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Won Young Kim 3 Articles
A Pilot Study on Environmental Factors Contributing to Childhood Home Slip-Down Injuries
Jeong Min Ryu, Min Hoo Seo, Won Young Kim, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(1):51-56.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The purpose of this study was to investigate environmental factors contributing to childhood home slip-down injuries.
METHODS
Among a total of 2,812 injured children in our Customer Injury Surveillance System (CISS), we performed a prospective study on 262 children with home slip-down injuries who visited the pediatric emergency department of Asan Medical Center between March 2008 and February 2009. We made a frequency analysis on parameters such as activities just before the accident, the presence of any obstacles or lubricant materials, specific home place in the home where the injuries occurred, flooring materials on which the slipdown happened, additional objects hit after slip down, the site and kind of injury, the duration of therapy, and the disposition.
RESULTS
Walking was the most common activity just before the injury. Because rooms and bathrooms were most common places in the home for slip down injuries, laminated papers/ vinyl floor coverings and tiles were the most common flooring materials used in the places where the injuries occured. Most commonly, no obstacles caused the children to slip down, but the furniture, stairs, doorsills, wetness, or soapy fluid followed after that. Over half of the children who slipped (58%) also collided with other than the floor itself after the slipdown, most common objects hit were the edges of the furniture, and doorsills, followed by stairways. The head and neck were the most commonly injured sites, and a laceration was the most common kind of injury. Most children needed less than 1 week of therapy, only 4 children (1.53%) admitted. There were no mortalities.
CONCLUSION
The environmental factors contributing to slip-down injuries were the bathroom, laminated papers/vinyl floors, the furniture, stairs, doorsills, and wetness or soapy fluid. Especially, the furniture, stairs, and doorsills can be both primary obstacles and secondary collision objects. For the safety of our children, we must consider these factors on housing, when decorating or remodeling our house.
Summary
The Causes of Blow-out Fracture in Old Age Patients and Their Computed Tomography Findings and Associated Facial Bone Fracture
Dong Woo Seo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Sang Ku Jung, Shin Ahn, Won Young Kim, Won Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(1):44-50.
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  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes of blow-out fractures, the computed tomography findings, and the associated facial bone fractures in aged patients.
METHODS
This study was performed by conducting a chart review. From January 2004 to December 2007, the patients who visited the emergency room of Asan Medical Center and were diagnosed as having a blow-out fracture were included in the study population. Patients 60 years of age or older were grouped as the aged group while patients younger than 60 years of age were grouped as the control group.
RESULTS
Between the aged group and the control group, there was a difference in the causes of blow-out fractures. The most common cause of blow-out fracture was a slip down in the aged group and violence in the control group (p<0.05). There were no differences in associated symptoms. Extraocular muscle herniation was the only statistically different computed tomography findings. In associated facial bone fractures, the most common fractures were the zygoma in the aged group and the nasal bone in the control group (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION
In patients 60 years of age or older, the most common cause of blow-out fracture was a slip down, and the most common associated facial bone fracture was a zygomatic fracture.
Summary
Epidemiological Multi-center Study of Blast Injury in Military Centers
Won Young Kim, Wook Jin Choi, Jong Ho Lee, Ha Young Park, Dong Ook Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2008;21(2):78-84.
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  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Recently, the incidence of blast injury has been on the increase worldwide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and analyze blast injuries in South Korea.
METHODS
This was a retrospective multi-center study of blast injuries in three tertiary military centers. The medical records of patients with blast injuries from January 2003 to December 2007 were reviewed. The injury severity was evaluated according to the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), and the Trauma Score and the Injury Severity Score (TRISS).
RESULTS
This study revealed epidemiological data of blast injury in the three tertiary military hospital. A total of 94 cases of blast injury had occurred. Various body regions were involved. The most frequently injured site was the upper extremity (52.1%). The mechanisms for the blast injuries were primary (41.5%), secondary (74.5%), tertiary (7.4%), and quaternary (29.8%). The mean injury-to-hospital arrival time was 3.2+/-1.7 hour. The rate of admission was 88.3%, and the rate of ICU admission was 32.5%. Thirty-six (36) cases required an emergency operation. Most were performed by an Orthopedist (55.6%), an Ophthalmologist (19.4%), or a general surgeon (13.9%). The mortality rate from blast injury was 4.3%.
CONCLUSION
This was the first paper to present data on the type of injury, the site of injury, the cause of death, and the mortality from blast injury in South Korea. Chest injury, brain injury, tertiary injury mechanisms, ISS> or = 16, and a Maximal Abbreviated Injury Scale Score (ABI)> or =4 were significantly associated with death.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury