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Hong Kyung Shin 2 Articles
Clinical Analysis of Frostbite
Jang Kyu Choi, Hyun Chul Kim, Hong Kyung Shin
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):158-169.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.158
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Frostbite can affect still soldiers. Initial clinical manifestations are similar for superficial and deep frostbite, so early treatment is identical. It is under-estimated by physicians. We try to identify the challenges of managing these complex tissue injuries.
METHODS
A retrospective analysis of 84 patients hospitalized at AFCH from 2009 to 2015 was conducted. We investigated differences of epidemiological characteristics, identification of soft tissue injury, treatment and complications between superficial (SF: 43; 51.2%) and deep (DF: 41; 48.8%) frostbite.
RESULTS
The major (94.0%) developed frostbite in dry circumstances (89.3%). Wet circumstances (66.7%) were more susceptible to DF rather than dry (46.7%). The 38 (45.2%) arrived to specialist within 7days. Most prone sites were feet, followed by hands. Toes had more deep injuries. DF presented more increased levels of ALT, CPK, CKMB, CRP. The bone scan of W+S+ was 48.3%, 87.1% and W+S- was 20.7%, 12.9%, respectively. The treatment resulted in improved or normalized perfusion scan with matching clinical improvement. It was a good tool to assess treatment response. Eighteen normal and 8 stenotic type of PCR resulted in normal with matching clinical improvement. One continuous obstructive waveform led to minor amputation. Twelve underwent both PCR and MRA. Among 6 normal PCR, 5 showed normal and one stenosis in MRA. All 5 stenosis and one obstruction showed the same findings in MRA. It was a good tool to evaluate vascular compromise. They were treated with rapid rewarming (11.6%, 22.0%), hydrotherapy (16.3%, 29.3%), respectively. Six (14.6%) underwent STSG, 2 (4.9%) had digital amputation in DF. Berasil, Ibuprofen, Trental were commonly administered. PGE1 was administered selectively for 6.8, 10.8 days, respectively. Raynaud's syndrome (16.3%), CRPS (4.7%), LOM (14.6%) and toe deformity (4.9%) were specific sequelae.
CONCLUSION
We should recommend intensive foot care education, early rewarming and evacuation to specialized units. The bone scanning and PCR should allow for a more aggressive and active approach to the management of tissue viability.
Summary
CT Based Hemoperitoneum Scoring for Clinicians: Objectifying the Severity of Splenic Injury and Recovery
Hong Kyung Shin, Ra Yeong Song, Ho Seong Han, Yoo Seok Yoon, Jai Young Cho, Dae Wook Hwang, Kyuwhan Jung, Young Ki Kim, Woo Hyung Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(4):273-278.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
In patients with splenic trauma, Computed Tomography (CT) scan is helpful in selecting treatment options and evaluating resolution after NOM (Non-Operative Management). The purpose of this study was to suggest a CT based hemoperitoneum (HP) scoring system that can easily be used by clinicians to evaluate the severity of injury and recovery.
METHODS
A retrospective review of patients with splenic trauma admitted to our hospital between May 2003 and January 2013 was conducted. Patients diagnosed with isolated spleen injury who had a CT scan on admission were included. 1 or 2 points were given according to location and amount of hematoma in the CT image. Using the existing ultrasonography (US) based HP scoring system, the same method was applied to obtain our CT based HP scoring (CBHS) system, which ranges from 0 to 8 points. The CBHS system can be easily used by clinicians for a quick assessment of splenic injury.
RESULTS
Of the 39 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 6 patients were managed operatively and 33 non-operatively. There was a significant difference in CBHS between the OM (operative management) group and the NOM group.(p=0.03) CBHS showed correlation with Hb (hemoglobin), Hct (hematocrit), spleen injury grade(AAST), and Hounsfield unit of ROI (Region of interest). (p=0.17, p=0.18, p<0.000, p=0.02, respectively) After successful NOM with stabilized Hb level, the amount of hemoperitoneum was scored in the follow-up CT. CBHS demonstrated correlation with decreased spleen injury grade, decreased Hounsfield unit of ROI (Region of interest) (p=0.039, p=0.049, respectively), and also objectively reflected patient recovery.
CONCLUSION
CBHS can be used as an objective and intuitive tool for clinicians in grading the severity of splenic injury by scoring the amount of hemoperitoneum, and in assessing recovery.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury