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Ki Young Jeong 2 Articles
Evaluation of Lung Injury Score as a Prognostic Factor of Critical Care Management in Multiple Trauma Patients with Chest Injury
Kook Nam Han, Seok Ho Choi, Yeong Cheol Kim, Kyoung Hak Lee, Soo Eon Lee, Ki Young Jeong, Gil Joon Suh
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):105-110.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Chest injuries in multiple trauma patients are major predisposing factor for increased length of stay in intensive care unit, prolonged mechanical ventilator, and respiratory complications such as pneumonia. The aim of this study is the evaluation of lung injury score as a risk factor for prolonged management in intensive care unit (ICU).
METHODS
Between June to August in 2011, 46 patients admitted to shock and trauma center in our hospital and 24 patients had associated chest damage without traumatic brain injury. Retrospectively, we calculated injury severity score (ISS), lung injury score, and the number of fractured ribs and performed nonparametric correlation analysis with length of stay in ICU and mechanical ventilator support.
RESULTS
Calculated lung injury score(<48 hours) was median 1(0-3) and ISS was median 30(8-38) in study population. They had median 2(0-14) fractured ribs. There were 2 bilateral fractures and 2 flail chest. Ventilator support was needed in 11(45.8%) of them for median 39 hours(6-166). The ISS of ventilator support group was median 34(24-34) and lung injury score was median 1.7(1.3-2.5). Tracheostomy was performed in one patient and it was only complicated case and ICU stay days was median 9(4-16). In correlation analysis, Lung injury score and ISS were significant with the length of stay in ICU but the number of fractured ribs and lung injury score were predicting factors for prolonged mechanical ventilator support.
CONCLUSION
Lung injury score could be a possible prognostic factor for the prediction of increased length of stay in ICU and need for mechanical ventilator support.
Summary
Management of Severe Trauma Patients in the Emergency Intensive Care Unit
Ji Ju Kim, Gil Joon Suh, Ki Young Jeong, Woon Yong Kwon, Kyung Su Kim, Hui Jai Lee, Yeong Cheol Kim, Seok Ho Choi, Young Ho Lee, Kyung Hag Lee, Kook Nam Han, Hwan Jun Jae, Hyo Cheol Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):98-104.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the trauma care system of our hospital, in which emergency physicians care for major trauma patients in the emergency intensive care unit (ICU) in consultation with intervention radiologists and surgeons.
METHODS
This was a retrospective observational study conducted in an emergency ICU of a tertiary referral hospital. We enrolled consecutive patients who had been admitted to our emergency ICU with major trauma from March 2007 to September 2010. We collected data with respect to demographic findings, mechanisms of injury, the trauma and injury severity score (TRISS), emergency surgery, angiographic intervention, and 6-month mortality. Then, we compared the observed and predicted survivals of the patients. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test and calibration plots by using 10 groups, one for each decile, of predicted mortality were used to evaluate the fitness of TRISS. P-values of greater than 0.05 represent a fair calibration.
RESULTS
Among 116 patients, 12 (10.34%) were dead within 6 months after admission to the ICU, and 29 (25.00%) and 38 (32.80%) patients received emergency surgery and angiographic intervention, respectively. The mean injury severity score and revised trauma score were 36.97+/-17.73 and 7.84+/-6.75, respectively. The observed survival and the predicted survival of the TRISS were 89.66% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.03~95.28%) and 69.85% (95% CI: 63.80~75.91%), respectively. The calibration plots showed that the observed survival of our patients was consistently higher than the predicted survival of the TRISS (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION
The observed survival for the trauma care system of our hospital, in which emergency physicians care for major trauma patients in the emergency ICU in consultation with intervention radiologists and surgeons, was higher than the predicted survival of the TRISS.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury