Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Author index
Search
Won Kim 4 Articles
A Pilot Study on Environmental Factors Contributing to Childhood Home Slip-Down Injuries
Jeong Min Ryu, Min Hoo Seo, Won Young Kim, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(1):51-56.
  • 2,920 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The purpose of this study was to investigate environmental factors contributing to childhood home slip-down injuries.
METHODS
Among a total of 2,812 injured children in our Customer Injury Surveillance System (CISS), we performed a prospective study on 262 children with home slip-down injuries who visited the pediatric emergency department of Asan Medical Center between March 2008 and February 2009. We made a frequency analysis on parameters such as activities just before the accident, the presence of any obstacles or lubricant materials, specific home place in the home where the injuries occurred, flooring materials on which the slipdown happened, additional objects hit after slip down, the site and kind of injury, the duration of therapy, and the disposition.
RESULTS
Walking was the most common activity just before the injury. Because rooms and bathrooms were most common places in the home for slip down injuries, laminated papers/ vinyl floor coverings and tiles were the most common flooring materials used in the places where the injuries occured. Most commonly, no obstacles caused the children to slip down, but the furniture, stairs, doorsills, wetness, or soapy fluid followed after that. Over half of the children who slipped (58%) also collided with other than the floor itself after the slipdown, most common objects hit were the edges of the furniture, and doorsills, followed by stairways. The head and neck were the most commonly injured sites, and a laceration was the most common kind of injury. Most children needed less than 1 week of therapy, only 4 children (1.53%) admitted. There were no mortalities.
CONCLUSION
The environmental factors contributing to slip-down injuries were the bathroom, laminated papers/vinyl floors, the furniture, stairs, doorsills, and wetness or soapy fluid. Especially, the furniture, stairs, and doorsills can be both primary obstacles and secondary collision objects. For the safety of our children, we must consider these factors on housing, when decorating or remodeling our house.
Summary
The Causes of Blow-out Fracture in Old Age Patients and Their Computed Tomography Findings and Associated Facial Bone Fracture
Dong Woo Seo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Sang Ku Jung, Shin Ahn, Won Young Kim, Won Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(1):44-50.
  • 1,111 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes of blow-out fractures, the computed tomography findings, and the associated facial bone fractures in aged patients.
METHODS
This study was performed by conducting a chart review. From January 2004 to December 2007, the patients who visited the emergency room of Asan Medical Center and were diagnosed as having a blow-out fracture were included in the study population. Patients 60 years of age or older were grouped as the aged group while patients younger than 60 years of age were grouped as the control group.
RESULTS
Between the aged group and the control group, there was a difference in the causes of blow-out fractures. The most common cause of blow-out fracture was a slip down in the aged group and violence in the control group (p<0.05). There were no differences in associated symptoms. Extraocular muscle herniation was the only statistically different computed tomography findings. In associated facial bone fractures, the most common fractures were the zygoma in the aged group and the nasal bone in the control group (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION
In patients 60 years of age or older, the most common cause of blow-out fracture was a slip down, and the most common associated facial bone fracture was a zygomatic fracture.
Summary
Comparison of Clinical and Anatomical Differences of Vertebral Artery Dissection between Minor Trauma and Non-trauma Causes
Yeon Hee Chong, Ji Yun Ahn, Bum Jin Oh, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(2):101-105.
  • 1,096 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This study aimed to find any difference in the clinical or the anatomical findings of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) between the trauma and the non-trauma groups.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and radiologic images of VAD patients. We compared data on symptoms, neurologic deficit, National institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) at admission, Rankin score (RS) at admission and discharge, and radiological findings including anatomical features, between the trauma and the non-trauma groups.
RESULTS
From January 1997 to May 2006, 42 patients were enrolled and 13 patients (31%) had a history of earlier trauma. Focal neurologic deficit (trauma group 11/13 vs. non-trauma group 11/29), cerebral stroke (10/13 vs. 9/29), and extradural lesions of dissection (6/13 vs. 3/28) were more common in the trauma group than non-trauma group (p=0.007, p=0.017, p=0.018, respectively) and NIHSS at admission and discharge were significantly higher (p=0.012, p=0.001, respectively). Dissecting aneurysms were less frequent in the trauma group (2/13 vs. 19/29, p=0.006). Subarachnoid hemorrhage and unfavorable prognostic value (Rankin score at discharge> or =2) showed no differences between the groups (p=0.540, p=0.267, respectively).
CONCLUSION
In VAD patients after trauma, focal neurologic deficit due to ischemic stroke and a steno-occlusive pattern are more frequent than they are in non-trauma patients. The location of dissection was most frequent at the extradural vertebral artery in the trauma group. NIHSS was higher in the trauma groups but the incidence of an unfavorable prognostic value (RS> or =2) was not significantly different between the groups.
Summary
A Case of Tension Viscerothorax: A Rare Complication of Diaphragmatic Rupture after Blunt Abdominal Trauma
Maeng Real Park, Jae Ho Lee, Ji Yoon Ahn, Bum Jin Oh, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):201-205.
  • 1,054 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tension viscerothorax (gastrothorax) is rare life-threatening disease which is caused by air trapped in viscera. A distended viscera in the hemi-thorax shifts the mediastinal structures and causes extra-cardiac obstructive shock. A defective diaphragm is caused by abdominal trauma or a congenital anomaly. Traumatic diaphragmatic injury can be missed until herniation develops several years after blunt trauma. In our case, a 10-year old boy developed hemodynamic compromise in the emergency department. Three years earlier, he had suffered blunt abdominal trauma during a pedestrian traffic accident, but there was no evidence of diaphragmatic injury at that time. He was successfully resuscitated by gastric decompression and an emergent thoracic operation. The operation finding revealed a traumatic diaphragmatic injury. Tension viscerothorax is a rare, but catastrophic, condition, so we suggest that addition of tension viscerothorax to the Advanced Trauma and Life Support (ATLS) guidelines may be helpful.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury