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Moo Eob Ahn 3 Articles
Comparison of Injuries Related with All-Terrian Vehicles (ATVs) and Motorcycles (MCs)
Nam Ho Kim, Myung Deok Kim, Tae Hun Lee, Moo Eob Ahn, Jung Yeol Seo, Jae Sung Lee, Dong Won Kim, Jung Ryul Lee, Sang Heon Park, Yu min Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):128-133.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
All-terrain vehicle (ATV)-related injuries have increased since the introduction of ATVs to Korea. The purpose of this study is to compare patients with ATV-related injuries (PATV) to patients with motorcycle (MC)-related injuries (PMC).
METHODS
We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of PATV and PMC who visited an emergency center in 2008. The cases of PMC were 164, and those of PATV were 52.
RESULTS
While PMC are seen evenly in the first half year and the second half year, PATV are seen mainly the first half year (from March to June: 73%). For PMC the most frequent injury mechanism was collision with another vehicle, while for PATV, it was side overturn/roll over. The injury severity score (ISS), the revised trauma score (RTS), the trauma score and the injury severity score (TRISS) were 5.6+/-5.6, 7.7+/-0.7, 5.0+/-2.1 for PMC and 7.1+/-7.5, 7.7+/-1.1, 5.5+/-1.5 for PATV, respectively. The most common injury sites were the lower extremities for PMC and the face for PATV. The rates of admission, surgery and the length of hospital stay were similar between PMC and PATV.
CONCLUSION
This study shows that the risk of ATV accidents is similar to that of MC accidents. We recommend that the same safety standards and regulations that are applied to MCs should be used for ATVs. Safe and enjoyable paths have to be sought for drivers of ATVs.
Summary
The Clinical Usefulness of Halo Sign on CT Image of Trauma Patients
Seung Yong Lee, You Dong Sohn, Hee Cheol Ahn, Gu Hyun Kang, Jung Tae Choi, Moo Eob Ahn, Jeong Youl Seo
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(2):144-148.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The management of hemorrhagic shock is critical for trauma patients. To assess hemorrhagic shock, the clinician commonly uses a change in positional blood pressure, the shock index, an estimate of the diameter of inferior vena cava based on sonography, and an evaluation of hypoperfusion complex shown on a CT scan. To add the finding for the hypoperfusion complex, the 'halo sign' was introduced recently. To our knowledge, this 'halo sign' has not been evaluated for its clinical usefulness, so we designed this study to evaluate its usefulness and to find the useful CT signs for hypoperfusion complex.
METHODS
The study was done from January 2007 to May 2007. All medical records and CT images of 124 patients with trauma were reviewed, of which 103 patients were included. Exclusion criteria was as follows: 1) age < 15 year old and 2) head trauma score of AIS > or = 5.
RESULTS
The value of kappa, to assess the inter-observer agreement, was 0.51 (p < 0.001). The variables of the halo-sign-positive group were statistically different from those of the halo-sign-negative group. The rate of transfusion for the halo-sign-positive group was about 10 times higher than that of the halo-sign-negative group and the rate of mortality was about 6 times higher.
CONCLUSION
In the setting of trauma, early abdominal CT can show diffuse abnormalities due to hypoperfusion complex. Recognition of these signs is important in order to prevent an unwanted outcome in hemorrhagic shock. We conclude that the halo sign is a useful one for hypoperfusion complex and that it is useful for assessing the degree of hemorrhagic shock.
Summary
A Case of Tricuspid Regurgitation after Blunt Chest Trauma
Gi Hun Choi, Jeong Yeol Seo, Moo Eob Ahn, Hee Cheol Ahn, Sung Eun Kim, Seung Hwan Cheun, Seung Yong Lee, Kwang Min Choi, Hyung Soo Kim, Jae Bong Chung, Jun Hwi Cho, Joong Bum Mun, Chan Woo Park
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):188-191.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Tricuspid regurgitation after blunt chest trauma is rarely seen in the emergency department. A 19-year-old patient visited our emergency department with chest discomfort after collision with his brother while skiing. Recently, Skiing as a winter sports has become popular with the Korean people, so there is an increasing tendency for patients with diverse traumas associated with ski accidents to visit the emergency department. From simple abrasions or contusions to deadly injuries with unstable vital signs, we are seeing many kind of injuries in the emergency department. We present the case report of a patient with tricuspid regurgitation after a blunt chest trauma during the skiing.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury