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Chul Han 3 Articles
Comparison Prehospital RTS (Revised trauma score) with Hospital RTS in Trauma Severity Assessment
Seung Yeop Lee, Young Jin Cheon, Chul Han
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):177-181.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.177
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  • 25 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Assessment of the trauma severity associated with the prognosis of trauma patients. But we are having a lot of difficulties in assess the severity because of scarcity of current first-aid records resources.
METHODS
We presumed that Applying the Revised trauma score which consist of vital signs and GCS score will be helpful to assess the sevirity.This study covers the 10069 patient of Ewah womans hospital (2011.1.1.-2014.12.31) who are able to verify the GCS score from fist-aid records.
RESULTS
There is no distinctions between prehospital RTS and hospital RTS. And shows high level of correlation between prehospital RTS and ISS.
CONCLUSION
Therefore we conclude that checking the GCS and RTS at prehospital state will be help to assess the severity of trauma patients.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparative Evaluation of Emergency Medical Service Trauma Patient Transportation Patterns Before and After Level 1 Regional Trauma Center Establishment: A Retrospective Single-Center Study
    Hyeong Seok Lee, Won Young Sung, Jang Young Lee, Won Suk Lee, Sang Won Seo
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2021; 34(2): 87.     CrossRef
  • Real-Time Monitoring Electronic Triage Tag System for Improving Survival Rate in Disaster-Induced Mass Casualty Incidents
    Ju Young Park
    Healthcare.2021; 9(7): 877.     CrossRef
Predictive Factors for MDCT as a Primary Survey in Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury
Guen E Pak, Chul Han, Young Duck Cho, Jung Youn Kim, Young Hoon Yoon, Sung Woo Lee, Sung Woo Moon, Sung Hyuk Choi
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(1):18-24.
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  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Missing cervical pathology after injury may lead to disability and influence long-term survival. Controversies continue to evolve concerning the initial screening methods used to predict cervical spine injury. Through a retrospective chart review, we attempted to analyze and propose factors predictive of cervical trauma.
METHODS
Of all the patients who had visited the Emergency Department of Korea University, from January 2009 to December 2009, a retrospective review of the clinical records of the 217 patients who had undergone cervical spine computed tomography was done. We investigated whether we could predict the need for cervical spine computed tomography shortly after presentation in trauma patients by comparing the group with fractures and group without fractures and by finding risk factors showing significant differences between the two groups that might be used as guides in decision making.
RESULTS
Of the 217 subjects who underwent cervical spine computed tomography scans, 33 were identified with fractures of the cervical spine while 184 were not. The most common mechanisms of trauma, in order, for those with fractures were falls, followed by traffic accidents. We found that the injury severity score, multiple injuries, a high-energy injury mechanism, neurologic deficit, and pain and tenderness of the cervical spine showed statistically significant differences between the two groups.
CONCLUSION
Fractures of the cervical spine that are not observed with simple radiography occur with a relatively high frequency in trauma patients. Consideration should be given to the risk factors for cervical spine fracture, and if pertinent, cervical spine computed tomography should be performed with speed for early diagnosis of cervical spine fractures.
Summary
Early Traumatic Deaths
Seung Won Paik, Chul Han, Yun Sik Hong, Sung Hyuk Choi, Sung Woo Lee, Sung Woo Moon, Young Hoon Yoon, Woo Sung Yu, Duk Hwan Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2010;23(2):75-82.
  • 1,061 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
In Korea, trauma is the 3rd most common cause of death. The trauma treatment system is divided into pre-hospital and hospital stages. Deaths occurring in the pre-hospital stage are 50% of the total death, and 20% of those are deaths that are preventable. Therefore, the purpose of our study is to calculate the preventable death rates caused by trauma in our current pre-hospital system, to analyze the appropriateness of the treatment of traumatized patients and to draw a conclusions about the problems we have.
METHODS
The study was done on traumatized patients who expired at the emergency department from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009, at the Korea University Medical Centers in Anam, Guro and Ansan. The data on the patients were reviewed retrospectively based on characteristics, conditions on admission and trauma severity. The patient's RTS (revised trauma score) and ISS (injury severity score) was calculated. Preventable death rate was calculated by TRISS (the trauma score-injury severity score).
RESULTS
A total of 168 patients were enrolled. All patients were intubated and underwent CPR. Of the total, 72% patients were male, and traffic accidents were the most common form of trauma (52.4%), falls being second (28.6%). Head injury, solitary or multiple, was the most common cause of death (55.4%). Thirty-eight (38, 22.6%) deaths were preventable. The 22.6% preventable death rate consisted of 15.5% potentially preventable and 7.1% definitely preventable deaths. Based on a logistic regression analysis, the relationship between the time intervals until transfusion and imaging and death was statistically significant in the hospital stage. In the pre-hospital stage, transit time from the site of the injury to the hospital showed a significant relationship with the mortality rate.
CONCLUSION
One hundred sixty-eight (168) patients died of trauma at the 3 hospitals of Korea University Medical Center. The TRISS method was used to calculate the preventable death rate, with a result of 22.6%. The only factor that was significant related to the preventable death rate in the pre-hospital stage was the time from injury to hospital arrival, and the time intervals until transfusion and imaging were the two factors that showed significance in the hospital stage. Shortening the time of treatment in the field and transferring the patient to the hospital as quickly as possible is the most important life-saving step in the pre-hospital stage. In the hospital stage, the primary survey, resuscitation and diagnosis should proceed simultaneously.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury