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Soo Eon Lee 3 Articles
Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury
Soo Eon Lee, Chun Kee Chung, Tae Ahn Jahng, Chi Heon Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):151-156.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Traumatic cervical SCI is frequently accompanied by dural tear and the resulting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after surgery can be troublesome and delay rehabilitation with increasing morbidity. This study evaluated the incidence of intraoperative CSF leaks in patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) who underwent anterior cervical surgery and described the reliable management of CSF leaks during the perioperative period.
METHODS
A retrospective study of medical records and radiological images was done on patients with CSF leaks after cervical spine trauma.
RESULTS
Seven patients(13.2%) were identified with CSF leaks during the intraoperative period. All patients were severely injured and showed structural abnormalities on the initial magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the cervical spine. Intraoperatively, no primary repair of dural tear was attempted because of a wide, rough defect size. Therefore, fibrin glue was applied to the operated site in all cases. Although a wound drainage was inserted, it was stopped within the first 24 hours after the operation. No lumbar drainage was performed. Postoperatively, the patients should kept their heads in an elevated position and early ambulation and rehabilitation were encouraged. None of the patients developed complications related to CSF leaks during admission.
CONCLUSION
The incidence of CSF leaks after surgery for cervical spinal trauma is relatively higher than that of cervical spinal stenosis. Therefore, one should expect the possibility of a dural tear and have a simple and effective management protocol for CSF leaks in trauma cases established.
Summary
Analysis of the Prognostic Factors in Trauma Patients with Massive Bleeding
Seok Ho Choi, Gil Joon Suh, Yeong Cheol Kim, Woon Yong Kwon, Kook Nam Han, Kyoung Hak Lee, Soo Eon Lee, Seung Je Go
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):247-253.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Hemorrhage is a main cause of death in trauma patients. The goal of this study is to describe the characteristics of trauma patients with massive bleeding and to evaluate the prognostic factors concerning their survival.
METHODS
This study was performed retrospectively and included trauma patients with massive bleeding who had been treated from March 2007 to August 2012. The inclusion criterion was patients who received more than 10 U of packed red blood cells within the first 24 hours after visiting the emergency department. Based on their medical records, we collected data in terms of demographic findings, mechanisms of injury, initial clinical and laboratory findings, methods for hemostasis (emergency surgery and/or angioembolization), transfusion, injury severity score (ISS), revised trauma score (RTS) and trauma and injury severity score (TRISS). We used the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test to compare the variables between the patients that survived and those that did not. We performed a logistic regression analysis with the significant variables from the univariate test.
RESULTS
Thirty-two(32) patients were enrolled. The main mechanisms of injury were falls and motor vehicle accidents. The mean transfusion amount of packed red blood cells (PRBC) was 17.4 U. The mean elapsed time for the first hemostasis (surgery or embolization) was 3.5 hours. The initial technical success rates were 83.3%(15/18) in angioembolization and 66.7%(8/12) in surgery. The overall mortality rate was 34.4%(11/32). The causes of death were bleeding, brain swelling and multiple organ failure. The ISS(25.5 vs 46.3, p=0.000), TRISS(73.6 vs 45.1, p=0.034) and base excess(<-12 mmol/L, p=0.020) were significantly different between the patients who survived and those who did not.
CONCLUSION
The ISS was a prognostic factor for trauma patients with massive bleeding.
Summary
Evaluation of Lung Injury Score as a Prognostic Factor of Critical Care Management in Multiple Trauma Patients with Chest Injury
Kook Nam Han, Seok Ho Choi, Yeong Cheol Kim, Kyoung Hak Lee, Soo Eon Lee, Ki Young Jeong, Gil Joon Suh
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):105-110.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Chest injuries in multiple trauma patients are major predisposing factor for increased length of stay in intensive care unit, prolonged mechanical ventilator, and respiratory complications such as pneumonia. The aim of this study is the evaluation of lung injury score as a risk factor for prolonged management in intensive care unit (ICU).
METHODS
Between June to August in 2011, 46 patients admitted to shock and trauma center in our hospital and 24 patients had associated chest damage without traumatic brain injury. Retrospectively, we calculated injury severity score (ISS), lung injury score, and the number of fractured ribs and performed nonparametric correlation analysis with length of stay in ICU and mechanical ventilator support.
RESULTS
Calculated lung injury score(<48 hours) was median 1(0-3) and ISS was median 30(8-38) in study population. They had median 2(0-14) fractured ribs. There were 2 bilateral fractures and 2 flail chest. Ventilator support was needed in 11(45.8%) of them for median 39 hours(6-166). The ISS of ventilator support group was median 34(24-34) and lung injury score was median 1.7(1.3-2.5). Tracheostomy was performed in one patient and it was only complicated case and ICU stay days was median 9(4-16). In correlation analysis, Lung injury score and ISS were significant with the length of stay in ICU but the number of fractured ribs and lung injury score were predicting factors for prolonged mechanical ventilator support.
CONCLUSION
Lung injury score could be a possible prognostic factor for the prediction of increased length of stay in ICU and need for mechanical ventilator support.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury