traffic accidents.
METHODS
This study was conducted retrospectively from July 2008 to March 2009 among trauma patients involved in traffic accidents who visited Wonju Severance Christian Hospital. Patients under 18 years of age and pregnant patients were excluded. We divided the patients in two groups, a geriatrics group and an adult group on the basis of an age of 65. We compared the types of traffic accidents, the locations of the accidents, the behaviors of the patients at the times of the accidents, the use of seat-belts, and alcohol consumption between the two groups. We calculated the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) for each group.
RESULTS
Total number of the included patients was 903, and the number of elderly patients was 181 (mean age: 71.7+/-4.9 years old). There were no significant differences in the initial vital signs, GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale), and RTS between the two groups. There were differences in the types and the locations of the crashes, the behaviors of the patients at the times of the accidents, the use of seat belts, and alcohol consumption between the two groups (p<0.05). The average ISS of the geriatric group was higher than that of the adult group (9.66+/-10.11 vs. 6.59+/-8.99, p=0.004). The mortality was higher in the geriatric group (n=17,9%) than in the adult group (n=23,2%) (p=0.004).
CONCLUSION
The numbers of mortalities and surgical procedures were greater within the elderly group than the adult group. The average ISS was higher in the geriatric group than in the adult group. The severity of injuries due to traffic accidents was higher in the geriatric group than it was in the adult group.
Summary
The Characteristics of Spinal Injury in Skiing and Snowboarding Injuries
Yong Sung Cha, Kang Hyun Lee, Sun Hyu Kim, Yong Su Jang, Hyun Kim, Tae Yong Shin, Sung Oh Hwang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(1):33-39.
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Few studies have been done for spinal injuries after skiing and snowboarding accidents. Assuming that the riding patterns of skiing and snowboarding were different, we analyzed the differences between the mechanisms, diagnoses and levels of spinal injuries caused by them. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of spinal hazards associated with skiing and snowboarding in order to educate skiers and snowboarders.
METHODS
We conducted a prospective study of 96 patients who had sustained spinal injuries as a result of skiing and snowboarding accidents from January 2003 to March 2006. We used a questionnaire, radiological studies, history taking, and physical examinations. We analyzed the mechanism of injury, the level of spinal injury, the severity of spinal injury, and the Abbreviated Injury Scale scores (AIS score). We used the t-test and the chi-square test.
RESULTS
The skiing and the snowboarding injury group included in 96 patients. The skiing injury group included 30 patients (31.2%), and the snowboarding injury group included the remaining 66 patients (69.8%). The primary mechanism of injury in skiing was collisions and in snowboarding was slip downs (p=0.508). The primary level of spinal injury in skiing and snowboarding was at the L-spine level (p=0.547). The most common athlete ability of the injured person was at the intermediate level (p=0.954). The injured were most commonly at the beginner or the intermediate level (p=0.302). The primary diagnosis of spinal injury in skiing and snowboarding was back spain (p=0.686). The AIS scores did not differed between the two groups (p=0.986).
CONCLUSION
The most common spinal injury after skiing and snowboarding accidents was back sprain. There was no difference in the severity of spinal injury between skiing and snowboarding accidents.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury