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Chong Kun Hong 4 Articles
Optimal Insertion Angle between the Skin and Needle in Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization with Trauma Patients
Hyun Min Jeon, Sung Min Jung, Ru Bi Jung, Jin Jeon, Chong Kun Hong, Tae Yong Shin, Young Rock Ha, Young Sik Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(3):183-189.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The aim of this study was to identify the optimal insertion angle between the skin and the needle in ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization with trauma patients.
METHODS
From March 2012 to December 2012, consecutive trauma patients who were planned to receive IJV catheterization were prospectively enrolled. We measured the distances from the skin to IJV's anterior-posterior (AP) vessel wall on the longitudinal scan's midline in supine-positioned patients. We calculated the AP diameter of IJV and the angle between skin and the imaginary line from the puncture site to the IJV's internal center on screen's midline (defined as optimal angle which is considered as the safest approach) on the longitudinal scan. We divided the patients into 3 groups based on the CVP (low CVP <5 cmH2O, 5< or = middle CVP < or =10 cmH2O, and high CVP>10 cmH2O) and compared their mean anterior posterior (AP) diameters and optimal angles.
RESULTS
A total of 56 patients were enrolled. Of these 21 were women(35.4%). The mean AP diameter of low CVP group was significantly lower than middle and high CVP groups(0.68+/-0.30, 1.06+/-0.31, and 1.23+/-0.49 cm respectively, p=0.003 vs. 0.002). There was no significant difference among 3 groups' mean optimal angles (28.1+/-6.1, 30.1+/-4.5, and 28.0+/-5.0 degree respectively).
CONCLUSION
The optimal angle between the skin and the needle in ultrasound-guided IJV catheterization with trauma patients is not changed as about 30 degrees regardless of CVP even though IJV's diameter is altered in proportion to the CVP.
Summary
Relationship of Mean Arterial Pressure with the Adverse Outcomes in Adult Blunt Trauma Patients: Cross-sectional Study
Seung Yong Cha, Yong Hwan Kim, Chong Kun Hong, Jun Ho Lee, Kwang Won Cho, Seong Youn Hwang, Kyoung Yul Lee, Younghwan Lee, Seong Hee Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):39-46.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Non-invasive blood pressure measurement is widely used as a pre-hospital triage tool for blunt trauma patients. However, scant data exits for using the mean arterial pressure (MAP), compared to the systolic blood pressure, as a guiding index. The aim of this study was to determine the association between adverse outcomes and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and to exhibit the therapeutic range of the MAP in adult blunt trauma patients.
METHODS
The electronic medical records for all trauma patients in a single hospital from January 2010 to September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients below 17 years of age, patients with penetrating injuries, and patients with serious head trauma (injuries containing any skull fractures or any intracranial hemorrhages) were excluded. Adverse outcomes were defined as one of the following: death in the Emergency Department (ED), admission via operating theater, admission to the intensive care unit, transfer to another hospital for emergency surgery, or discharge as hopeless.
RESULTS
There were 14,537 patients who met entry criteria. Adverse outcomes occurred for MAPs in range from 90 to 120 mmHg. Adverse outcomes were found, after adjusting for confounding variables, to occur increasingly as the MAP declined below 90 mmHg or rose above 120 mmHg.
CONCLUSION
Not only lower but also higher mean arterial pressure is associated with increased adverse outcomes in adult blunt trauma patients. Thus, patients with a MAP above 120 mmHg should be considered as a special group requiring higher medical attention, just as those with a MAP below 90 mmHg are.
Summary
FAST Reappraisal: Cross-sectional Study
Sang Hyun Ha, Chong Kun Hong, Jun Ho Lee, Seong Youn Hwang, Seong Hee Choi
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):67-71.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) provides an important initial screening examination in adult trauma patients. However, due to its low sensitivity, FAST is not a replacement for computed tomography (CT) in hemodynamically stable trauma patients. The aim of this study was to determine the test characteristics of FAST in adult, hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma patients by using a critical action as a reference standard.
METHODS
The medical records for FAST examination at a single hospital from January 2009 to February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criterion was isolated, hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma. Hemodynamically unstable patients or patients with penetrating injuries were excluded. The reference standard was the presence of a critical action, which was defined as one of the following: 1) operative intervention for a finding discovered on CT, 2) interventional radiology for bleeding, 3) transfusion of 2 or more packed RBCs, or 4) death at the emergency department.
RESULTS
There were 230 patients who met the inclusion criterion. There were 20 true positive, 206 true negative, 0 false positive, and 4 false negative results. The sensitivity and the specificity were 83% and 100%, respectively.
CONCLUSION
Despite its low sensitivity for detecting any abnormal finding discovered on CT, negative FAST could aid to exclude critical action in hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma patients.
Summary
Clinical Experience with using a Rapid Infuse at an Urban Emergency Department
Chong Kun Hong, Hyoung Gon Song
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(1):41-46.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Hypovolemia is not uncommon among trauma patients in the emergency department (ED). Successful resuscitation of a hypovolemic patient often requires rapid intravenous administration of massive amounts of fluid. A rapid fluid infuser is used in the ED for this purpose, there have been no studies of their clinical uses and effectiveness. We studied clinical experience with a rapid fluid infuser at an urban university hospital in Seoul, Korea.
METHODS
We reviewed the medical records of 38 patients admitted to the ED with a history of application of a rapid fluid infuser from January 2004 to July 2005. Adult trauma patients older than 15 years of age were included in this study. Clinical data on the patients and the volume of fluid used to achieve a stable blood pressure were extracted from their medical records.
RESULTS
The total number of adult trauma patients with a history of application of a rapid fluid infuser from January 2004 to July 2005 in the ED was 16. The mean systolic blood pressure for deciding to apply the rapid fluid infuser was 74.9+/-12.7 mmHg. The mean time and volume used to achieve a stable blood pressure were 40.4 min and 2947.3+/-1339.2 ml, respectively. In all patients, the amount of fluid infused before using the rapid fluid infuser was between 500 ml and 10,000 ml, compared to 1,000 ml and 6,200 ml with the rapid fluid infuser. The mean amount of fluid per min. via the rapid fluid infuser was 85.5 ml. Vital signs were stabilized in 11 patients, 6 of the 11 were discharged alive.
CONCLUSION
The mean amount of fluid delivered per min. via the rapid fluid infuser was much less than expected; thus, there should be clinical guidelines on volume resuscitation with a rapid fluid infuser in the ED. In the future, prospective, multicenter, clinical-data collection is needed for a more sophisticated study.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury