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Sung Eun Kim 3 Articles
S-100B in Extracranial Fracture Patients Without Head Trauma
Tae Woong Park, Dong Hoon Lee, Sang Jin Lee, Sung Eun Kim, Chang Woong Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):123-127.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
There is an increasing amount of evidence that S100B could function as a marker of brain damage. However, the cerebral specificity of S100B has been questioned, so the extracerebral sources of S100B have been paid attention. We performed this investigation to show serum S100B levels after extracranial fracture in patients without current head injury and without prior neurological disease.
METHODS
At the emergency department, we obtained the blood samples within 6 hours from trauma patients hospitalized with extracranial fractures. S100B levels were compared between one fracture and more than two fractures, and analyzed according to the presence of soft tissue damage.
RESULTS
Patients with one fracture and those with more than two fractures did not differ by age (mean, 54.70 vs. 47.03, p=0.130), and there was no significant difference in the male-to-female ratio(33:32 vs. 21:12, p=0.226). In patients with one fracture, the mean value of S-100B was 0.56 microgram/L (95% CI: 0.35-0.77) whereas in those with more than two fractures, the corresponding value was 1.09 microgram/L (95% CI: 0.46-1.7, p=0.048). The S100B level of patients with soft tissue damage(1.32+/-0.38) was higher than that of patients without soft tissue damage(0.81+/-0.21), whether one fracture or more than two fractures(p=0.049).
CONCLUSION
We present here that S100B levels were raised in 77% of patients with extracranial fractures without cerebral injury who were hospitalized from the emergency room and that the presence of soft tissue damage contributed to the increased S100B rather than the size of the fractured bone size or the number of fracturest. Thus, this study suggests that soft tissue injury may be considered as an important extracerebral source of S100B.
Summary
A Case of Tricuspid Regurgitation after Blunt Chest Trauma
Gi Hun Choi, Jeong Yeol Seo, Moo Eob Ahn, Hee Cheol Ahn, Sung Eun Kim, Seung Hwan Cheun, Seung Yong Lee, Kwang Min Choi, Hyung Soo Kim, Jae Bong Chung, Jun Hwi Cho, Joong Bum Mun, Chan Woo Park
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):188-191.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Tricuspid regurgitation after blunt chest trauma is rarely seen in the emergency department. A 19-year-old patient visited our emergency department with chest discomfort after collision with his brother while skiing. Recently, Skiing as a winter sports has become popular with the Korean people, so there is an increasing tendency for patients with diverse traumas associated with ski accidents to visit the emergency department. From simple abrasions or contusions to deadly injuries with unstable vital signs, we are seeing many kind of injuries in the emergency department. We present the case report of a patient with tricuspid regurgitation after a blunt chest trauma during the skiing.
Summary
Correlation Between Facial Fracture and Cranial Injury
Seung Won Lee, Suk Jin Cho, Seok Yong Ryu, Sang Lae Lee, Sung Eun Kim, Sung Jun Kim, Ji Young Ahn
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):150-158.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
There are two theories about the relationships between facial fractures and cranial injuries. One is that facial bones act as a protective cushion for the brain, and the other is that facial fractures are the marker for increased risk of cranial injury. They have been debated on for many years. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between facial fractures and cranial injuries.
METHODS
A retrospective study was performed on 242 patients with facial fractures. The data were analyzed based on the medical records of the patients: age, gender, cause of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), alcohol intake, type of facial fractures, and type of cranial injury. The patients were divided into two groups: facial fractures with cranial injury and facial fractures without cranial injury. We compared the general characteristics between the two groups and evaluated the relationship between each type of facial fracture and each type of cranial injury.
RESULTS
Among the 242 patients with facial bone fractures, 96 (39.7%) patients had a combination of facial fractures and cranial injuries. Gender predilection was demonstrated to favor males: the ratio was 3:1. The mean age was 36.51+/-19.63. As to the injury mechanism, traffic accidents (in car, out of car, motorcycle) were statistically significant in the group of facial fractures with cranial injury (p=0.038, p=0.000, p=0.003). The ISS was significant, but alcohol intake was not significant. No significant relationship between facial fractures and skull fractures was found. Only maxilla fractures, zygoma fractures, and cerebral concussion had a significant difference in cranial injury (p=0.039, p=0.025).
CONCLUSION
There is a no correlation between facial fractures and skull fractures, which suggests that the cushion effect is the predominent relationship between facial fractures and cranial injuries.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury