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J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

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Joon Beom Park 2 Articles
Clinical Analysis of Patients with Abdomen or Neck-penetrating Trauma
Ha Ny Noh, Kwang Min Kim, Joon Beom Park, Hoon Ryu, Keum Seok Bae, Seong Joon Kang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):107-112.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Recently, the change to a more complex social structure has led to an increased frequency of traumas due to violence, accident and so on. In addition, the severity of the traumas and the frequency of penetrating injuries have also increased. Traumas to cervical and abdominal areas, what are commonly seen by general surgeons, can have mild to fatal consequences because in these areas, various organs that are vital to sustaining life are located. The exact location and characteristics of the injury are vital to treating patients with the trauma to these areas. Thus, with this background in mind, we studied, compared, and analyzed clinical manifestations of patients who were admitted to Wonju Christian hospital for penetrating injuries inflicted by themselves or others.
METHODS
We selected and performed a retrospective study of 64 patients who had been admitted to Wonju Christian Hospital from January 2005 to December 2009 and who had cervical or abdominal penetrating injuries clearly inflicted by themselves or others.
RESULTS
There were 51 male (79.7%) and 13 female (20.3%) patients, and the number of male patients was more dominant in this study, having a sex ratio of 3.9 to 1. The range of ages was between 20 and 86 years, and mean age was 43.2 years. There were 5 self-inflicted cervical injuries, and 19 self-inflicted abdominal injuries, making the total number of self-inflicted injury 24. Cervical and abdominal injuries caused by others were found in 11 and 29 patients, respectively. The most common area involved in self-inflicted injuries to the abdomen was the epigastric area, nine cases, and the right-side zone II was the most commonly involved area. On the other hand, in injuries inflicted by others, the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was the most common site of the injury, 14 cases. In the neck, the left-side zone II was the most injured site. In cases of self-inflicted neck injury, jugular vein damage and cervical muscle damage without deep organ injury were observed in two cases each, making them the most common. In cases with abdominal injuries, seven cases had limited abdominal wall injury, making it the most common injury. The most common deep organ injury was small bowel wounds, five cases. In patients with injuries caused by others, six had cervical muscle damage, making it the most common injury found in that area. In the abdomen, small bowel injury was found to be the most common injury, being evidenced in 13 cases. In self-inflicted injuries, a statistical analysis discovered that the total duration of admission and the number of patients admitted to the intensive care unit were significantly shorter and smaller, retrospectively, than in the patient group that had injuries caused by others. No statistically significant difference was found when the injury sequels were compared between the self-inflicted-injury and the injury-inflicted-by-others groups.
CONCLUSION
This study revealed that, in self-inflicted abdominal injuries, injuries limited to the abdominal wall were found to be the most common, and in injuries to the cervical area inflicted by others, injuries restricted to the cervical muscle were found to be the most common. As a whole, the total duration of admission and the ICU admission time were significantly shorter in cases of self-inflicted injury. Especially, in cases of self inflicted injuries, abdominal injuries generally had a limited degree of injury. Thus, in our consideration, accurate injury assessment and an ideal treatment plan are necessary to treat these patients, and minimally invasive equipment, such as laparoscope, should be used. Also, further studies that persistently utilize aggressive surgical observations, such as abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography, for patients with penetrating injuries are needed.
Summary
Traumatic Liver Injury in Pediatric Patients
Byung Han Koo, Joon Beom Park, Keum Seok Bae, Sung Joon Kang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):242-247.
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Trauma is an important cause of death in children. In particular, the liver is the second most commonly organ injured by blunt abdominal trauma. Treatment of patients with liver injury is has changed, and non-operative treatment is the major treatment method at present. In this study, we reviewed traumatic liver injury in pediatric patients.
METHODS
Seventy-seven patients younger than 16 years of age with traumatic liver injury were assessed for 10 years from July 1999 to June 2009 at Wonju Christian hospital. Records of the patients were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic and clinical data were analyzed.
RESULTS
The median age was 6 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 1.2 : 1. The most common injury grade was grade I. The majority of injuries were caused by was traffic accidents, and the second most common cause of injuries was falls. Twenty-four patients had liver injuries alone, and the most common accopaning injury was a lung injury. The average hospital stay was 20.7 days, and the average ICU stay was 4.8 days. Four patients died (5.2%). There were 6 patients with under 10 points on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS). Among these patients, three died. All mortality cases had over 16 points on the Injury Severity Score (ISS). Two patients were treated surgically, one of whom died. Of the 75 patients with non-operative management, three died due to associated injuries.
CONCLUSION
Most pediatric patients with liver injury have good results with non-operative management. Associated injuries and hemodynamic instability are predictive of patient outcome, and those with isolated liver injuries can be successfully managed non-operatively.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury