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Hyung Kee Kim 3 Articles
Forearm Replantation for a Patient Presented with Major Amputation Injury: A Case Report
Jihoon Jang, Kyoung Hoon Lim, Joon Woo Kim, Hyung Kee Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(4):187-190.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.4.187
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AbstractAbstract PDF
With the development of safety measures for employees who work with dangerous machinery, the frequency of amputation injuries has been decreasing with resultant decrease in replantation procedures. However, in some patients with major amputation injury, replantation is still necessary for the preservation of limb and it's function. The replantation of the upper extremity (UE) is a complex and technically demanding surgical procedure. For the successful replantation of UE, the type of injury, reconstruction sequence, ischemic time, and other combined injury of patient should be considered. We report a case of major amputation of UE by guillotine-type injury and discuss the treatment process of this patient.
Summary
Delayed Presentation of a Post-traumatic Mesenteric Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report
Jayun Cho, Heekyung Jung, Hyung Kee Kim, Kyoung Hoon Lim, Jae Min Chun, Seung Huh, Jinyoung Park
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):248-251.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
INTRODUCTION: A post-traumatic mesenteric arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is extremely rare.
CASE
REPORT: A previously healthy 26-year-old male was injured with an abdominal stab wound. Computed tomography (CT) showed liver injury, pancreas injury and a retropancreatic hematoma. We performed the hemostasis of the bleeding due to the liver injury, a distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and evacuation of the retropancreatic hematoma. On the 5th postoperative day, an abdominal bruit and thrill was detected. CT and angiography showed an AVF between the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein with early enhancement of the portal vein (PV). The point of the AVF was about 4 cm from the SMA's orifice. After an emergent laparotomy and inframesocolic approach, the isolation of the SMA was performed by dissection and ligation of adjacent mesenteric tissues which was about 6 cm length from the nearby SMA orifice, preserving the major side branches of the SMA, because the exact point of the AVF could not be identified despite the shunt flow in the PV being audible during an intraoperative hand-held Doppler-shift measurement. After that, the shunt flow could not be detected by using an intraoperative hand-held Doppler-shift measuring device. CT two and a half months later showed no AVF. There were no major complications during a 19-month follow-up period.
CONCLUSION
Early management of a post-traumatic mesenteric AVF is essential to avoid complications such as hemorrhage, congestive heart failure and portal hypertension.
Summary
Treatment of Subclavian Artery Injury in Multiple Trauma Patients by Using an Endovascular Approach: Two Cases
Jayun Cho, Heekyung Jung, Hyung Kee Kim, Kyoung Hoon Lim, Jinyoung Park, Seung Huh
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):243-247.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
INTRODUCTION: Surgical treatment of subclavian artery (SA) injury is challenging because approaching the lesion directly and clamping the proximal artery is difficult. This can be overcome by using an endovascular technique.
CASE
1: A 37-year-old male was drawn into the concrete mixer truck. He had a right SA injury with multiple traumatic injuries: an open fracture of the right leg with posterior tibial artery (PTA) injury, a right hemothorax, and fractures of the clavicle, scapula, ribs, cervical spine and nasal bone. The injury severity score (ISS) was 27. Computed tomography (CT) showed a 30-mm-length thrombotic occlusion in the right SA, which was 15 mm distal to the vertebral artery (VA). A self-expandable stent(8 mmx40 mm in size) was deployed through the right femoral artery while preserving VA flow, and the radial pulse was palpable after deployment. Other operations were performed sequentially. He had a viable right arm during a 13-month follow-up period.
CASE
2: A 25-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a motorcycle accident. The ISS was 34 because of a hemothorax and open fractures of the mandible and the left hand. Intraoperative angiography was done through a right femoral artery puncture. Contrast extravasation of the SA was detected just outside the left rib cage. After balloon catheter had been inflated just proximal to the bleeding site, direct surgical exploration was performed through infraclavicular skin incision. The transected SA was identified, and an interposition graft was performed using a saphenous vein graft. Other operations were performed sequentially. He had a viable left arm during a 15-month follow-up period.
CONCLUSION
The challenge of repairing an SA injury can be overcome by using an endovascular approach.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury