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Sung Hwa Paeng 4 Articles
Esophageal Fistula Related to Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery after Severe Cervical Trauma
Sung Hwa Paeng
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):278-282.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
An esophageal perforation following anterior cervical fusion is rare. Early development of an esophageal perforation after anterior cervical fusion is usually due to iatrogenic injury from retraction, injury associated with the original traumatic incident, improperly placed instruments or a bone graft. A 31-year-old man had a cervical dislocation and spinal cord injury because of severe cervical trauma after a traffic accident. He was quadriplegic and had no feeling below T4 dermatome. Anterior decompression of the cervical spine and anterior fusion with mesh with autobone were performed. An esophagocutaneous fistula occurred 7 days after anterior cervical surgery. A second anterior surgery was done because of pus drainage. The mesh was changed with an iliac bone graft, and the esophagocutaneous fistula site was primary repaired, but pus continued to drain. Conservative treatment, which consisted of wound drainage and intravenous administration of antibiotics, was tried, but was unsuccessful. After all, we removed the plate and screws, but did not removed the iliac bone graft, We closed the esophageal fistula, and transposed the sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to the interspace between the esophagus and the cervical spine. The wound to the esophagus was well repaired. In conclusion, precautionary measures are needed to avoid the complication, and adequate treatment is necessary to resolve those complications when they occur.
Summary
Acute Traumatic intracranial Epidural Hematoma in a 4-month-old Infant after a Fall down: A Case Report
Sung Hwa Paeng
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):275-277.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
An eipdural hematoma in an infant is a very rare entity. We report a case of an acute traumatic intracranial epidural hematoma that developed with a lucid interval in a 4-month-old infant after a fall down from a bed. The infant was admitted at the emergency room. The child had initially cried and may have had a decreased level of consciouseness due to brain injury, but then returned to normal level of consciousness for several hours prior to admission. However, the infant had vomited twice after taking milk and then was lethargic. The brain CT revealed a lentiform-shaped huge hematoma on the right parietal area with a midline shift of 8 mm. An osteoplastic craniotomy was performed, and the intracranial epidural hematoma was totally removed. Postoperatively, the infant recovered well and was dischaged.
Summary
A Gunshot Wounds to the Cervical Spine and the Cervical Spinal Cord: A Case Report
Sung Hwa Paeng
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(2):57-62.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Gunshot wounds are rare in Korea, but they have tended to increase recently. We experienced an interesting case of penetrating gunshot injuries to the cervical spine with migration the fragments of the bullet within the dural sac of the cervical spine,so discuss the pathomechanics, treatment and complications of gunshot wounds to the spine and present a review of the literature. A 38-year-old man who had tried to commit suicide with a gun was admitted to our hospital with a penetrating injury to the anterior neck. the patient had quadriplegia. A Computed tomography (CT) scan and 3-dimensional CT of the spine showed destruction of the left lateral mass and lamina of the 5th cervical vertebra; the bullet and fragments were found at the level of the 5th cervical vertebra. The posterior approach was done. A total laminectomy and removal of the lateral mass of the 5th cervical vertebrae were performed, and bone fragments and pellets were removed from the spinal canal, but an intradurally retained pellets were not totally removed. A dural laceration was noted intraoperatively, and CSF leakage was observed, so dura repair was done watertightly with prolene 6-0. The dura repair site was covered with fibrin glue and Tachocomb(R) Immediately, a lumbar drain was done. Radiographs included a postoperative CT scan and X-rays. The postoperative neurological status of the patient was improved compared with the preoperative neurological status. however, the patients developed symptoms of menigitis. He received lumbar drainage(200~250 cc/day) and ventilator care. After two weeks, panperitonitis due to duodenal ulcer perforation was identified. Finally, the patient died because of sepsis.
Summary
Analysis of Surgical Treatment and Factor Related to Closed Reduction Failure for Patients with Traumatically Locked Facets of the Subaxial Cervical Spine
Sung Hwa Paeng
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(1):7-16.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Cervical dislocations with locked facets account for more than 50% of all cervical injuries. Thus, investigating a suitable management of cervical locked facets is important. This study examined factors of close reduction failure in traumatically locked facets of the subaxial cervical spine patients to determine suitable surgical management.
METHODS
We retrospectively analyzed of the case histories of 28 patients with unilateral/bilateral cervical locked facets from Nov. 2004 to Dec. 2010. Based on MRI evaluation of disc status at the injury level, we found unilateral dislocations in 9 cases, and bilateral dislocations in 19 cases, The patients were investigated for neurologic recovery, closed reduction rate, factors of the close reduction barrier, fusion rate and period, spinal alignment, and complications.
RESULTS
The closed reduction failed in 23(82%) patients. Disc herniation was an obstacle to closed reduction (p=0.015) and was more frequent in cases involving a unilateral dislocation (p=0.041). The pedicle or facet fracture was another factor, although some patients showed aggravation of neurologic symptoms, most patients had improved by the last follow up. The kyphotic angle were statistically significant (p=0.043). Sixs patient underwent anterior decompression/fusion, and 15 patients underwent circumferential fusion, and 7 patients underwent posterior fusion. All patients were fused at 3 months after surgery. The complications were 1 case of CSF leakage and 1 case of esphageal fistula, 1 case of infection.
CONCLUSION
We recommend closed reduction be performed as soon as possible after injury to maximize the potential for neurological recovery. Patients fot whom closed reduction of the cervical locked facets have a higher incidence of anatomic obstacles to reduction, including facet fractures and disc herniation. Immediate direct open anterior reduction or circumferential fixation/fusion of locked cervical facets is recommended as a treatment of choice for traumatic locked cervical facet patients after closed reduction failure.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury