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Sung Chan Oh 3 Articles
The Utility of Liver Transaminase as a Predictor of Liver Injury in Blunt Abdominal Trauma
Jong Seok Lee, Sung Chan Oh, Hye Jin Kim, Suk Jin Cho, Sang Lae Lee, Seok Yong Ryu
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):151-156.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The liver is the second most common organ injured by blunt abdominal trauma. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of liver transaminase in screening blunt abdominal trauma patients for traumatic liver injury.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 231 patients who sustained blunt trauma and were at risk for traumatic liver injury between June 2009 and August 2010. All of them underwent a focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Based on the diagnosis of abdominal CT, patients were divided into two groups: group I with liver injury and group II without liver injury. We compared the two groups and calculated the sensitivity, the specificity and the predictive values of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) by using multiple cutoff values.
RESULTS
Of 231 patients with no abdominal free fluid in the FAST, 33 had traumatic liver injury on abdominal CT. The mean AST and ALT levels in group I (311.6 IU/L and 228.1 IU/L, respectively) were significantly higher than the values in group II (48.4 IU/L and 35.6 IU/L, respectively). The cutoff to distinguish liver injury is 60 IU/L for AST and 58 IU/L for ALT, with 93.8% sensitivity and 79.8% specificity for AST, and 90.6% sensitivity and 87.4% specificity for ALT.
CONCLUSION
We recommend that all patient with suspected blunt abdominal trauma be evaluated using serum liver transaminase as a screening test for liver injury even though no abdominal free fluid is shown on the FAST. If AST > 60 IU/L and/or ALT > 58 IU/L, abdominal CT was useful to confirm liver injury in this study
Summary
Indications for Computed Tomography (CT) to Detect Renal Injury in Pediatric Blunt Abdominal Trauma Patients with Microscopic Hematuria
Cheolgon Go, Hye Jin Kim, Sukjin Cho, Sung Chan Oh, Sang Lae Lee, Seok Yong Ryu
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(1):29-37.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Controversy exists regarding whether pediatric blunt abdominal trauma patients with microscopic hematuria should undergo radiographic evaluation. Adult patients have indications such as shock and deceleration injury. This study was conducted to suggest indications for the use of CT to detect significant renal injury in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma patients with microscopic hematuria.
METHODS
From January 2005 to December 2009, patients less than 18 years of age with blunt abdominal trauma and microscopic hematuria who had undergone CT were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the correlation between microscopic hematuria, shock, deceleration injury, and American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) renal injury grade. Patients were divided into two groups: the insignificant renal injury group (AAST grade 1) and the significant renal injury group (AAST grades 2-5). We compared age, gender, mechanism of injury, degree of microscopic hematuria, evidence of shock, presence of deceleration injury, and associated injuries between the two groups. We analyzed the effect of each of the above each factors on renal injury by using a logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS
Forty-three children were included, and the median age was 15 years. Five children had a significant renal injury. No significant differences, except age and microscopic hematuria (more than 30 red blood cells per high power field (RBC/HPF), p = 0.005) existed between the insignificant and the significant injury groups. A positive correlation existed between renal injury and microscopic hematuria (rho = 0.406, p = 0.007), but renal injury was not correlated with shock and deceleration injury. In the multivariate regression analysis, microscopic hematuria was the only factor correlated with renal injury (p = 0.042).
CONCLUSION
If a microscopic hematuria of more than 30 RBC/HPF exists, the use of CT should be considerd, regardless of shock and deceleration injury to detect significant renal injury in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma patients.
Summary
Is There a Need for Conventional Spine Radiographs Following a Negative Chest and Abdominal CT in Trauma Patients?
Sung Chan Oh
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(1):24-28.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This was conducted to assess the need for conventional radiographs of the thoracolumbar spine for routine screening of trauma patients who revealed no spinal trauma on chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT).
METHODS
We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of trauma patients who underwent conventional radiographs of the thoracolumbar spine following a chest and abdominal CT that revealed no spinal trauma.
RESULTS
Two hundred seventy-five trauma patients underwent conventional radiographs of the thoracolumbar spine following a chest and abdominal CT that revealed no spinal trauma. In 274 of the cases, the thoracolumbar spine series was also negative.
CONCLUSION
CT of the chest and abdomen is an adequate evaluation of the thoracolumbar spine in trauma patients who require routine thoracolumbar spine screening, making subsequent conventional radiographs of the thoracolumbar spine unnecessary.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury